Electrical & Computer Engineering

Faculty and Research Interests

Fred J. Looft, Professor and Department Head; Ph.D., Michigan. Digital and analog systems, microprocessor and embedded systems, space-flight systems, robots and robotic systems, robot sensors, alternative energy systems, systems engineering capstones and education.

Donald R. Brown, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Cornell University. Wireless communications and networks, cooperative communication systems, synchronization, efficient resource allocation, distributed decision making, game-theoretic analysis of networks, peer-to-peer networks, cognitive radio, software defined radio, computationally efficient signal processing, security in wireless communication systems.

Edward (Ted) A. Clancy, Associate Professor; Ph.D., MIT. Biomedical signal processing and modeling, biomedical instrumentation.

David Cyganski, Professor; Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Precision indoor location systems, sensor systems for first responder safety, radar, sonar, and optical phased arrays for automatic target recognition.

R. James Duckworth, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Nottingham University. Embedded computer system design, computer architecture, real-time systems, wireless instrumentation, rapid prototyping, logic synthesis, location and tracking systems.

Alexander E. Emanuel, Professor; D.Sc., Israel Institute of Technology. Power quality, power electronics, electromagnetic design, high-voltage technology.

Ximing Huang, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Virginia Tech. Reconfigurable computing; VLSI and SoC design; parallel processing.

Hossein Hakim, Associate Professor and Associate Department Head; Ph.D., Purdue University. Digital signal processing, system engineering.

Andrew Klein, Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Cornell University. Signal processing for communication systems, cooperative networks, adaptive parameter estimation, and equalization.

Reinhold Ludwig, Professor; Ph.D., Colorado State University. Design of RF and surface gradient coils for magnetic resonance imaging; computational modeling of micropatch antennas; DC-coupled RF/MW wideband amplified design; nondestructive material evaluation of critical components.

Sergey N. Makarov, Professor; Ph.D., St. Petersburg State University (Russia). Electromagnetic field devices; electromagnetic sensors; knowledge-based data processing.

John A. McNeill, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Boston University. Analog IC design; high-speed imaging; mixed-signal circuit characterization.

William R. Michalson, Professor; Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Navigation and tracking; high-performance embedded computer systems.

John A. Orr, Professor; Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Digital signal processing and communications as applied to indoor navigation systems and electrical power systems, engineering education.

Taskin Padir, Visiting Assistant Professor; Ph.D., Purdue University; Modeling and control of robotic systems, kinematics and dynamics of robot manipulators, redundancy resolution and trajectory planning, automated system design, machine vision.

Kaveh Pahlavan, Professor; Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Wireless networks.

Peder C. Pedersen, Professor and Director of the Denmark Project Center; Ph.D., University of Utah. Ultrasound in telemedicine, ultrasound training systems, 3D imaging and visualization, elastography, automated image analysis, ultrasound based atherosclerotic plaque classification.

Berk Sunar, Associate Professor; Ph.D., Oregon State University. Security; cryptography; computer arithmetic; finite fields; high-speed computing.

Richard F. Vaz, Associate Professor, Dean of the Interdisciplinary and Global Studies Division, Co-Director of the Bangkok and Limerick Project Centers; Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Technological education reform, internationalization of higher education, project-based education, sustainable design and appropriate technology.

Alexander M. Wyglinski, Assistant Professor and Director of the Limerick, Ireland, Project Center; Ph.D., McGill University. Wireless communications, cognitive radio, software-defined radio, transceiver optimization, dynamic spectrum access networks, signal processing for digital communications, wireless networks.

Programs of Study

The Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department offers programs leading to M.Eng., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering, an M.Eng. degree in power systems engineering (PSE), as well as graduate and advanced certificates. The following general areas of specialization are available to help students structure their graduate courses: biomedical signal processing/instrumentation, communications and signal processing, computer engineering, electromagnetics and ultrasonics engineering, electronics and solid state, power engineering, and systems and controls.

