Mechanical Engineering

ME 500. APPLIED ANALYTICAL METHODS

ME 501. ROBOT DYNAMICS

Foundations and principles of robotic manipulation. Topics include computational models of objects and motion, the mechanics of robotic manipulators, the structure of manipulator control systems, planning and programming of robot actions. The focus of this class is on the kinematics and programming of robotic mechanisms. Important topics also include the dynamics, control, sensor and effector design, and automatic planning methods for robots. The fundamental techniques apply to arms, mobile robots, active sensor platforms, and all other computer-controlled kinematic linkages. The primary applications include robotic arms and mobile robots and lab projects would involve programming of representative robots. An end of term team project would allow students to program robots to participate in challenges or competitions. (Prerequisite: RBE 500 or equivalent.)

ME 511. INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUID DYNAMICS

ME 513. THERMODYNAMICS

Review of the zeroth, first and second laws of thermodynamics and systems control volume. Applications of the laws to heat engines and their implications regarding the properties of materials. Equations of state and introduction to chemical thermodynamics.

ME 516. HEAT TRANSFER

Review of governing differential equations and boundary conditions for heat transfer analysis. Multidimensional and unsteady conduction, including effects of variable material properties. Analytical and numerical solution methods. Forced and free convection with laminar and turbulent flow in internal and external flows. Characteristics of radiant energy spectra and radiative properties of surfaces. Radiative heat transfer in absorbing and emitting media. Systems with combined conduction, convection and radiation. Condensation, evaporation, and boiling phenomena. (Prerequisite: Background in thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, ordinary and partial differential equations, and basic undergraduate physics.)

ME 522. MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

ME 527. DYNAMICS

ME 531. APPLIED ELASTICITY

This course is intended for students with undergraduate backgrounds in mechanics of materials. It includes two- and three-dimensional states of stress, linear and nonlinear measures of strain, and generalized Hooke?s Law. Also covered are exact solutions for bending and torsion: thick-walled pressure vessels, rotating disks, stress functions for two- and three-dimensional problems and bending and torsion of unsymmetric beams.

ME 542. CONTROL AND MONITORING OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

Covers a broad range of topics centered on control and monitoring functions for manufacturing, including process control, feedback systems, data collection and analysis, scheduling, machine-computer interfacing and distributed control. Typical applications are considered with lab work.

ME 543. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

The first half of the course covers the axiomatic design method, applied to simultaneous product and process design for concurrent engineering, with the emphasis on process and manufacturing tool design. Basic design principles as well as qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis of designs are developed. The second half of the course addresses methods of engineering analysis of manufacturing processes, to support machine tool and process design. Basic types of engineering analysis are applied to manufacturing situations, including elasticity, plasticity, heat transfer, mechanics and cost analysis. Special attention will be given to the mechanics of machining (traditional, nontraditional and grinding) and the production of surfaces. Students, work in groups on a series of projects.

ME 550. TISSUE ENGINEERING

This biomaterials course focuses on the selection, processing, testing and performance of materials used in biomedical applications with special emphasis upon tissue engineering. Topics include material selection and processing, mechanisms and kinetics of material degradation, cell-material interactions and interfaces; effect of construct architecture on tissue growth; and transport through engineered tissues. Examples of engineering tissues for replacing cartilage, bone, tendons, ligaments, skin and liver will be presented. (Recommended preparation: A first course in biomaterials equivalent to ME/BME 4814 and a basic understanding of physiology and cell biology.)

ME 591. GRADUATE SEMINAR

Seminars on current issues related to various areas of mechanical engineering are presented by authorities in their fields. All full-time mechanical engineering students are required to register and attend.

ME 593. SPECIAL TOPICS

Arranged by individual faculty with special expertise, these courses survey fundamentals in areas that are not covered by the regular mechanical engineering course offerings. Exact course descriptions are disseminated by the Mechanical Engineering Department well in advance of the offering. (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.) See the SUPPLEMENT section of the on-line catalog at www.wpi.edu/+gradcat for descriptions of courses to be offered in this academic year.

