Aerospace Engineering

AE 2550. ATMOSPHERIC AND SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

This course introduces the ambient atmospheric and space environments encountered by aerospace vehicles. Topics include: the sun and solar activity; the solar wind; planetary magnetospheres; planetary atmospheres; radiation environments; galactic cosmic rays; meteoroids; and space debris. Recommended background: mechanics (PH1110 / 1111 or equivalent), electromagnetism (PH 1120 / 1121 or equivalent), and ordinary differential equations (MA 2051 or equivalent).

AE 2713. ASTRONAUTICS

Cat. I An introductory course that covers the fundamentals of space flight, spacecraft trajectory analysis and mission design. Topics studied: orbital mechanics; geocentric orbits and trajectories; interplanetary transfers; ambient space environments for geocentric orbits and interplanetary transfers; introduction to spacecraft and mission design. Recommended background: dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

AE 3410. COMPRESSIBLE FLUID DYNAMICS

Cat. I In this course, students are introduced to various compressibility phenomena such as compression (shock) and expansion waves. Conservation laws and thermodynamic principles are applied to the description of flows in which compressibility effects are significant. One-dimensional models are applied to analysis of flow in variable area ducts, normal and oblique shock waves, expansion waves, and flows with friction and heat addition. Numerous applications from engineering are investigated including supersonic inlets, rocket nozzles, supersonic wind tunnels, gas delivery systems, and afterburning jet engines. Recommended background: thermodynamics (ES 3001, CH 3510 or equivalent), fluid dynamics (ES 3004 or equivalent).

AE 3602. INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS

Cat. I This course covers inviscid and viscous incompressible fluid dynamics at an intermediate level. Topics include: fluid kinematics and deformation; integral conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy for finite systems and control volumes; differential conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy; the Navier-Stokes equations and solution methods; the incompressible Euler equations and Bernoulli?s equation; the streamfunction and the velocity potential; incompressible, inviscid, irrotational flow theory and solution methodology; elementary potential flows, the superposition principle and its applications to flows over solid bodies; two-dimensional incompressible, viscous boundary layer, Prandtl?s theory, the Blasius solution and it?s application; other analytical solutions for two-dimensional viscous and inviscid incompressible channel flows. Recommended background: thermodynamics (ES 3001, CH 3510 or equivalent), fluid dynamics (ES 3004 or equivalent).

AE 3703. INTRODUCTION TO CONTROL OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

Cat. I The course introduces the mathematical modeling and control of dynamical systems found in aerospace and mechanical engineering applications. Topics include: introduction to feedback control analysis and synthesis of linear dynamic systems; transient response analysis of first and second order systems (thermal, pneumatic, hydraulic, and mechanical); introduction to state-space modeling and representation of control systems; linearization of nonlinear systems; stability analysis using Routh?s criterion and Lyapunov methods; system analysis using frequency response methods; introduction to the design of controlers in time and frequency domain. The analysis and design will be accomplished with Matlab/Simulink? software. Recommended background: ordinary differential equations (MA 2051 or equivalent), dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201, PH 2202 or equivalent), fluid dynamics (ES3004, AE/ME 3602 or equivalent), electricity and magnetism (PH 1120 or PH 1121 or equivalent)

AE 3711. AERODYNAMICS

Cat. I This course introduces students to the aerodynamics of airfoils, wings, and aircraft in the subsonic and supersonic regimes. Topics covered include: prediction of aerodynamic forces (lift, drag) and moments, dynamic similarity, experimental techniques in aerodynamics, Kutta-Joukowski theorem, circulation, thin airfoil theory, panel methods, finite wing theory, subsonic compressible flow over airfoils, linearized supersonic flow, and viscous flow over airfoils. Recommended background: incompressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3602 or equivalent).

AE 3712. AEROSPACE STRUCTURES

Cat. I This is a course in solid mechanics that covers stress analysis of aerospace structures. It begins with an overview of stress, strain, three-dimensional elasticity theory, and stress-strain relations for an isotropic materials. Applied topics include general torsion of solid noncircular cross sections, torsion of thin walled multi-celled members, bidirectional bending of unsymmetric cross sections, flexural shear flow in and shear center of thin walled multi-celled members, and buckling and stability of columns. Recommended background: Stress Analysis (ES 2502 or equivalent.)

AE 4710. GAS TURBINES FOR PROPULSION AND POWER GENERATION

Cat. I This course provides a study of open-cycle and closed-cycle gas turbines. Topics covered include: thermodynamic cycles and fluid dynamics of airbreathing gas turbines (turbojets, turbofans, turboprops), ramjets, and scramjets; thermodynamic cycles and fluid dynamics of closed-cycle gas turbines. Performance of specific engine components such as inlets, combustors, nozzles, as well as axial compressors and turbines will be addressed. Recommended background: compressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3410 or equivalent).

