Art History/Architecture

AR 120X. VIDEO PRODUCTION

This course will introduce students to concepts and techniques for live action digital filmmaking. Topics will include constructing a visual narrative, principles of cinematography, visual and audio editing, working with actors, and the stylistic elements of various genres of filmmaking. Note: students interested in this course are advised to consider Film Studies (HU 225X), which provides a complementary theoretical approach to the language of film. The courses may be taken in either order.

AR 130X. GRAPHIC DESIGN

This course introduces design principles and their application to create effective forms of graphic communication. The students will learn the fundamentals of visual communication and will work on projects to analyze, organize, and solve design problems. Topics may include: the design process; figure/ground; shape; dynamic balance; Gestalt principles; typography; layout and composition; color; production and presentation in digital formats.

AR 300X. INTER-MEDIA ELECTRONIC ARTS

This course will introduce students to techniques and processes for the creation of real-time, interactive works of art. Students will learn to use electronic sensors and other tools for audio and video processing, as well as designing customized software interfaces to create interactive artworks that respond to users and their environment. The course will introduce students to the work of significant contemporary arts practitioners as well as their historical precedents, with a special emphasis on inter-media works that bridge visual art, music composition, and the performing arts. Topics may include electronic musical instruments and performance interfaces, VJing, electronically-augmented dance, controller hacking, wired clothing, networked collaboration and mobile media, and algorithmic and generative art. Recommended Background: AR 1101 (DIGITAL IMAGING AND COMPUTER ART), video production (IMGD 2005 MACHINIMA: FILM MAKING IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS), digital audio/music (MU 3611 COMPUTER TECHNIQUES IN MUSIC, MU 3612 COMPUTERS AND SYNTHESIZERS IN MUSIC, MU 3613 DIGITAL SOUND DESIGN, IMGD 203x INTRO TO GAME AUDIO), an introductory programming course (CS 1101 INTRO TO PROGRAM DESIGN, CS 1102 ACCELERATED INTRO TO PROGRAM DESIGN)

AR 301X. 3D MODELING II

This course will build upon the skills learned in AR/IMGD 2201 with studies in life drawing/anatomy study and application towards completed character models. Students create high resolution sculpts for real time game environments and animation. Topics covered include character design as it applies to 3D modeling, creating realistic design sculpts and incorporating them into a game environment as well as the study of anatomy as it applies to organic modeling. Recommended Background: AR/IMGD 2101, AR 2202 (Figure Drawing)

AR 312X. 3D MODELING II

AR 320X. THE ART OF ANIMATION II

This course builds upon the techniques learned in IMGD 2201/AR 2201 (The Art of Animation). Students animate a character and put it in an interactive game environment using existing models. Topics covered include animation principals such as timing, squash and stretch, animation pipelines and applying animation to a real time game setting. Recommended Background: IMGD 2005 and IMGD 2201/AR 2201

AR 1100. ESSENTIALS OF ART

Cat. I This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of two and three-dimensional visual organization. The course focuses on graphic expression, idea development, and visual literacy. Students will be expected to master basic rendering skills, perspective drawing, concept art, and storyboarding through traditional and/or computer-based tools.

AR 1101. DIGITAL IMAGING AND COMPUTER ART

Cat. I This course focuses on the methods, procedures and techniques of creating and manipulating images through electronic and digital means. Students will develop an understanding of image alteration. Topics may include color theory, displays, modeling, shading, and visual perception. Recommended background: AR 1100.

AR 1111. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

Cat. I How do we understand a work of art? Through readings and the study of objects at the Worcester Art Museum, the student will survey the major developments in world art and be introduced to various critical perspectives in art history. Students will learn how art historians work with primary materials and formulate arguments. No previous knowledge of art is required. (Formerly HU 1014.)

AR 2101. 3D MODELING I

Cat. I 3D modeling is concerned with how to render created forms in a virtual environment. This course covers 3D modeling applications in video game development, film production, product design and fine art. Topics may include creating and armature, modeling organic and hard surfaces and sculpting using traditional techniques applied to a 3D model. Students will create works suitable for presentation in professional quality portfolio. Recommended background: AR 1100 and AR 1101.

AR 2111. MODERN ART

Cat. I The successive phases of modern art, especially painting, are examined in light of the late-19th-century break with the 600-year old tradition of representation. Topics covered include: non-objective art and abstraction?theory and practice, primitivism in modern art, surrealism and the irrational, the impact of photography on modern painting, cubism and collage, regionalism and abstract expressionism as American art forms, Pop art and popular culture, and the problem of concept versus representation in art. (Formerly AR 2300.)

AR 2114. MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN THE AMERICAN ERA, 1750-2001 AND BEYOND

Cat. I This course studies, in a non-technical way, America?s buildings and places, in the context of world architecture in modern times. The history of American architecture was shaped by the forces that shaped America, from its political emergence in the eighteenth century to the post-9/11 era. These forces include dreams of social and spiritual perfection; a tight and conflicted relation with nature; and the rise and spread of industrial capitalism. The same forces created the Modern Movement in architecture. How are modernism and American architecture interrelated? Illustrated lectures, films, and tours of Worcester architecture explore the question, while training students in the methods of architectural history and criticism. Students who have taken AR 2113, Topics in 19th- and 20th-Century Architecture, since the 2000-2001 academic year MAY NOT take AR 2114 for credit.