ME 594. DESIGN OF MANUFACTURING PROC

ME 613. TRANSPORT PHENOMENA

ME 621. DYNAMICS AND SIGNAL ANALYSIS

A laboratory-based course which applies Fourier and cepstral signal analysis techniques to mechanical engineering problems. The theory and application of the Fourier series, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and the cepstrum to the analysis of mechanical and acoustical systems is presented. Digital sampling theory, windowing, aliasing, filtering, noise averaging and deconvolution are discussed. Limitations of and errors in implementation of these techniques are demonstrated. Students will perform weekly experiments in the Structural Dynamics and Vibration Laboratory, which reinforce the theories presented in lectures. Application will include structures, acoustics, rotating machinery and cams.

ME 5000. APPLIED ANALYTICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING

The emphasis of this course is on the modeling of physical phenomena encountered in typical engineering problems, and on interpreting solutions in terms of the governing physics. In this manner, the course will expose students to a range of techniques that are useful to practicing engineers and researchers. Physical examples will be drawn from fluid mechanics, dynamics, and structural mechanics. The course will introduce analytical techniques as they are required to study such phenomena. Depending on the examples chosen, the techniques covered may include partial differential equations, power series, Fourier series, Fourier integrals, Laplace transform methods, Green's Functions, Sturm-Liouville theory, linear algebra, and calculus of variations. (Prerequisites: differential equations at the undergraduate level.) Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken either the Special Topics (ME 593A) version of the same course or ME 500.

ME 5001. APPLIED NUMERICAL METHODS IN ENGINEERING

A study of important numerical and computational methods for solving engineering science problems. The course will include methods for solving linear and nonlinear equations, interpolation strategies, evaluating integrals, and solving ordinary and partial differential equations. Finite difference methods will be developed in full for the solution of partial differential equations. The course materials emphasize the systematic generation of numerical methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic problems, and the analysis of their stability, accuracy, and convergence properties. The student will be required to write and run computer programs. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593M) version of the same course or ME 515.

ME 5100. INTRO TO NUMERICAL METHODS

ME 5101. ADVANCED FLUID DYNAMICS

An introduction to graduate level fluid dynamics. Topics covered include: concept of continuum; the conservation equations for systems and control volumes; the Navier-Stokes equations; unidirectional steady and transient flows; vorticity dynamics and rotating flows; laminar boundary layers; separation; potential flows; introduction to turbulence; Stokes flow; lubrication flow; surface tension and surface driven flows. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593F) version of the same course or ME 511.

ME 5102. ADVANCED GAS DYNAMICS

An introduction to kinetic theory of gases and its application to equilibrium flows and flows with chemical, vibrational and translational nonequilibrium. Topics in kinetic theory also include the Boltzmann Equation and its relation to the continuum equations of gas dynamics. A major focus of the course is exploring how results for equilibrium flow of a perfect gas (e.g. flows in nozzles, normal and oblique shocks, expansion waves) are modified for an imperfect gas with nonequilibrium. The models of flow with nonequilibrium are then applied to the study of different flows of engineering interest including hypersonic flows (e.g. re-entry vehicles), propagating shock waves (explosions), and chemically reacting flows. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593G) version of the same course or ME 512.

ME 5103. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

Computational methods for incompressible and compressible viscous flows. Navier Stokes equations in general coordinates and grid generation techniques. Finite volume techniques including discretization, stability analysis, artificial viscosity, explicit and implicit methods, flux-vector splitting, Monotonic advection schemes and multigrid methods. Parallel computing. (Prerequisite: Fluid dynamics and introductory course in numerical methods.) Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593P) version of the same course or ME 612.

ME 5104. TURBOMACHINERY

This course is an introduction to the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of turbomachinery for propulsion and power generation applications. Axial and centrifugal compressors will be discussed as well as axial and radial flow turbines. Analysis of the mean line flow in compressor and turbine blade rows and stages will be discussed. The blade-to- blade flow model will be presented and axisymmetric flow theory introduced. Three-dimensional flow, i.e. secondary flows, will also be discussed. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593H) version of the same course.

