Schedule of Events

Thursday

6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Keynote Dinner: "The World Trade Center Collapse"

Dr. Barnett’s work and research in fire protection engineering is extensive, including most recently his participation in the Building Performance Assessment Team organized by the American Society of Civil Engineers for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to investigate the collapse of the World Trade Center Towers after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Presenter: Dr. Jonathan Barnett
Location: Alden Hall

 

Friday

8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Student Art Gallery

Student Art Gallery Display Form (optional)

 

8 a.m. - 12 noon

The Nuclear Proliferation Problem: An International Negotiation Game

Those nations that have signed the non-proliferation treat agreeing to phase out nuclear weaponry over time meet with those who refused to sign so far and those that have signed but are not phasing out their weapons to see if this treaty can be saved or if there will be a resumption of the arms race.

Delegations are from nations that have-or could produce-nuclear devices. They meet in the context of tensions between India and Pakistan (non-signers) continued nuclear testing by France and the announced plans in the US to resume development of nuclear, especially ABM, technology, in violation of the current treaty both nations have signed. Questions about the security of the Russian arsenal are also in the air.

Presented by: John Wilkes, WPI Professor of Social Science and Policy Studies
Location: Great Hall, Higgins House
Limit: 40 people

FIRST City Sights

City Sights explores how robotics technology can assist urban planners with providing basic services such as housing and clean water to the inhabitants of the city. Participants will explore the world of apeopleed engineering design concepts, city-planning issues, and build and program LEGO Mindstorms robots to solve a real world challenge.

Presented by: Scott Evans & Mark Terilli, Engineers at US FIRST
Location: Hagglund Room, Campus Center
Limit: 24 people

 

8 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Fishbanks: A Game About Natural Resource Depletion & Sustainable Development

Resource depletion and sustainable development are critical issues facing us today. This game allows students to experience the problem in a near real-life setting of commercial fishing, and to better understand the forces that create the problem.

Presented by: James M. Lyneis, WPI Professor of Social Science & Policy Studies
Location: Olin Hall Room 218
Limit: 30 people

 

8 a.m. - 10 a.m.

Impact of Technology on Traditional Music Careers

Presented by: Doug Weeks, WPI Administrator of Apeopleed Music
Location: Spaulding Performance Hall (Basement of Alden Hall)
Limit: 10 people

Technology of Alpine Skiing

Alpine skiing provides a context for studying a wide range of engineering disciplines, including biomechanics, material science, manufacturing engineering, tribology and strength of materials. We will spend two hours looking at the ski as a composite beam machining the snow to control complex movements down a changing slope. We will also look at injury statistics, mechanisms and risk reduction strategies.

Presented by: Chris Brown, WPI Professor, Manufacturing Engineering
Location: Stratton Hall Room 308
Limit: 54 people

 

8 a.m. - 9 a.m.

Mathematics in the Real World, from jet Engines to Insurance

Presented by: Bogdan Vernescu & Arthur Heinricher, WPI Professors of Mathematics
Location: Higgins Labs Room 202
Limit: 35 people

 

9 a.m. - 10 a.m.

Fire Protection Lab Tour

Learn about one of the best-kept secrets in careers today, Fire Protection Engineering. View a small fire demonstration of a Cone Calorimeter and learn how this instrument is used to measure material Flammability properties. "See" thermal energy with an IR camera demonstration. Watch flashover in a video of a test conducted in the Room Calorimeter. Observe a live sprinkler activation.

Presented by: Patricia Beaulieu, PhD Candidate
Location: Fire Lab, Higgins Labs
Limit: 30 people

 

10 a.m. - 12 noon

Discreet 3ds max౦

Learn to use Discreet 3ds max® to create eye-catching animation for the Internet. Participants will create a short 3D animation and post it on the Internet in a variety of formats, including Flash and Interactive 3D.