AR 2201. THE ART OF ANIMATION I

Cat. I This course examines the fundamentals of computer generated 2D and 3D modeling and animation as they apply to creating believable characters and environments. Students will learn skeletal animation and traditional polygonal animation, giving weight and personality to characters through movement, environmental lighting, and changing mood and emotion. Students will be expected to master the tools of 3D modeling and skinning, and scripting of behaviors. Recommended background: AR 1101.

AR 2202. FIGURE DRAWING

The focus of this course is in study of representational figure drawing. This course will cover drawing techniques, applied to study from a live model. Topics covered will be sight size measurement, study of form and light, copying from master drawings and applying these lessons to weekly sessions with a live model. Each class will feature a demonstration on the topic followed by individual critique and study. Recommended Background: AR1100

AR 2700. DIGITAL PAINTING

This course covers painting techniques as applied to texturing a 3D asset or illustration/conceptual art. Topics include are color theory, study of form, lighting, applying traditional painting ideas to the digital format, character design, generation of ideas and a history of digital painting. Each class features a demonstration on the topic followed by individual critique and study. Students work towards a final project that may be suitable for an Art portfolio. Recommended Background: AR 1101 (Digital imaging and Computer Art); AR 2202 (Figure Drawing)

AR 3101. 3D MODELING II

This course will build upon the skills learned in 3D MODELING with studies in life drawing/anatomy study and application towards completed character models. Students will create high resolution sculpts for real time game environments and animation. Topics covered will be character design as it applies to 3D MODELING, creating realistic design sculpts and incorporating them into a game environment as well as the study of anatomy as it applies to organic modeling. Recommended Background: AR 1101, IMGD/AR 2101, AR 2202.

AR 3112. MODERNISM, MASS CULTURE, AND THE AVANT-GARDE

Cat. I What is the role of art to be in the modern world? Can art be a vehicle for social change, or should art be a self-critical discipline that pursues primarily aesthetic ends? What is the relationship between art and mass culture? Using primary sources, this course focuses on some of the theorists and artistic trends since the mid-nineteenth century that have sought to resolve this dilemma. These include: Ruskin, Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement; Art for Art?s Sake; the German Werkbund and the Bauhaus; American industrial design.

AR 3150. LIGHT, VISION AND UNDERSTANDING

By using material from the sciences and the humanities, this course examines the ways in which ideas of knowledge and of human nature have been fashioned. The specific topics include physical theories about light, biological and psychological theories of visual perception, and artistic theories and practices concerned with representation. The mixing of material from different academic disciplines is deliberate, and meant to counter the notion that human pursuits are ?naturally? arranged in the neat packages found in the modern university. The course draws upon the physical and social sciences, and the humanities, to examine how those fields relate to one another, and how they produce knowledge and self-knowledge. Cultural as well as disciplinary factors are assessed in this process. Light, Vision and Understanding is conducted as a seminar. The diverse collection of reading materials includes a number of primary texts in different fields. In addition, the students keep a journal in which they record the results of numerous individual observations and experiments concerning light and visual perception. The course can fit into several Humanities and Arts topic areas as well as serve as a starting point for an IQP. There are no specific requirements for this course, although some knowledge of college-level physics, as well an acquaintance with the visual arts, is helpful.

AR 3200. INTERACTIVE ELECTRONIC ARTS

This course introduces students to techniques and processes for the creation of real-time, interactive works of art. Students learn to use electronic sensors and other tools for audio, graphics, and video processing, as well as design customized software interfaces to create interactive artworks that respond to users and their environment. The course also introduces students to the work of significant contemporary arts practitioners as well as their historical precedents, with a special emphasis on inter-media works that bridge visual art, music composition, and the performing arts. Topics may include electronic musical instruments and performance interfaces, computer vision, VJing, electronically-augmented dance, controller hacking, wired clothing, networked collaboration and mobile media, and algorithmic and generative art. Recommended Background: Animation (AR/IMGD 2101 or equivalent), and exposure to digital audio or music and introductory programming.

AR 3201. ANIMATION II

This course will build upon the techniques learned in IMGD 2201/AR 2201. Students will learn advanced animation techniques applied to lip syncing, facial movement, emotion communication, and body language. Topics covered may include character rigging, biped and quadruped animation, and animation pipelines. Students will create animated scenes for narrative video and/or real time game environments. Recommended Background: AR/IMGD 2201, AR/IMGD 2202. Suggested additional background: IMGD 2005.

AR 3700. CONCEPT ART AND CREATIVE ILLUSTRATION

This course covers drawing as it applies to concept art and illustration. The course begins with study of a human model and representational drawing. Following this, students work on drawing from the mind and applying the lessons learned from the figure drawing to creating concept art and illustration. Topics covered are shape recognition and recalling, inventing from the mind, creative starters, study of form and light, visual composition and developing a personal approach, working with individual strengths to create a compelling visual design. Students create a series of concept art exercises and apply these skills towards a personal project of their own. Recommended Background: AR 2202 (Figure Drawing); IMGD/AR 2700 (Digital Painting)

 
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