ME 5105. RENEWABLE ENERGY

The course provides an introduction to renewable energy, outlining the challenges in meeting the energy needs of humanity and exploring possible solutions in some detail. Specific topics include: use of energy and the correlation of energy use with the prosperity of nations; historical energy usage and future energy needs; engineering economics; electricity generation from the wind; wave/ocean energy, geo-thermal and solar-thermal energy; overview of fuel cells, biofuels, nuclear energy, and solar-photovoltaic systems and their role and prospects; distribution of energy and the energy infrastructure; energy for transportation; energy storage. Pre-requisites; ES 3001, ES 3004 or equivalents. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593R) version of the same course.

ME 5106. INTRO TO PLASMA DYNAMICS

ME 5110. INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA DYNAMICS

The course introduces concepts of partially ionized gases (plasmas) and their role in a wide range of science and engineering fields. Fundamental theory includes topics in: equilibrium of ionized gases and kinetic theory; motion of charged particles in electromagnetic fields; elastic and inelastic collisions, cross sections and transport processes; fluid theory and magnetohydrodynamic models; sheaths. Applications cover areas such as plasma diagnostics, plasma discharges, acecraft/environment interactions, and plasma-aided material processing.

ME 5111. SPACECRAFT PROPULSION

This course provides students with the background and theory needed to evaluate the performance of the most commonly used electric and chemical spacecraft propulsion systems. Electrostatic ion and Hall thruster theory, design, and operation are covered including theory and operation of hollow cathodes, plasma generation and ion acceleration (including design of ion optics), magnetic field design, and beam neutralization. Topics in chemical propulsion include bipropellant and monopropellant chemistry (adiabatic flame temperature and ideal performance) with a focus on catalyst-bed and nozzle design considerations. Discussion of each class of thruster will be supplemented with specific examples of flight hardware.

ME 5200. MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

The course provides fundamentals for vibration an alysis of linear discrete and continuous dynamic systems. A vibrating system is first modeled mathematically as an initial value problem (IVP) or a boundary-initial value problem (BIVP) by the Newton-D?Alembert method and/or the Lagrange energy approach and then solved for various types of system. Explicit solutions for dynamic response of a linear single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system, both damped and undamped, is derived for free-vibration caused by the initial conditions and forced vibration caused by different excitations. Modal analysis is presented to solve for vibration response of both multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems and continuous systems with distributed parameters. As the basis of modal analysis, the natural frequencies and vibration modes of a linear dynamic system are obtained in advance by solving an associated generalized eigenvalue problem and the orthogonal properties of the vibration modes with respect to the stiffness and mass matrices are strictly proved. Computational methods for vibration analysis are introduced. Applications include but are not limited to cushion design of falling packages, vehicles traveling on a rough surface, multi-story building subjected to seismic and wind loading, and vibration analysis of bridges subjected to traffic loading. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593V) version of the same course or ME 522.

ME 5202. ADVANCED DYNAMICS

Basic concepts and general principles of classical kinematics and dynamics of particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies are presented with application to engineering problems with complicated three-dimensional kinematics and dynamics. Derivation of the governing equations of motion using Principle of Virtual Work and Lagrange equations is described together with the direct Newton approach. Applications include: swings-effect and its use in engineering, illustrating in particular limit cycles and their stability and reversed-swings control of vibrations of pendulum; various examples of gyroscopic effects; and especially introductory rotordynamics including transverse vibrations (whirling) and potential instability of rotating shafts. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593D) version of the same course or ME 527.

ME 5203. INTRODUCTION TO CONTROL OF NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

Introduction to nonlinear dynamical systems. Overview of stability concepts and examination of various methods for assessing stability such as linearization and Lyapunov methods. Introduction to various design methods based on linearization, sliding modes, adaptive control, and feedback linearization. Demonstration and performance analysis on engineering systems such as flexible robotic manipulators, mobile robots, spacecraft attitude control and manufacturing systems. Control synthesis and analysis is performed using Matlab?/Simulink?. (Prerequisites: differential equations, fundamentals of linear algebra and concepts of control theory at the undergraduate level.) Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME 623.