The M.S. ECE degree is designed to provide an individual with advanced knowledge in one or more electrical and computer engineering areas via successful completion of at least 21 credits of WPI ECE graduate courses (including M.S. thesis credit), combined with up to 9 credits of coursework from computer science, mathematics, physics and other engineering disciplines.

The M.Eng. ECE and M.Eng. PSE degrees are tailored for individuals seeking an industrial career path. Similar to the M.S. degree, the M.Eng. degree requires the successful completion of at least 21 credits of WPI ECE graduate courses (specific course requirements for the M.S. ECE and M.S. PSE degrees are discussed in the course descriptions). In contrast to the M.S. degree, the M.Eng. degree allows up to 9 credits on non-ECE courses to be chosen as management courses and does not include a thesis option.

Admission Requirements

Master’s Program

Students with a B.S. degree in electrical engineering or electrical and computer engineering may submit an application for admission to the Master’s program. There are three degree options in the Master’s program: An M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering, an M.Eng. in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and an M.Eng. in Power Systems Engineering. Admission to the Master’s program will be based on a review of the application and associated references.

Applicants without a B.S. degree in electrical engineering or electrical and computer engineering, but who hold a B.S. degree in mathematics, computer engineering, physics or another engineering discipline, may also apply for admission to the Master’s program in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. If admitted, the applicant will be provided with required courses necessary to reach a background equivalent to the B.S. degree in electrical engineering or electrical and computer engineering, which will depend on the applicant’s specific background.

Applicants with the bachelor of technology or the bachelor of engineering technology degree must typically complete about 1-1/2 years of undergraduate study in electrical engineering before they can be admitted to the graduate program. If admitted, the applicant will be provided with required courses necessary to reach a background equivalent to the B.S. degree in electrical engineering or electrical and computer engineering, which will depend on the applicant’s specific background.

Ph.D. Program

Students with a Master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering may apply for the doctoral program of study. Admission to the Ph.D. program will be based on a review of the application and associated references. Students with a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical and computer engineering may also apply to the Ph.D. program. Students with a strong background in areas other than Electrical and Computer Engineering will also be considered for admission into the Ph.D. program. If admitted (based on review of the application and associated references), the applicant may be approved for direct admission to the Ph.D. program, or to an M.S.-Ph.D.. program sequence. Applicants possessing and M.S. degree in electrical and computer engineering from WPI that have not been directly admitted to the Ph.D. program are still required to submit an application and associated references for consideration, with the exception of GRE scores, TOEFL scores, and the application fee.

Certificate Requirements

The ECE Department offers advanced certificate and graduate certificate programs. Please view more details about these certificate programs.

Degree Requirements

For the Master’s Degree Program

There are three degree options within the Master’s program in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department: A Master of Engineering in Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.Eng. ECE), a Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering (M.S. ECE), and a Master of Engineering in Power Systems Engineering (M.Eng. PSE). Students pursuing the M.S. ECE degree may take either the non-thesis option, which requires 30 graduate credits in course work, independent study, or directed research, or the thesis option, with a total of 30 graduate credits including a 9-credit thesis. In either case, at least 21 of the 30 credits must be graduate level activity (designated 500-, 5000-, or 600-level) in the field of electrical and computer engineering (course prefix ECE) offered by WPI. The remaining credits may be either at the 4000 (maximum of six credits) or the 500 level in computer science (CS), physics (PH), engineering (BME, CHE, CE, ECE, FP, MFE, MTE, ME, RBE, and SYS) and/or mathematics (MA). The complete program must be approved by the student’s advisor and the Graduate Program Committee.

Students pursuing the M.Eng. ECE degree require 30 graduate credits in course work, independent study, or directed research. There is no thesis option for the M.Eng. ECE degree program. At least 21 of the 30 credits must be graduate level activity (designated 500-, 5000-, or 600-level) in the field of electrical and computer engineering (course prefix ECE) offered by WPI. The remaining credits may be either at the 4000 level (maximum of six credits) or at the graduate level in computer science (CS), physics (PH), engineering (BME, CHE, CE, ECE FP, MFE, MTE, ME, RBE, and SYS), mathematics (MA), and/or from the School of Business (ACC, BUS, ETR, FIN, MIS, MKT, OBC, and OIE). The complete program must be approved by the student’s advisor and the Graduate Program Committee.