AE 4712. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

This course introduces the analysis of vibrations of flexible bodies encountered as elements of aircraft and space structures. Topics include: modal analysis for determining structural response to forced vibrations; vibrations of strings and rods; free and forced vibrations of beams and plates. Recommended background: ordinary differential equations (MA 2051 or equivalent), dynamics (ES2503, PH 2201, PH2202 or equivalent), aerospace structures (AE/ME 3712 or equivalent).

AE 4713. SPACECRAFT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

Cat. I. The course covers broad topics in spacecraft attitude dynamics, stability and control. The course includes a review of particle and two-body dynamics and introduction to rigid body dynamics. Orbital and attitude maneuvers are presented. Attitude control devices and momentum exchange techniques such as spinners, dual spinners, gravity gradient, and geomagnetic torques are presented. Attitude sensors/actuators are presented and the attitude control problem is introduced. Gyroscopic instruments are introduced and demonstrated in the laboratory. Open-loop stability analysis for a variety of equilibrium conditions is discussed. Control using momentum exchange and mass expulsion (thrusters) devices is discussed. Recommended background: astronautics (ME 2713 or equivalent), dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

AE 4718. ADVANCED MATERIALS WITH AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS

Cat. I This course covers topics on the design, fabrication and behavior of advanced materials used in structural and propulsion components of aerospace vehicles. The design, fabrication, and properties of polymer, metal and ceramic matrix composites used in aerospace structures are presented. The fabrication and behavior of aluminum and titanium alloys used in propulsion components as well as the processing and performance of Nickel-based superalloys are also presented. The fundamentals of coatings for high temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and thermal protection are introduced. Recommended background: Introduction to Materials Science (ES 2001), Stress Analysis (ES 2502) or equivalent.

AE 4719. ROCKET PROPULSION

Cat. I This course provides a study of rocket propulsion systems for launch vehicles and spacecraft. Dynamics, performance and optimization of rocket-propelled vehicles are presented. Performance and component analysis of chemical and electric propulsion systems are covered including thermochemistry of bipropellant and monopropellant thrusters. Additional topics may include advanced propulsion concepts and propellant storage and feed systems. Recommended background: compressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3410 or equivalent).

AE 4723. AIRECRAFT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

Cat. I The goal of this course is for students to develop, analyze, and utilize models of aircraft dynamics, and to study various aircraft control systems. Topics include: review of linear systems, longitudinal and lateral flight dynamics, simulation methodologies, natural modes of motion, static and dynamic aircraft stability, and aircraft control systems (such as autopilot design, flight path control, and automatic landing). Other topics may include: vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) vehicles and rotorcraft. Recommended background: dynamics (ES2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

AE 4733. GUIDANCE, NAVIGATION AND COMMUNICATION

Cat. I This course broadly covers methods and current enabling technologies in the analysis, synthesis and practice of aerospace guidance, navigation, and communication and information systems. Topics covered include: position fixing and celestial navigation with redundant measurements, recursive navigation, and Kalman filtering; inertial navigation systems, global position systems, and Doppler navigation; orbit determination; atmospheric re-entry; communication architectures, data rates, and communication link design; tropospheric and ionospheric effects on radio-wave propagation; pursuit guidance and ballistic flight. Recommended background: Controls (AE/ME 3703, ES 3011 or equivalent).

AE 4770. AIRCRAFT DESIGN

Cat. I This course introduces students to design of aircraft systems. Students complete a conceptual design of an aircraft in a term-long project. Students are exposed to the aircraft design process, and must establish design specifications, develop and analyze alternative designs, and optimize their designs to meet mission requirements. Students work together in teams to apply material learned in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials, propulsion, stability and control, and flight mechanics and maneuvers to the preliminary design of an aircraft. The project requirements are selected to reflect real-life aircraft mission requirements, and teams are required to design systems which incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. The teams present their design in a final report and oral presentation. Recommended background: fluid dynamics (ME 3410, ME 3602 or equivalent), subsonic aerodynamics (ME 3711 or equivalent), aerospace structures (ME 3712 or equivalent), airbreathing propulsion (ME 4710 or equivalent), aircraft dynamics and control (AE/ME 4723 or equivalent).

AE 4771. SPACECRAFT AND MISSION DESIGN

Cat. I This course introduces students to design of spacecraft and missions. Students are introduced to the process of designing a spacecraft and major subsystems to meet a specific set of objectives or needs. In addition, students will learn about different spacecraft subsystems and what factors drive their design. Particular emphasis is given to propulsion, power, attitude control, structural and thermal control subsystems. Students work together in teams to apply material learned in the areas of orbital mechanics, space environments, attitude determination and control, space structures, and propulsion to the preliminary design of a spacecraft and mission. The project requirements are selected to reflect real-life missions, and teams are required to design systems which incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. The teams present their design in a final report and oral presentation. Recommended background: astronautics (AE 2713 or equivalent), rocket propulsion (AE 4719 or equivalent), spacecraft dynamics and control (AE 4713 or equivalent).

 
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