ME 5204. MULTI-ROBOT SYSTEMS

This course covers the foundation and principles of multi-robot systems. The course will cover the development of the field and provide an overview on different control architectures (deliberative, reactive, behavior-based and hybrid control), control topologies, and system configurations (cellular automata, modular robotic systems, mobile sensor networks, swarms, heterogeneous systems). Topics may include, but are not limited to, multi-robot control and connectivity, path planning and localization, sensor fusion and robot informatics, task-level control, and robot software system design and implementation. These topics will be pursued through independent reading, class discussion, and a course project. The course will culminate in a group project focusing on a collaborative/cooperative multi-robot system. The project may be completed through simulation or hands-on experience with available robotic platforms. Groups will present their work and complete two professional-quality papers in IEEE format. (Prerequisites: Linear algebra, differential equations, linear systems, controls, and mature programming skills, or consent of the instructor.) Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593S) version of the same course.

ME 5205. BIOMEDICAL ROBOTICS

This course will provide an overview of a multitude of biomedical applications of robotics. Applications covered include: image-guided surgery, percutaneous therapy, localization, robot-assisted surgery, simulation and augmented reality, laboratory and operating room automation, robotic rehabilitation, and socially assistive robots. Specific subject matter includes: medical imaging, coordinate systems and representations in 3D space, robot kinematics and control, validation, haptics, teleoperation, registration, calibration, image processing, tracking, and human-robot interaction. Topics will be discussed in lecture format followed by interactive discussion of related literature. The course will culminate in a team project covering one or more of the primary course focus areas. Recommended background: Linear algebra, ME/ RBE 501 or equivalent. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593U) version of the same course.

ME 5220. CONTROL OF LINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

This course covers analysis and synthesis of control laws for linear dynamical systems. Fundamental concepts including canonical representations, the state transition matrix, and the properties of controllability and observability will be discussed. The existence and synthesis of stabilizing feedback control laws using pole placement and linear quadratic optimal control will be discussed. The design of Luenberger observers and Kalman filters will be introduced. Examples pertaining to aerospace engineering, such as stability analysis and augmentation of longitudinal and lateral aircraft dynamics, will be considered. Assignments and term project (if any) will focus on the design, analysis, and implementation of linear control for current engineering problems. The use of Matlab?/Simulink? for analysis and design will be emphasized. Recommended background: Familiarity with ordinarydifferential equations,introductorycontrol theory, fundamentals of linear algebra, and the analysis of signals and systems is recommended. Familiarity with Matlab? is strongly recommended. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME 523.

ME 5221. CONTROL OF NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

Overview of stability concepts and examination of various methods for assessing stability such as linearization and Lyapunov methods. Introduction to various design methods based on linearization, sliding modes, adaptive control, and feedback linearization. Demonstration and performance analysis on engineering systems such as flexible robotic manipulators, mobile robots, spacecraft attitude control and aircraft control systems. Control synthesis and analysis is performed using Matlab?/Simulink?. Prerequisites: Familiarity with ordinary differential equations, introductory control theory at the undergraduate level, fundamentals of linear algebra. Familiarity with Matlab? is strongly recommended. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME 5203.

ME 5222. OPTIMAL CONTROL OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

This course covers the synthesis of optimal control laws for linear and nonlinear dynamical systems. Necessary conditions for optimal control based on the Pontryagin Minimum Principle will be introduced, and cases of fixed and free terminal time and boundary conditions will be discussed. Feedback optimal control will be discussed, and the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation will be introduced. The special case of linear quadratic optimal control will be discussed. Examples throughout the course will be based on air-and-space vehicle applications, such as flight trajectory optimization. Assignments and term project (if any) will introduce basic numerical techniques, and introduce software packages for optimal control. Prequisites: Fluency with the theory of linear dynamical systems and control is required. Familiarity with MATLAB. Familiarity with air-and-space vehicledynamics is beneficial, but not necessary.