The M.Eng. PSE is primarily delivered to industry professionals at a variety of off-campus locations; students should contact the ECE office staff regarding course availability. Students pursuing the M.Eng. PSE degree require 30 graduate credits in course work, independent study, or directed research. There is no thesis option for the M.Eng. PSE degree program. At least 21 of the 30 credits must be graduate level activity in the field of electrical and computer engineering offered by WPI; of these 21 credits, at least 15 must be in the field of power system engineering (course prefix ECE with course numbers from 5500 through 5599). The remaining courses may be either at the 4000 level (maximum of two) or at the graduate level (designated as 500-, 5000-, or 600-level) in computer science (CS), physics (PH), engineering (BME, CHE, CE, ECE, FP, MFE, MTE, ME, RBE, and SYS), mathematics (MA), and/or from the School of Business (ACC, BUS, ETR, FIN, MIS, MKT, OBC, and OIE).

Program of Study

Each student must submit a program of study for approval by the student’s advisor, the ECE Department Graduate Program Committee and the ECE Department Head. To ensure that the Program of Study is acceptable, students should, in consultation with their advisor, submit it to the ECE Department Graduate Secretary prior to the end of the semester following admission into the graduate program. Students must obtain prior approval from the ECE Department Graduate Program Committee for the substitution of courses in other disciplines as part of their academic program.

All full-time students in the Master’s degree program (with the exception of B.S./M.S. students as noted below) are required to attend and pass the two graduate seminar courses, ECE 596A (fall semester) and ECE 596B (spring semester). See course listings for details.

Thesis Option

Students pursuing an M.S. ECE degree that are financially supported by the department in the form of teaching assistantship, research assistantship, or fellowship are required to complete a thesis. The thesis option is not available for students pursuing an M.Eng. ECE or M.Eng. PSE degree. M.S. thesis research involves 9 credit hours of work, registered under the designation ECE 599, normally spread over at least one academic year. For students completing the M.S. thesis as part of their degree requirements, a thesis committee will be set up during the first semester of thesis work. This committee will be selected by the student in consultation with the major advisor and will consist of the thesis advisor (who must be a full-time WPI ECE faculty member) and at least two other faculty members whose expertise will aid the student’s research program. An oral presentation before the Thesis Committee and a general audience is required. In addition, all WPI thesis regulations must be followed.

Non-Thesis Option

Although the thesis is optional for M.S. ECE students not financially supported by the department, and there is no thesis option available for M.Eng. ECE or M.Eng. PSE students, all M.Eng. and M.S. students are encouraged to include a research component in their graduate program. A directed research project, registered under the designation ECE 598, involves a minimum of 3 credit hours of work under the supervision of a faculty member. The task is limited to a well-defined goal. Note that the Graduate Program committee will not allow credit received under the thesis designation (ECE 599) to be applied toward an M.Eng. ECE degree, M.Eng. PSE degree, or non-thesis M.S. ECE degree.

Transfer Credit

Students may petition to transfer a maximum of 15 graduate semester credits, with a grade of B or better, after they have enrolled in the degree program. This may be made up of a combination of up to 9 credits from the WPI ECE graduate courses taken prior to formal admission and up to 9 credits from other academic institutions. Transfer credit will not be allowed for undergraduate level courses taken at other institutions. In general, transfer credit will not be allowed for any WPI undergraduate courses used to fulfill undergraduate degree requirements; however note that there are exceptions in the case of students enrolled in the B.S./M.S. program.

For the Ph.D.

