Biomedical Engineering

The second digit for Biomedical Engineering course numbers is coded as follows:
0 — Bioinstrumentation, Biosignals, Introduction
1 — Physiology
2 — Bioelectric, Bioimaging
3 — Design
5 — Biomechanics, Biological Systems
6 — Biofluids
8 — Biomaterials
NOTE: Courses listed in previous catalogs with “BE” as the prefix and the same course number as below are considered to be the SAME COURSE.

BME 38XX. CELLULAR ENGINEERING LAB

This laboratory-driven course provides hands-on experience in the application of bioengineering to control cellular processes. Students will be challenged to design an intervention to manipulate a specific cellular process (adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation) and use modern cellular and molecular biology tools to assess and refine their approach. Laboratory exercises will provide an overview of cell culture technique, microscopy and molecular probes, quantification of cell proliferation and migration, and assessment of cellular differentiation in the context of the assigned projects. Students will complete the project at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively. Recommended background: Basic chemistry (CH 1010 and CH 1020) and a solid knowledge of cell biology (BB 2550).

BME 381X. BIOMATERIALS LAB

This laboratory-driven course provides hands-on experience in the design, fabrication and characterization of biomaterials for medical applications. Students will use synthetic and natural polymer materials to fabricate a scaffold for applications such as tissue engineering, wound healing or controlled drug delivery. A challenge-based laboratory project will be assigned which will require the students to design a biomaterial scaffold that meets specific design criteria, and quantitatively assess the properties of this scaffold to evaluate how well the criteria were met. Design criteria may include mechanical strength, biocompatibility, porosity, degradation rate, or release kinetics. Students will complete the project at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively. Recommended background: Basic chemistry (CH 1010 and CH 1020) and a solid knowledge of material science (ES 2001).

BME 430X. MQP CAPSTONE DESIGN

This course guides students through the engineering design process during the first two terms of their MQP to ensure that students participating in off-campus MQPs (with industrial or clinical clients) fulfill their capstone design requirement. The course focuses on developing a revised client statement based on the objectives, constraints, and functions of the design. Methods for concept generation, concept selection and development strategy and planning will be covered. In addition, ethics, manufacturability, and sustainability concerns will also be covered. Recommended background: BME3300 or equivalent. Course should be taken concurrently with the MQP.

BME 431X. INNOVATION IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN

This course provides students with design skills to apply to their MQP in BME. Creativity and innovation in design, federal biomedical regulations, understanding customer needs, testing and analyzing in BME design and communicating product designs. Students will apply classroom concepts to their MQPs. Recommended background: Principles of engineering design such as BME 3300 or equivalent. Course should be taken concurrently with the MQP.

BME 483X. DRUG DELIVERY

The course will provide knowledge about drug delivery systems as part of regenerative medicine strategies. The course will incorporate different biomaterial based drug delivery systems that have been recently developed as part of tissue engineering strategies. Course work will include reading recent journal publications, group projects and presentations. Recommended background: An intermediate background in biomaterials and tissue engineering (BME2811). Working knowledge of calculus (MA 1021).

BME 1001. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Cat. I Lectures, demonstrations, hands-on experimentation, and scientific literature readings in the major branches of biomedical engineering. A series of laboratory demonstration/experiments are utilized to complement key concepts covered in various lectures.

BME 2210. BIOMEDICAL SIGNALS, INSTRUMENTS AND MEASUREMENTS

Cat I. This course is an introduction to the instrumentation methods used to measure, store and analyze the signals produced by biomedical phenomena. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the basic design and implementation of techniques for measuring a broad scope of signal types for molecular, cellular and physiological research. Sensors used for acquiring electrical, magnetic, optical/spectral and chemical signals will be covered. Topics include the underlying physics and chemistry of biomedical signals, biosensor types and usage, amplification and signal conditioning, data acquisition methods, and sources of artifact and noise. Recommended background: PH 1120/21, CH 1010 or equivalent.