ME 5223. SPACE VEHICLE DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

Overview of spacecraft rotational motion. Stability analysis of forced and torque-free spacecraft motion. Effects of space environment and man-made torques on motion stability. Examination of orbital and attitude motion coupling. Theoretical formulation of spacecraft formation flying. Review of current trends in networked miniaturized spacecraft. Overview and sizing of actuating devices such as gas jet, electric thrusters, momentum wheels and magnetic torquers. Overview and selection of sensing devices such as sun sensors, magnetometers, GPS, IMUs. Formulation of spacecraft maneuvers as control design problems. Case studies on feedback attitude regulators and algorithms for linear and nonlinear attitude tracking. Design and realization of attitude control schemes using Matlab?/Simulink?. Prerequisites: Fundamentals of spacecraft orbital motion and attitude dynamics at the undergraduate level. Familiarity with state space and frequency domain control concepts such as stability, controllability and observability. Familiarity with Lyapunov-based stability analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems. Familiarity with Matlab?.

ME 5224. AIR VEHICLE DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

This course covers the fundamentals of the dynamics of rigid bodies and their motion under the influence of aerodynamic and gravitational forces. General equations of aircraft motion will be developed, followed by concepts of static and dynamic stability. Trim and linearization will be discussed, and the stability analysis of lateral and longitudinal modes in the linearized equations will be introduced. Stability augmentation via feedback control will be discussed. Aspects of aircraft navigation, guidance, and flight trajectory optimization will also be introduced. Prerequisites: Familiarity with the kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies is required. Familiarity with ordinary differential equations is recommended. Familiarity with aircraft dynamics and control at the undergraduate level is beneficial, but not necessary.

ME 5303. APPLIED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS IN ENGINEERING

This course is devoted to the numerical solution of partial differential equations encountered in engineering sciences. Finite element methods are introduced and developed in a logical progression of complexity. Topics covered include matrix structural analysis variation form of differential equations, Ritz and weighted residual approximations, and development of the discretized domain solution. Techniques are developed in detail for the one- and two-dimensional equilibrium and transient problems. These numerical strategies are used to solve actual problems in heat flow, diffusion, wave propagation, vibrations, fluid mechanics, hydrology and solid mechanics. Weekly computer exercises are required to illustrate the concepts discussed in class. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593E) version of the same course or ME 533 or CE 524.

ME 5304. LASER METROLOGY AND NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING

Demands for increased performance and efficiency of components in the nano/micro-, meso-, and macro-scales, impose challenges to their engineering design, study, and optimization. These challenges are compounded by multidisciplinary applications to be developed inexpensively in short time while satisfying stringent design objectives. As a consequence, effective quantitative engineering methodologies, such as optical techniques, are frequently used in the study and optimization of advanced components and systems. In this course, modern laser metrology techniques are discussed and their practical applications to solve problems, with emphasis on nondestructive testing (NDT), are illustrated with laboratory demonstrations. Topics covered include wave and Fourier optics, classic and holographic interferometry, speckle techniques, solid-state lasers, fiber optics, CCD cameras, computer vision, camera calibration methods, and image processing and data reduction algorithms as required in quantitative fringe analysis. Detail examples of nondestructive testing and coherent optical metrology in solid mechanics, vibrations, heat transfer, electromagnetics, and reverse engineering are given. Students are required to work on projects depending on their background and interests. Recommended background: mechanics, materials, physics, knowledge of a high-level computer programming language. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593J) version of the same course or ME 534.

ME 5310. PRINCIPLES OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

This course provides a comprehensive review of the fundamental principles of materials science and engineering. The classical interplay among structure-processing-properties-performance in materials including plastics, metals, ceramics, glasses and composites will be emphasized. The structure in materials ranging from the subatomic to the macroscopic, including nano-, micro- and macromolecular structures, will be discussed to highlight bonding mechanisms, crystallinity and defect patterns. Representative thermodynamic and kinetic aspects such as diffusion, phase diagrams, nucleation and growth, and TTT diagrams will be discussed. Basics of elasticity, plastic deformation and viscoelasticity will be highlighted. Salient aspects pertaining to the corrosion and environmental degradation of materials will be discussed. This course will provide the background for students in any engineering or science major for future course and research work in materials. (Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing in engineering or science.)