The degree of doctor of philosophy is conferred on candidates in recognition of high scientific attainments and the ability to carry on original research. The following is a list of requirements for students intending to obtain a Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Coursework and Residency Requirements

Students must complete 60 or more credits of graduate work beyond the credit required for the Master of Science degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering. Of the 60 credits, at least 30 credits must be research registered under the designation ECE 699. The doctoral student must also establish two minors in fields outside of electrical engineering. Physics, mathematics and/or computer science are usually recommended. Each student selects the minors in consultation with their Research Advisor. At least 6 credits of graduate work is required in each minor area. Courses with an ECE designation which are cross-listed in the course offerings of another department cannot be used toward fulfilling the requirements of a minor area.

All doctoral students are required to attend and pass two offerings of the ECE graduate seminar courses, ECE 596A (fall semester) and ECE 596B (spring semester). These students may either enroll in the same ECE graduate seminar course offered in two different semesters, or enroll in each of the two different ECE graduate seminar courses. Note that enrollment in these two courses is required regardless if the student has already successfully passed these courses and counted them towards the requirements of an M.S. degree or equivalent credit.

Full-time residency at WPI for at least one academic year is required while working toward a Ph.D. degree.

Research Advisor and Committee Selection

The doctoral student is required to select a Research Advisor and their Committee prior to scheduling their Diagnostic Examination. This will usually occur prior to the start of the student’s second semester in the graduate program. The Research Advisor and all members of the Committee must hold doctoral degrees. The Research Advisor must be a full-time ECE faculty member. The Committee must consist of at least two faculty members, at least one of which must be an ECE faculty member and at least one of which must be from outside the ECE department or from outside WPI. The Committee is usually selected by the student in consultation with the Research Advisor. All members of the committee must be approved by the Research Advisor.

A completed Research Advisor and Committee Selection form must be filed with the ECE department prior to taking the Diagnostic Exam. A student may change their Research Advisor or members of their Committee by submitting a new Research Advisor and Committee Selection form to the Graduate Secretary. Changes to the student’s Research Advisor after completion of the diagnostic examination must be approved by the ECE Graduate Program Committee. Changes to the student’s Committee after completion of the area examination must be approved by the ECE Graduate Program Committee.

Diagnostic Examination Requirement

The doctoral student is required to complete the diagnostic examination requirement during the first year beyond the M.S. degree (or equivalent number of credits, for students admitted directly to the Ph.D. program) with a grade of Pass. The diagnostic examination is scheduled with the student’s Research Advisor and Committee. Prior to scheduling the diagnostic examination, a student must have a completed Research Advisor and Committee Selection form on file in the ECE department.

The diagnostic examination is administered by the student’s Research Advisor and at least one member of the Committee. Full participation of the Committee is recommended. At the discretion of the research advisor, additional faculty outside of the student’s committee may also participate in the diagnostic examination. The diagnostic examination is intended to be an opportunity to evaluate the student’s level of academic preparation and identify any shortcomings in the student’s background upon entrance to the PhD program. The format and duration of the diagnostic examination is at the discretion of the student’s Research Advisor and Committee. The examination may be written or oral and may include questions to test the general background of the student as well as questions specific to the student’s intended area of research.

The Research Advisor and Committee determine the outcome of the diagnostic examination (Pass, Repeat, or Fail) and any required remediation intended to address shortcomings identified in the student’s background. A grade of Fail will result in dismissal from the graduate program. A grade of Repeat requires the student to reschedule and retake the diagnostic examination. A grade of Pass is expected to also include a summary of any prescribed remediation including, but not limited to, coursework, reading assignments, and/or independent study. Irrespective of outcome of the examination, a diagnostic examination completion form, signed by the student’s Research Advisor and committee, must be filed with the ECE department upon completion of the examination.

Upon successful completion of the Diagnostic Examination, each doctoral student must submit a program of study to the ECE Department Graduate Secretary for approval by the student’s research advisor, the ECE Department Graduate Program Committee and the ECE Department Head. The program of study should be completed in consultation with the student’s research advisor and should include specific course work designed to address any shortcomings identified in the student’s background during the Diagnostic Examination.