Presented by: Michele Bousquet, Discreet, Technical Publications Division Author of "Mastering the Art of Production with 3ds max 4"
3D animation for the web
Location: Movie Lab, Gordon Library Room 208
Limit: 20 people

Tour of Worcester Centrum Centre

Take a tour around the Worcester Centrum, Central Massachusetts’ performing arts and civic center which hosts everything from major rock concerts to hockey games, and see the technology behind the musical events performed there.

Presented by: Jim Moughan, Assistant General Manager, Worcester Centrum Centre
Location: Worcester Centrum Centre
Limit: 30 people

Arms and Armor in History

Students will visit the Higgins Armory in Worcester, home to the largest collection of armor in the western hemisphere outside of the Tower of London. Attend a presentation on the evolution of arms & armor from Roman times to the European Renaissance, followed by a guided tour of the museum’s galleries and a visit to the conservation laboratory.

Presented by: Diane Berg, Senior Interpreter, Higgins Armory
Location: Higgins Armory Museum
Limit: 30 people

The Space Age Begins in Worcester with Rocket Pioneer, Robert Goddard

Robert Goddard’s life and accomplishments will be presented through the use of slides and an historic film of his early launches. Goddard’s inventions created a new field of engineering that changed society and launched the world into the Space Age. The process of creating a memorial in his honor will also be discussed.

Presented by: Barbara Berka, Secretary/Community Outreach Goddard Memorial Association
Location: Higgins Labs Room 114
Limit: 35 people

Art Restoration & Preservation in Venice

Presented by: Fabio Carrera, WPI, Global Program Manager
Location: Atwater Kent Room 232
Limit: 30 people

Acoustic Radiation Control and Cancellation Experience

Loud environments present a difficult work environment and can be "quieted" by a negative sound source. This same principle can be used to shape and steer the sound projected from a source. Participants will experience acoustic cancellation for beam steering and noise control while developing a better understanding of acoustics and waves. Several demonstrations will be done requiring student participation. An additional topic will include the discussion of how music affects humanity and emotion.

Presented by: David Blore, Bose Corporation, Westborough, MA
Location: Olin Hall Room 126
Limit: 25 people

Viisage Technology

Viisage Technology of Littleton, MA is a world leader in identification systems and facial recognition technology. Based on concepts developed at MIT's Media Lab, Viisage has developed a laboratory demonstration of the facial recognition biometric into a full and robust product suite. Facial recognition allows law enforcement and security personnel to search both live and real time and in data bases looking for specific individuals and threats. The Viisage facial recognition system is deployed in many police departments as part of the booking and mug shot system. During booking, the system takes the full frontal picture and compares it to the existing data base of mug shots to determine if there are any matches. Very often, career criminals give aliases when being arrested. This practice can confound alphanumeric data bases and denies the police proper identification of the individual. Facial recognition compares the face of the arrested person with the entire data base regardless of the name given. Since the individual cannot change his face, a match will occur if he is already in the data base.

Auburn, MA Police have been a technology partner of Viisage for many years. They have a digital image mug shot system with facial recognition. It will be demonstrated for the conference. Students and members of the conference will be able to work with the system and get a good 'hands-on' experience of how it works.

Presented by: Gerald (Jerry) Byrnes, Vice President Federal Systems, Viisage Technology
Location: Stratton Hall Room 304
Limit: 25 people

 

10 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Fire Protection Lab Tour

Learn about one of the best-kept secrets in careers today, Fire Protection Engineering. View a small fire demonstration of a Cone Calorimeter and learn how this instrument is used to measure material Flammability properties. "See" thermal energy with an IR camera demonstration. Watch flashover in a video of a test conducted in the Room Calorimeter. Observe a live sprinkler activation.

Presented by: Patricia Beaulieu, PhD Candidate
Location: Fire Lab, Higgins Labs
Limit: 30 people

 

11 a.m. - 12 noon

Computational Modeling

Powerful modern computers and sophisticated software have made computational modeling an indispensable tool of contemporary apeopleed mathematics, science and engineering. We will introduce the elements of computational modeling and look at a number of examples with lots of pictures and movies.