BME 2211. BIOMEDICAL DATA ANALYSIS

Cat I. To learn the fundamentals of basic signal processing methods as well as linear time series analyses framework for modeling and mining biological data. Tools of data analysis include statistics for determining significance of a result, Laplace and Z transforms, convolution, correlation, sampling theorem, Fourier transform, transfer function, coherence function and various filtering techniques. The goal of this course is to offer the students an opportunity to learn and model and simulate static and dynamic physiological systems using linear systems theory. First principles of chemistry and physics are used to quantitatively model physiological systems. Most of the models are based on linear systems theory. Simulations and estimation are performed using Matlab and already-developed software. Recommended background: BME 2210, CS 1101 or equivalent.

BME 2511. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS AND BIOTRANSPORT

Cat. I This course is an introduction to the analysis of physiological systems using principles of biomechanics including statics, stress analysis, and transport phenomena. Basic theories of static equilibrium, stress analysis, momentum transport, mass transport and energy transport are presented and applied to cellular and mammalian physiology. Principles of biomechanics transport phenomena are also applied to the design of medical devices and bioengineered tissues. Topics include forces, moments, free body diagrams, principal stresses, viscoelasticity, differential and integral balances, rheology of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, diffusion in reacting systems and homogeneous vs. heterogeneous reaction systems. Recommended background: MA 2501, PH 1120 or PH 1121. Students who have previously received credit for BME 2504 or BME 2604 may not receive credit for BME 2511.

BME 2811. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMATERIALS SCIENCE AND TISSUE ENGINEERING

Cat. I This course provides an introduction to the characterization, analysis and design of biomaterials for the purposes of correcting deformities, restoring lost function or promoting tissue regeneration in the human body. The principles of materials science, specifically the fundamental structure-function relationships of biomaterials will be explored, as they relate to the use of materials in the body. The course will also examine properties of biomaterials as they relate to minimizing corrosion, controlling degradation and tailoring cell-material interaction to guide cell growth and tissue regeneration. Topics include structural properties of materials, characterization of materials, tissue responses to implants and designing materials for tissue engineering. Recommended background: PH 1110, CH 1110, BB 2550, ES 2001 or equivalent.

BME 3011. BIOINSTRUMENTATN & BIOSENSORS

BME 3012. BIOMEDICAL SENSORS LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) This laboratory-based course is designed to develop hands-on experimental skills relevant to the selection and application of various sensors used to acquire biomedical signals. Recommended background: BME 2210, BME 2211, ECE 2010, ECE 2111 or equivalent. Students who have previously taken BME 3011 cannot receive credit for this course.

BME 3013. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) This laboratory-based course is designed to develop hands-on experimental skills relevant to the design and application of analog instrumentation commonly used to acquire biomedical signals. Recommended background: BME 2210, BME 2211, ECE 2010, ECE 2111 or equivalent. Students who have previously taken BME 3011 cannot receive credit for this course.

BME 3014. SIGNAL PROCESSING LABORATORY

This course is an introduction to the computational methods used to extract and analyze the signals produced by biomedical phenomena. The goal of this course is to familiarize the student with implementing the most common algorithmic approaches for data analysis used in biomedical engineering. Coursework will cover programming for topics such as peak detection, spectral analysis and the fast Fourier transform FFT method, auto-regression analysis, polynomial trend removal, and signal filtering methods. Recommended background: BME 2211, CS1101 or equivalent

BME 3111. PHYSIOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

Cat. I This course provides students with an understanding of mammalian physiology and the engineering aspects of different physiological systems. The course will have both a lecture and laboratory portion. The laboratory portion will provide the students with the ability to analyze and interpret data from living systems, which is a required ABET program criteria for student majoring in Biomedical Engineering. The course will focus on a number of organ systems that may include cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal. Engineering principles that include biomechanical, bioelectrical, and biofluids will be applied to physiological systems. Recommended background: A knowledge of biomechanics (BME 2504), biological transport (BME 2604) and bioelectric foundations (BME 2204).

BME 3300. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN

Cat. I Students are guided through the open-ended, real-world, design process starting with the project definition, specification development, management, team interactions and communication, failure and safety criteria, progress reporting, marketing concepts, documentation and technical presentation of the final project outcome. The course will include a significant writing component, will make use of computers, and hands-on design explorations. Students who have previously received credit for BME 2300 may not receive credit for BME 3300.

BME 3503. SKELETAL BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) This laboratory course will help students increase their knowledge of the mechanics of the musculoskeletal system. Students will gain understanding of the course materials and technical skills through the combined hands-on application of state-of-the-art biomechanical testing equipment and computer simulation modules towards solving authentic problems involving balance, strength, and movement. Recommended background: Statics (ES 2501) and dynamics (ES 2503).