Area Examination Requirement

The doctoral student is required to pass the area examination before writing a dissertation. The area examination is intended to be an opportunity for the student’s Advisor and Committee members to evaluate the suitability, scope, and novelty of the student’s proposed dissertation topic. The format of the area examination is at the discretion of the student’s Advisor and Committee but will typically include a presentation by the student describing the current state of their research field, their planned research activities, and the expected contributions of their work.

Students are eligible to take the area examination after they have successfully completed the diagnostic examination and have completed at least three semesters of coursework in the graduate program. All PhD students are required to successfully complete the area examination prior to the completion of their seventh semester in the graduate program. Failure to successfully complete the area examination prior to the end of the student’s seventh semester will be considered a failure to make satisfactory academic progress.

The Research Advisor and Committee determine the Pass/Fail outcome of the area examination. A grade of Fail will result in dismissal from the graduate program. Area examination completion forms must be signed by the student’s Research Advisor and Committee Members and filed with the ECE department upon completion of the examination.

Dissertation Requirement

All Ph.D. students must complete and orally defend a dissertation prepared under the general supervision of their Research Advisor. The research described in the dissertation must be original and constitute a contribution to knowledge in the major field of the candidate. The Research Advisor and Committee certify the quality and originality of the dissertation research, the satisfactory execution of the dissertation and the preparedness of the defense.

The Graduate Secretary must be notified of a student’s defense at least seven days prior to the date of the defense, without exception. A student may not schedule a defense until at least three months after they have completed the area examination.

For the Combined B.S./M.S. Program

A WPI student accepted into the B.S./ M.S. program may use 12 credit hours of work for both the B.S. and M.S. degrees. Note that students will not be able to receive an M.Eng. ECE or M.Eng. PSE degree via this particular program. At least 6 credit hours must be graduate courses (including graduate level independent study and special topics courses), and none may be lower than the 4000-level. No extra work is required in the 4000-level courses. A grade of B or better is required for any course to be counted toward both degrees. A student must define the 12 credit hours at the time of applying to the B.S./M.S. program. Applications will not be considered if they are submitted prior to the second half of the applicant’s junior year. Ideally, applications (including recommendations) should be completed by the early part of the last term of the junior year.

At the start of Term A in the senior year, but no later than at the time of application, students are required to submit to the graduate coordinator of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department a list of proposed courses to be taken as part of the M.S. degree program. A copy of the student’s academic transcript (grade report) must be included with the application.

All students in the B.S./M.S. program in Electrical and Computer Engineering who have completed their B.S. degree must register for at least six credits per semester until they complete 30 credits toward their M.S. degree. If fewer than six credits are required to complete the M.S. degree, then the student must register for at least the number of credits required to complete the degree. If a student double counts a full 12 credits for both the M.S. and B.S. degrees, then the remaining 18 credits must be completed within 3 semesters of graduate work (1.5 years). Students who double count less than 12 credits for both the M.S. and B.S. degree will be allowed an additional semester (2 years) to complete the degree.

All B.S./M.S. students are required to attend and pass one of the graduate seminar courses, either ECE 596A (fall semester) or ECE 596B (spring semester).

Students enrolled in the B.S./M.S. program in Electrical and Computer Engineering may petition for permission to use a single graduate course (3 credits maximum) taken at other institutions to satisfy ECE B.S./M.S. degree requirements. The course must be at the graduate level and the student must have earned a grade of B or better to be considered for transfer credit.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Research Laboratories/Centers

Adaptive Signal Processing and Emerging Communications Technologies (ASPECT) Laboratory

Prof. Klein

The mission of the ASPECT Lab is studying a range of problems relating to both the basic theory as well as practical design strategies for next-generation wireless communication networks. The research employs tools from a variety of areas, including communication and information theories, statistical signal processing, and adaptive parameter estimation. Representative research: exploiting frequency selectivity in cooperative communication links, practical transceiver design for cooperative and relay communication systems, and adaptive digital compensation of RF frontend non-idealities.

Analog Microelectronics Laboratory

Prof. McNeill

The Analog and Mixed Signal Microelectronics Laboratory focuses on the continuation of research in self-calibrating analog to-digital converter architectures; funded by NSF and Analog Devices, developing mixed signal IC for biomedical instrumentation; funded by NECAMSID and TATRC, RF IC design for adaptive system to tolerate interference in wireless communication; funded by NECAMSID.  