ME 5311. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS

This course, (along with its companion course MTE 512 Properties and Performance of Engineering Materials), is designed to provide a comprehensive review of the fundamental principles of Materials Science and Engineering for incoming graduate students. In the first part of this 2-set sequence, the structure in materials ranging from the sub-atomic to the macroscopic including nano, micro and macromolecular structures will be discussed to highlight bonding mechanisms, crystallinity and defect patterns. Representative thermodynamic and kinetic aspects such as diffusion, phase diagrams, nucleation and growth and TTT diagrams will be discussed. Major structural parameters that effect of performance in materials including plastics, metallic alloys, ceramics and glasses will be emphasized. The principal processing techniques to shape materials and the effects of processing on structure will be highlighted. (Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing or consent of the instructor.) Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course (MTE 594S).

ME 5312. PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS

The two introductory classes on materials science (MTE511 and MTE512) describe the structure-property relationships in materials. In MTE511, the principal structural parameters in metals, ceramics, glasses and plastics were highlighted. The effects of processing on the structure were also discussed. The purpose of this class is to provide a basic knowledge of the principles pertaining to the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of materials. The primary focus of this class will be on mechanical properties. The thermal, tensile, compressive, flexural and shear properties of metallic alloys, ceramics and glasses and plastics will be discussed. Fundamental aspects of fracture mechanics and viscoelasticity will be presented. An overview of dynamic properties such as fatigue, impact and creep will be provided. The relationship between the structural parameters and the preceding mechanical properties will be described. Basic composite theories will be presented to describe fiber-reinforced composites and nanocomposites. Various factors associated with material degradation during use will be discussed. Some introductory definitions of electrical and optical properties will be outlined. (Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing or consent of the instructor.) Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course (MTE594P).

ME 5326. ADVANCED THERMODYNAMICS

Thermodynamics of solutions?phase equilibria? Ellingham diagrams, binary and ternary phase diagrams, reactions between gasses and condensed phases, reactions within condensed phases, thermodynamics of surfaces, defects and electrochemistry. Applications to materials processing and degradation will be presented and discussed. (Prerequisites: ES 3001, ES2001) Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course (MTE594T).

ME 5332. X-RAY DIFFRACTION AND CRYSTALLOGRAPHY

This course discusses the fundamentals of crystallography and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of metals, ceramics and polymers. It introduces graduate students to the main issues and techniques of diffraction analysis as they relate to materials. The techniques for the experimental phase identification and determination of phase fraction via XRD will be reviewed. Topics covered include: basic X-ray physics, basic crystallography, fundamentals of XRD, XRD instrumentation and analysis techniques. (Prerequisites: ES 2001 or equivalent, and senior or graduate standing in engineering or science.) Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course (MTE594C).

ME 5340. ANALYTICAL METHODS IN MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Heat transfer and diffusion kinetics are applied to the solution of materials engineering problems. Mathematical and numerical methods for the solutions to Fourier?s and Pick?s laws for a variety of boundary conditions will be presented and discussed. The primary emphasis is given heat treatment and surface modification processes. Topics to be covered include solutionizing, quenching, and carburization heat treatment. (Prerequisites: ME 4840 or MTE 510 or equivalent.)

ME 5347. MTRLS FR ELECTROCHEM ENRGY SYS

ME 5350. PHASE TRANSFORMTN IN MATERIALS

This course is intended to provide a fundamental understanding of thermodynamic and kinetic principles associated with phase transformations. The mechanisms of phase transformations will be discussed in terms of driving forces to establish a theoretical background for various physical phenomena. The principles of nucleation and growth and spinodal transformations will be described. The theoretical analysis of diffusion controlled and interface controlled growth will be presented . The basic concepts of martensitic transformations will be highlighted. Specific examples will include solidification, crystallization, precipitation, sintering, phase separation and transformation toughening. (Prerequisites: MTE 510, ME 4850 or equivalent.)