BME 3504. EXPERIMENTAL BIOMECHANICS

BME 3505. SOLID BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY: TECHNIQUES

This laboratory-driven solid biomechanics course provides hands-on experience in characterizing the mechanical properties of biological tissues such as bone, tendons, ligaments, skin, and blood vessels and their synthetic analogs. Students gain an indepth understanding of the course material by performing uniaxial tension and compression, bending, and torsion tests on hard and soft tissues using industry-standard testing equipment and completing mechanical and statistical analysis of the data. Recommended background: A solid knowledge of mechanics of materials (ES2502), material science (ES 2001), and statistics (MA2610 or MA2611). Students who have previously received credit for BME3504 cannot receive credit for this course.

BME 3506. TISSUE BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

This laboratory-driven solid biomechanics course provides hands-on experience in characterizing the mechanical properties of biological tissues such as bone, tendons, ligaments, skin, and blood vessels and their synthetic analogs, in the context of an authentic challenge. Students gain an in-depth understanding of the course material from personal observations, measurements, and analysis of biological tissues and synthetic replacement/fixation materials using industry-standard testing equipment. A challenge-based laboratory project will be assigned which will require the students to determine and execute effective test methods at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively. Recommended background: Ability to independently perform tensile and bending tests using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine and to perform mechanical and statistical analysis of test data (BME3505). Students who have previously received credit for BME3504 cannot receive credit for this course.

BME 3605. BIOTRANSPORT LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) This laboratory-driven transport course provides hands-on experience in measuring heat, flow, and transport in biologically-relevant systems. Students gain an in-depth understanding of the course material from personal observations and measurements on model cardiovascular systems and connective tissues. Challenge-based laboratory projects will be assigned which will require the students to determine and execute effective test methods at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively. Systems modeled may include blood vessels, stenotic vessels, and aneurysms. Connective tissues tested may include blood vessels and skin. Recommended background: Heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and transport (BME 2511 and ES 3002, ES 3003, or ES 3004 or equivalent).

BME 3811. BIOMATERIALS LAB

This laboratory-driven course provides hands-on experience in the design, fabrication and characterization of biomaterials for medical applications. Students will use synthetic and natural polymer materials to fabricate a scaffold for applications such as tissue engineering, wound healing or controlled drug delivery. A challenge-based laboratory project will be assigned which will require the students to design a biomaterial scaffold that meets specific design criteria, and quantitatively assess the properties of this scaffold to evaluate how well the criteria were met. Design criteria may include mechanical strength, biocompatibility, porosity, degradation rate, or release kinetics. Students will complete the project at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively. Recommended background: Basic chemistry (CH 1010 and CH 1020) and a knowledge of material science (ES 2001) or equivalent.

BME 3813. CELLULAR ENGINEERING LAB

This laboratory-driven course provides hands-on experience in the application of bioengineering to control cellular processes. Students will be challenged to design an intervention to manipulate a specific cellular process (adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation) and use modern cellular and molecular biology tools to assess and refine their approach. Laboratory exercises will provide an overview of cell culture technique, microscopy and molecular probes, quantification of cell proliferation and migration, and assessment of cellular differentiation in the context of the assigned projects. Students will complete the project at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively. Recommended background: Basic chemistry (CH 1010 and CH 1020) and a solid knowledge of cell biology (BB 2550) or equivalent.

BME 4011. BIOMEDICAL SIGNAL ANAYLSIS

Introduction to biomedical signal processing and analysis. Fundamental techniques to analyze and process signals that originate from biological sources: ECGs, EMGs, EEGs, blood pressure signals, etc. Course integrates physiological knowledge with the information useful for physiologic investigation and medical diagnosis and processing. Biomedical signal characterization, time domain analysis techniques (transfer functions, convolution, auto- and cross-correlation), frequency domain (Fourier analysis), continuous and discrete signals, deterministic and stochastic signal analysis methods. Analog and digital filtering. Recommended background: ECE 2311, ECE 2312, BME 3011 or equivalent.