Antenna Laboratory

Prof. Makarov

The Antenna Laboratory uses modeling and hardware design of UHF, L-band, and X-band antennas including wearable antennas (low UHF), base station wideband GPS/modernized GPS antennas (L-band), the broadband rib-cage dipoles, and the UHF non-scanning antenna arrays for directed power applications.

Center for Advanced Integrated Radio Navigation (CAIRN)

Prof. Michalson

The Center for Advanced, Integrated, Radio Navigation (CAIRN) mission is the development of radio systems that integrate communications and navigation functions. Basic research into radio design (analog and digital), wireless ad hoc networking and positioning is performed for both indoor and outdoor radio environments. The laboratory develops, designs, implements, and field-tests a variety of radio and navigation systems. Housed within the laboratory is the Public Safety Integration Center, which focuses on the development and deployment of communications, information, and navigation technologies for public safety applications. Representative projects: Radio systems for indoor positioning, Digital radios for public safety systems, Simulation of wireless ad hoc networks for public safety applications.

Center for Wireless Information Networking Studies (CWINS)

Prof. Pahlavan

The Center for Wireless Information Network Studies mission includes hybrid localization to integrate cell-tower based and WiFi localization, UWB RF channel measurement, and modeling for indoor geolocation for robotics applications.

Cryptography and Information Security (CRIS) Laboratory

Prof. Sunar

The Cryptography and Information Security (CRIS) Laboratory mission is to address security and reliability related problems at various levels by developing new security technologies to ensure the safety of all facets of the communication infrastructure. CRIS aims to bridge the gap between cutting edge research and solid engineering practices, and to provide the perfect setting for the education of next-generation security experts and cryptography engineers. Typical applications of this research include embedded applications, smart cards (e.g., for identification and financial transactions), content delivery services (e.g., pay-perview audio/video), wireless networks etc. Current research interests of CRIS: Crypto for ultra-low power devices, Hardware security, Efficient arithmetic algorithms, Fault tolerant cryptography, Cryptography for network processors, Trust in IC design.

Embedded Computer Laboratory

Prof. Huang

The mission of the Embedded Computing Lab is to solve important problems of embedded computer systems, including theories, architectures, circuits, and systems. Our current research is focused on ASIC, FPGA and SoC design for signal processing, wireless communications, error correction coding, reconfigurable computing, and computing acceleration. Our research goal is to create new architectures and circuit designs to facilitate high-speed information processing at minimum power consumption.

Laboratory for Sensory and Physiologic Signal Processing – L(SP)2

Prof. Clancy

The mission of the Laboratory for Sensory and Physiologic Signal Processing L(SP)2 is to employ signal processing, mathematical modeling, and other electrical and computer engineering skills to study applications involving electromyography (EMG — the electrical activity of skeletal muscle). Researchers are improving the detection and interpretation of EMG for such uses as the control of powered prosthetic limbs, restoration of gait after stroke or traumatic brain injury, musculoskeletal modeling, and clinical/scientific assessment of neurologic function.

Precision Personnel Locator Project and Convergent Technologies Center (CTC)

Prof. Cyganski and Prof. Duckworth

The mission of the Precision Personnel Locator Project is to protect the lives of emergency responders and to enhance their ability to accomplish their missions through research and development of systems for personnel location and tracking, physiological status monitoring, environmental sensing, and command and control. This project brings together diverse technical capabilities from other centers and laboratories at WPI to address important problems for emergency responders, the most critical of which is precise location knowledge for each person. The primary center involved in the current work is the Convergent Technology Center (CTC). The Convergent Technology Center contributes expertise in advanced signal and image processing, information fusion, algorithm design, communication and computer networks. Another important aspect of this work is that, as an academic enterprise, this project involves graduate students as research assistants, and undergraduate students as summer interns. The opportunity for research and development at the state of the art in communications, computation, and positioning, is an unparalleled experience for our students.