ME 5356. SMART MATERIALS

A material whose properties can respond to an external stimulus in a controlled fashion is referred to as a smart or intelligent material. These materials can be made to undergo changes modulus, shape, porosity, electrical conductivity, physical form, opacity, and magnetic properties based on an external stimulus. The stimuli can include temperature, pH, specific molecules, light, magnetic field, voltage and stress. These stimuli-sensitive materials can be utilized as sensors and as vehicles for the controlled delivery of drugs and other biomolecules in medical applications. Smart materials are also becoming important in other biological areas such as bio-separation, biosensor design, tissue engineering, protein folding, and microfluidics. The use of stimuli-sensitive materials is receiving increasing attention in the development of damage tolerant smart structures in aerospace, marine, automotive and earth quake resistant buildings. The use of smart materials is being explored for a range of applications including protective coatings, corrosion barriers, intelligent batteries, fabrics and food packaging. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the various types of smart materials including polymers, ceramic, metallic alloys and composites. Fundamental principles associated with the onset of ?smart? property will be highlighted. The principles of self-healable materials based on smart materials will be discussed. The application of smart materials in various fields including sensors, actuators, diagnostics, therapeutics, packaging and other advanced applications will be presented. Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course.

ME 5358. PLASTICS

This course will provide an integrated overview of the design, selection and use of synthetic plastics. The basic chemistry associated with polymerization and the structure of commercial plastics will be described. Various aspects of polymer crystallization and glass transition will be outlined. Salient aspects of fluid flow and heat transfer during the processing of plastics will be highlighted. Fundamentals of the diverse processing operations used to shape plastics and the resulting structures that develop after processing will be discussed. The mechanical behavior of plastics including elastic deformation, rubber elasticity, yielding, viscoelasticity, fracture and creep will be discussed. Plastic degradation and environmental issues associated with recycling and disposal of plastics will be examined. Typical techniques used in the analysis and testing of plastics will be described and a working knowledge of various terminologies used in commercial practice will be provided. Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course (MTE 594A).

ME 5361. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR AND FRACTURE OF MATERIALS

The failure and wear-out mechanisms for a variety of materials (metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and microelectronics) and applications will be presented and discussed. Multi-axial failure theories and fracture mechanics will be discussed. The methodology and techniques for reliability analysis will also be presented and discussed. A materials systems approach will be used. (Prerequisites: ES 2502 and ME 3023 or equivalent, and senior or graduate standing in engineering or science.) Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course (MTE593C/MTE594C).

ME 5370. SURFACE METROLOGY

This course emphasizes research applications of advanced surface metrology, including the measurement and analysis of surface roughness. Surface metrology can be important in a wide variety of situations including adhesion, friction, catalysis, heat transfer, mass transfer, scattering, biological growth, wear and wetting. These situations impact practically all the engineering disciplines and sciences. The course begins by considering basic principles and conventional analyses, and methods. Measurement and analysis methods are critically reviewed for utility. Students learn advanced methods for differentiating surface textures that are suspected of being different because of their performance or manufacture. Students will also learn methods for making correlations between surface textures and behavioral and manufacturing parameters. The results of applying these methods can be used to support the design and manufacture of surface textures, and to address issues in quality assurance. Examples of research from a broad range of applications are presented, including, food science, pavements, friction, adhesion, machining and grinding. Students do a major project of their choosing, which can involve either an in-depth literature review, or surface measurement and analysis. The facilities of WPI?s Surface Metrology Laboratory are available for making measurements for selected projects. Software for advanced analysis methods is also available for use in the course. No previous knowledge of surface metrology is required. Students should have some background in engineering, math or science.

ME 5380. FOUNDATIONS OF ELASTICITY

This course is suitable as an introductory graduate level course. Topics will be chosen from the following: three-dimensional states of stress; measures of strain; thick-walled cylinders, disks and spheres; plane stress and plane strain; thermoelasticity; Airy stress function; energy methods, and exact theory for torsion of non-circular cross sections. This course may be taken independent of ME 5302. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME 531.