Presented by Homer Walker, WPI Presented by Homer Walker, WPI Professor of Mathematics
Location: Goddard Hall Room 311
Limit: 35 people

 

1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

NASA Vision

From astronaut to chief scientist for the International Space Station, Roger Crouch will talk about his experiences in space, show a brief film and discuss the vision, challenges and opportunities NASA faces with the International Space Station. This presentation will be followed by a meet and greet reception including opportunities to secure his autograph.

Presented by: Roger Crouch, NASA Headquarters
Location: Goddard Hall Room 227
Limit: 80 people

Rehabilitation Engineering & the Design of Assistive Devices

Engineers play a major role in the design and development of devices that aid people with disabilities. Topics include; types of disabilities, rehabilitation engineering, the design process and evaluation assistive devices. Examples of successful assistive devices, including some designed by WPI students, will be presented. This session includes hands-on activities.

Presented by: Allen Hoffman, WPI Professor, Mechanical Engineering
Location: Higgins Labs Room 116
Limit: 30 people

New Technologies Used in Professional Theatre

A discussion of digital orchestrations, robotic lighting, on-line ticketing & seating and Auto-Cad for scenic & lighting design. Opportunities for technology based students in Arts Organizations and service companies that support the Arts will be outlined.

Presented by: Bob Dolan, Director of Education & Training, Foothills Theatre Company, Worcester, MA
Location: Foothills Theatre, Worcester
Limit: 30 people

War and Artistic Protest

This seminar will be a discussion of the nature of war based on the historical background of World War I where technology and life connected in a particularly devastating and horrific manner. It will discuss the three stages of war: heroic optimism, stern reality and the sullen aftermath as reflected in literature, song, art and cinema.

Presented by: Patrick Quinn, WPI Professor, Humanities and Arts
Location: Higgins Labs Room 116
Limit: 30 people

From Genes to Longevity

The talk will focus on how to capture the synergies of stem cell biology, functional genomics and informatics to unlock the unique characteristics of centenarians and generate therapeutics that promote longevity and a high quality of life by preventing, reversing or slowing diseases of aging and degeneration.

Presented by Dr. Doros Platika, MD, Centagenetix, Inc.
Location: Stratton Hall Room 309
Limit: 48 people

 

3 p.m. - 5 p.m.

What is Architecture and Does Worcester Have Any?

A slide introduction to terms, characteristics and details of architecture will be followed by student scavenger hunts for nearby examples.

Presented by: David Samson, WPI Professor, Art History/Architecture
Location: Goddard Hall Room 227
Limit: 50 people

My Life: A Journey with Arts, Politics and Surprises

A theatrical writer/producer tracks his life through the last two-thirds of the last century and explores how an economic depression, a world war, a cold war and a continuum of local wars through Sept. 11, 2002 affect his art and then though his art, affect others, perhaps even you.

Presented by: Mark P. Smith, Executive Producer, Blue Pumpkin Productions
Location: Stratton Hall Room 106
Limit: 40 people

Slam! Performance Poetry in Action

Performance poetry and poetry slams bring new life to the word. This session features a presentation by an accomplished poet and workshop opportunities for all to explore the craft. Come to experience a new breed of poetry that fuses oral tradition to contemporary life.

Presented by: Nina Simon, WPI Student
Location: Stratton Hall Room 202
Limit: 40 people

How "Organizational Mindsets" Shape Technology: Examples from Aerospace & Nuclear Technology

World’s Space Agencies, which have different organizational "mindsets", will be compared in terms of what systems they are creating out of the common pool of space technology. The ESA/NASA difference regarding manned and unmanned technology will be featured and why the British pioneered VTOL fighter aircraft (The Harrier) rather than the US will also be explored in terms of "organizational mindsets."

Presented by: John Wilkes, WPI Professor, Social Science & Policy Studies
Location: Higgins Labs Room 154
Limit: 35 people

Digital Imaging: More Than Putting Your Friend’s Head On Your Dog

This hands-on workshop will cover the basics of scanning images and manipulating them in Photoshop. Students will learn how to scan in an image using the appropriate settings, basic color correction and some tips and tricks for creating special effects.