Robotics and Intelligent Vehicles Research (RIVER) Laboratory

Prof. Padir

The Robotics and Intelligent Vehicles Research Laboratory (RIVeR Lab) at WPI was founded in 2010 by Professor Taskin Padir. Our research is aimed at advancing the capabilities of autonomous robots and intelligent vehicles. Research activities in the RIVeR Lab are centered around design, analysis, implementation and control of intelligent vehicles, mobile robots, walking robots, manipulators and adaptive systems. Aligned with WPI’s core values, Lehr and Kunst, excellence, close faculty/ student interaction, collaborative learning and research, respect for all members of the WPI community, our projects bring science and technology together with real-world problems. For more information, please visit the RIVeR Lab website.

RF-Electronic and Medical Imaging Laboratory

Prof. Ludwig

The RF-Electronics and Medical Imaging Laboratory uses clinical and animal research in such diverse fields as neurology and oncology. The lab has access to high-field and ultra high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems for use in functional and anatomical imaging. Major research focuses on visualization of elastic vibrations in the female breast. A novel coil geometry was designed that proved more efficient at generating these strong gradients when compared with conventional coil technology. Research has resulted in the design of special-purpose radio frequency array coil systems for breast cancer diagnosis, bone density determination, and stroke. The lab has successfully tested its single-tuned and dual-tuned prototypes at various sites throughout the U.S. in clinical MRI systems.

Signal Processing and Information Networking Laboratory (SPINLab)

Prof. Brown

SPINLab was established in 2002 to investigate fundamental and applied problems in signal processing, communication systems, and networking. Our current focus is on the development of network carrier synchronization schemes to facilitate distributed beamforming and space-time coded cooperative transmission. We are also working on techniques for optimal resource allocation in multiuser communication systems and the application of game-theoretic tools to analyze selfish behavior in cooperative communication systems. SPINLab offers research opportunities at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. For more details, please see the SPINLab Web page.

Ultrasound Research Laboratory

Prof. Pedersen

The mission of the Ultrasound Research Lab is to enable a wider use of medical ultrasound so that it can be used by medical personnel with modest training. To that end, we are developing a virtual reality reality based, low cost, yet realistic PC based system for providing training in the skills of ultrasound imaging. In addition, we have promising research in quantitative ultrasound elastography, in order to image in 2D and 3D the elastic rather than acoustic properties of soft tissue. To make the ultrasound image easier to interpret, we are developing image analysis algorithms, to aid the interpretation of the image for trauma situations. Complementing this work, we are implementing a mobile ultrasound imaging system, augmented with an exam camera and physiological sensors, with the ability to wirelessly stream ultrasound and visual images as well as voice over 3G phone networks. Finally, we have ongoing research atherosclerotic plaque classification.

Wireless Innovation Laboratory (WILab)

Prof. Wyglinski

The Wireless Innovation Laboratory (WILab) was established in 2007 in order to advance our understanding of technologies and algorithms that can help improve society’s usage of radio frequency spectrum for a wide range of wireless applications. Several research activities currently underway at WILab include the following: (1) Development and realization of high-speed spectrally agile waveforms for opportunistic spectrum access networks. (2) Implementation of practical wireless device optimization techniques for rapidly selecting near-optimal operating parameters to enhance overall system performance. (3) Prototyping of innovative and novel wireless networking system designs using software-defined radio development platforms. (4) Creation of novel distributed network architectures exploiting the agility of cognitive radios and the dynamic spectrum access paradigm. (5) Introduction of “learning” into cognitive radio platforms for complete automation of the operating parameter selection process. (6) Creation of vehicular communication network architectures that opportunistically seek out unoccupied frequency spectrum for performing secondary wireless transmissions. Research infrastructure for WILab consists of several high-performance computer workstations, sixteen software-defined radio development platforms, an Agilent CSA N1996A spectrum analyzer, an array of discone and horn antennas, and several simulation software packages. For more details, please see the WILab website.

 
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