ME 5381. APPLIED ELASTICITY

This course is suitable as an introductory graduate level course. Topics covered will be chosen from the following: bending and shear stresses in unsymmetric beams; bending of composite beams; bending of curved beams; torsion of thin-walled noncircular cross sections; beams on elastic foundations; stress concentrations; failure criteria; stability of columns; and bending of plates. This course may be taken independent of ME 5301. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME531.

ME 5382. AEROELASTICITY

ME 5401. COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN AND GEOMETRIC MODELING

This course covers topics in computer-aided geometric design and applications in mechanical engineering. The objectives of the course are to familiarize the students with complex geometric modeling and analytical techniques used in contemporary computer-aided design systems. Topics to be covered may include complex curve and surface generation, solid modeling, assembly and mechanism modeling, transformations, analytic geometry, offsets and intersections of complex shapes, graphics standards and data transfer, rendering techniques, parametric design and geometric optimization, numerical methods for geometric analysis and graphics design programming. Prerequisites: calculus, linear algebra, introductory computer programming, and ability to utilize a solid modeling CAD system. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593C) version of the same course or ME 545.

ME 5431. COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING

An overview of computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM). As the CIM concept attempts to integrate all of the business and engineering functions of a firm, this course builds on the knowledge of computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, concurrent engineering, management of information systems and operations management to demonstrate the strategic importance of integration. Emphasis is placed on CAD/CAM integration. Topics include, part design specification and manufacturing quality, tooling and fixture design, and manufacturing information systems. This course includes a group term project. (Prerequisites: Background in manufacturing and CAD/CAM, e.g., ME 1800, ES 1310, ME 3820.) Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course (MFE593D/MFE594D).

ME 5441. DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURABILITY

The problems of cost determination and evaluation of processing alternatives in the design-manufacturing interface are discussed. Approaches for introducing manufacturing capability knowledge into the product design process are covered. An emphasis is placed on part and process simplification, and analysis of alternative manufacturing methods based on such parameters as: anticipated volume, product life cycle, lead time, customer requirements, and quality yield. Lean manufacturing and Six-Sigma concepts and their influence on design quality are included as well. Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics version of the same course (MFE594M).

ME 5841. SURFACE METROLOGY

This course emphasizes research applications of advanced surface metrology, including the measurement and analysis of surface roughness. Surface metrology can be important in a wide variety of situations including adhesion, friction, catalysis, heat transfer, mass transfer, scattering, biological growth, wear and wetting. These situations impact practically all the engineering disciplines and sciences. The course begins by considering basic principles and conventional analyses, and methods. Measurement and analysis methods are critically reviewed for utility. Students learn advanced methods for differentiating surface textures that are suspected of being different because of their performance or manufacture. Students will also learn methods for making correlations between surface textures and behavioral and manufacturing parameters. The results of applying these methods can be used to support the design and manufacture of surface textures, and to address issues in quality assurance. Examples of research from a broad range of applications are presented, including, food science, pavements, friction, adhesion, machining and grinding. Students do a major project of their choosing, which can involve either an in-depth literature review, or surface measurement and analysis. The facilities of WPI?s Surface Metrology Laboratory are available for making measurements for selected projects. Software for advanced analysis methods is also available for use in the course. No previous knowledge of surface metrology is required. Students should have some background in engineering, math or science.

ME 5847. ELECTROCHEMICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS

ME 6201. ADVANCED TOPICS IN VIBRATION

The course presents advanced topics in vibrations of machines and structures: dynamic stability analysis for linear nonconservative systems with applications to aeroelasticity and rotordynamics such as whirling of shafts with internal energy dissipation; introduction into theory of nonlinear and parametric vibrations in machines and structures; probabilistic approach in dynamics ? analysis of random vibrations with applications to reliability evaluation in earthquake engineering, off shore engineering, etc. Use of random vibration analyses is illustrated for on-line condition monitoring for machines and structures (mechanical signature analysis), such as detecting instability and evaluating stability margin for a nonconservative system from its on-line measured signal. Introduction into general vibration theory makes the course self-contained (background in ME 522 preferable but not necessary). Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593B) version of the same course.

ME 50001. APPLD NUMERICL METHDS IN ENGIN

 
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