Presented by: Keith Babuszczak, WPI Graphics Production Coordinator
Location: Movie Lab, Gordon Library Room 208
Limit: 25 people

 

3 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Math Can Bend Your Mind

Mathematics can lead to surprising results and sometimes lead you down the primrose path. We will explore some examples involving probability, numbers and counting and throw in a few other things just for fun.

Presented by Homer Walker, WPI Professor of Mathematics
Location: Higgins Labs Room 114
Limit: 20 people

 

4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Staging a Theatrical Production without a Theatre and Other Challenges of Technological University Performance.

Presented by: Susan Vick, WPI Professor, Drama/Theatre
Location: Alden Hall Stage
Limit: 40 people

 

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Dinner Plenary - Professor Thomas A. Shannon, Keynote Speaker

Thomas A. ShannonDr. Shannon is a Professor of Religion and Social Ethics in the Department of Humanities and Arts at WPI. He is the author of over 20 books and 40 articles in the area of bioethics and social ethics. He will discuss some of the ethical issues in genetics today especially in the area of stem cell research.

Location: Odeum, Campus Center

 

Saturday, October 26

8 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Student Art Gallery

Student Art Gallery Display Form (optional)

 

8 a.m. - 12 noon

To Soar!

Participants will learn about the unique form of flight called Soaring where high performance gliders use air currents to remain aloft for hours on end. The program will start outdoors with a viewing of several high performance sailplanes that will be set up on the WPI quad (weather permitting). These sailplanes, brought in by local members of the Greater Boston Soaring Group (GBSC), represent the state of the art in sailplane design for training and competition. This hands-on session will include a discussion of sailplane technologies such as materials, design and performance criteria, safety and flight characteristics, and how a sailplane is assembled. After this outdoor session, the group will head over to Alden Hall where we will view several short videos on the art of soaring and continue our discussion of flight and sailplane technologies, sailplane design, and performance. Finally, we will move upstairs to the Alden performance auditorium where we will break into small groups and challenge each group to design and build a glider that can achieve a distance and accuracy goal. All building materials will be supeopleed. Teamwork will be stressed. Prizes will be awarded to the groups with the best design and flying performance.

Presented by: Fred Looft, WPI Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Soaring Pilot and sailplane owner - - and in cooperation with the Greater Boston Soaring Club/MITSA.
Location: WPI Campus Quad (outside of Harrington Auditorium) and Alden Hall
Limit: 40 people

Project AEGIS: An Asteroid Shield for Planet Earth?

In this game space faring nations have people from their space agencies meet to see if they can work together on an asteroid deflection device as a UN sponsored and funded activity. The context for the decision is immediately after a near miss in which Earth was almost struck by a stony Asteroid three times as large as that which hit Tunguska, Siberia in 1908. The UN calls together the space faring nations of the world to see if they can work together over the next 50-100 years to ward of this kind of threat in the future. The nature of the technology to be shared is, of course, militarily "sensitive", and UN funding will come with some strings attached. Briefing papers will explain cultural differences to participants who will be assigned technical, scientific, bureaucratic or diplomatic roles in the various delegations.

Presented by: John Wilkes, WPI Professor of Social Science & Policy Studies
Location: Great Hall, Higgins House
Limit: 48 people

 

8 a.m. - 10 a.m.

The Design of Tall Buildings

The analysis, design and construction aspects of tall buildings will be illustrated in this lecture. This talk will illustrate how some of these buildings are designed, by explaining the structural systems to carry gravity and lateral loads, and the design of columns, girders and diagonal bracings, which resist the wind loads. Some issues related to the collapse of the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center will be examined to suggest some improvements in future designs.

Presented by: P. Jaychandran, WPI Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Location: Stratton Hall Room 308
Limit: 50 people

Manufacturing and Computer-controlled Machining

After a brief discussion of the essential role of machining in manufacturing and the industrialization of New England, everyone will get to try out some CAD (computer-aided design) and CAM (computer-aided manufacturing) software. We will demonstrate some of the amazing, new CNC machine tools in WPI’s Haas Technical Center - multi-axes and live tooling. You can go online to http://www.me.wpi.edu/MFE/. Limit: 16

Presented by: Chris Brown, WPI Professor, Manufacturing Engineering
Location: Washburn Labs Room 107
Limit: 16 people

Frankenstein: or How a Teenage Girl Created the Biggest Myth

Explore Mary Shelley’s classic in terms of how a teenage girl (the age of many high school seniors) created on of the most important myths about creativity, science, ethics and society in modern times. Students should have read the original at least once in the last 12 months and be familiar with at least one movie version.

Presented by: Lance Schachterle, WPI Professor of Humanities & Arts
Location: Chairman’s Room, Campus Center
Limit: 30 people

Artist for Life

A discussion on art, life, learning and their inseparability. As students in the classroom of life we are all artists. Participants will learn to awaken their senses through activities designed to break away sight and thought barriers. A presentation of photographs will be used to illustrate key points.

Presented by: Kirk Jalbert, Instructor Clark University, WPI Alumnus
Location: Higgins Labs Room 114
Limit: 20 people

 

8 a.m. - 9 a.m.

The Promise and Peril of Nanotechnology

Is the prospect of miniaturized devices, possibly for injection into the human body, a blessing or a curse? Science is making major advances in the design, fabrication, and control of materials, circuits, and drug delivery systems at the nanoscale. After a few words about some of the possible risks of nanotechnology, some aspects of nanoscience that hold great promise for future researchers will be discussed.

Presented by Nancy Burnham, WPI Professor, Physics
Location: Olin Hall Room 223
Limit: 40 people

 

10 a.m. - 12 noon

What is Architecture and Does Worcester Have Any?

A slide introduction to terms, characteristics and details of architecture will be followed by student scavenger hunts for nearby examples.

Presented by: David Samson, WPI Professor, Art History/ Architecture
Location: Goddard Hall Room 227
Limit: 50 people

Teaching Historic Primary Source Materials Through Classroom Drama

This program uses materials from the American Antiquarian Society, a national research library of American History and Cultures, to provide an evocative interdisciplinary approach to the study of Early American History and Literature.

Presented by Neil Gustafson, American Antiquarian Society
Location: Higgins Labs Room 154
Limit: 30 people

Investigation of Student Misconceptions in Introductory Physics

Have you ever looked over a friend’s homework solution? If presented with a solution to a problem, how would you know if it is correct, and would you be able to identify any misconceptions? For over two decades, research in physics education has provided us with numerous examples of introductory physics misconceptions. However, research in physics education also teaches us how to clarify and to build a more coherent conceptual understanding of introductory physics courses and will provide students with an opportunity to examine and ‘debug’ (if even necessary) solutions to common introductory physics textbook problems. Non-traditional methods for teaching and learning introductory physics will serve as a framework for this seminar.

Presented by Carolann Koleci, WPI Physics Professor
Location: Stratton Hall Room 309
Limit: 40 people

Capture the Image!

The preservation of old photographs is a problem facing many organizations today. Participants will learn how to save photographs by converting them to digital images. There are many options in the digitations process that we will address. Please bring an old photograph that you would like to preserve.

Presented by Katie Lampert, Alison Burkart & David Campbell, WPI Seniors
Location: Morgan Room, Campus Center
Limit: 10 people

Fuel-Cell Powered Aircraft

Presented by Jim Dunn, & Ravi Datta, WPI Professor
Location: Worcester Airport Hanger #2
Limit: 25 people

Digital Imaging: More Than Putting Your Friend’s Head on Your Dog

This hands-on workshop will cover the basics of scanning images and manipulating them in Photoshop. Students will learn how to scan in an image using the appropriate settings, basic color correction and some tips and tricks for creating special effects.

Presented by: Keith Babuszczak, WPI Graphics Production Coordinator
Location: Movie Lab, Gordon Library Room 208
Limit: 25 people

Contact: Pauline Lamarche (lamarche@wpi.edu)
Maintained by: webmaster@wpi.edu
Last modified: Jan 14, 2005, 15:47 EST