BME 4023. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION DESIGN

This course builds on the fundamental knowledge of instrumentation and sensors. Lectures cover the principles of designing, building and testing analog instruments to measure and process biomedical signals. The course is intended for students interested in the design and development of electronic bioinstrumentation. Emphasis is placed on developing the student?s ability to design a simple medical device to perform real-time physiological measurements. Recommended background: BME 3012, BME 3013, ECE 2010 and ECE 2019.

BME 4201. BIOMEDICAL IMAGING

This course is a practical introduction to biomedical image processing using examples from various branches of medical imaging. Topics include: point operations, filtering in the image and Fourier domains, image reconstruction in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and data analysis using image segmentation. Review of linear-systems theory and the relevant principles of physics. Course work uses examples from microscopy, computed tomography, X-ray radiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A working knowledge of undergraduate signal analysis, and linear algebra is desirable. Facility with a high-level programming language is recommended.

BME 4300. MQP CAPSTONE DESIGN

Cat. I (1/6 unit) This course guides students through the engineering design process during the first term of their MQP to aid them in fulfilling their capstone design requirement. The course focuses on developing a revised client statement based on the objectives, constraints, and functions of the design. Methods for concept generation, concept selection and development strategy will be covered. In addition, project planning tools, business plans, ethics, and design for manufacturability and sustainability will be covered. Recommended background: Principles of engineering design such as BME 3300 or equivalent. Course should be taken concurrently with the MQP. Students who have taken BME 430X cannot get credit for BME 4300. BME 4300 cannot be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

BME 4504. BIOMECHANICS

This course emphasizes the applications of mechanics to describe the material properties of living tissues. It is concerned with the description and measurements of these properties as related to their physiological functions. Emphasis on the interrelationship between biomechanics and physiology in medicine, surgery, body injury and prostheses. Topics covered include: review of basic mechanics, stress, strain, constitutive equations and the field equations, viscoelastic behavior, and models of material behavior. The measurement and characterization of properties of tendons, skin, muscles and bone. Biomechanics as related to body injury and the design of prosthetic devices. Recommended background: mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503, ME 3501), mathematics (MA 2051).

BME 4606. BIOFLUDIS

This course emphasizes the applications of fluid mechanics to biological problems. The course concentrates primarily on the human circulatory and respiratory systems. Topics covered include: blood flow in the heart, arteries, veins and microcirculation and air flow in the lungs and airways. Mass transfer across the walls of these systems is also presented. Recommended background: continuum mechanics (ME 3501), fluids (ES 3004).

BME 4701. CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOENGINEERING

Cat. I This course examines the principles of molecular and cell biology applied to the design of engineered molecules, cells and tissues. Topics will include the basic structural, chemical and physical properties of biomolecules (proteins, lipids, DNA and RNA), application of biomolecules to monitor and alter cellular processes in vitro and in vivo, and design considerations for engineering cell and molecular therapeutics. Case studies will be used to examine specific applications of molecular and cellular bioengineering technologies to treat disease and promote tissue repair and regeneration. Recommended background: Cell biology (BB 2550). Additional coursework in molecular biology (BB 2950) and/or genetics (BB 2920) would be beneficial. Students who earned credit for BME 37XX cannot receive credit for BME 4701.

BME 4814. BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS

This course discusses various aspects pertaining to the selection, processing, testing (in vitro and in vivo) and performance of biomedical materials. The biocompatibility and surgical applicability of metallic, polymeric and ceramic implants and prosthetic devices are discussed. The physico-chemical interactions between the implant material and the physiological environment will be described. The use of biomaterials in maxillofacial, orthopedic, dental, ophthalmic and neuromuscular applications is presented. (Recommended background: BB 3101 or equivalent introduction to human anatomy, ES 2001 or equivalent introduction to materials science and engineering.)

BME 4828. BIOMATERIAL - TISSUE INTERACTIONS

This course examines the principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical devices, artificial organs, and scaffolds for tissue engineering. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of cellular processes such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Principles of wound healing and tissue remodeling are used to study biological responses to implanted materials and devices. Case studies will be analyzed to compare tissue responses to intact, bioresorbable and bioerodible biomaterials. Additionally, this course will examine criteria for restoring physiological function of tissue and organs, and investigate strategies to design implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterial-tissue interactions. (Prerequisites: BME 2604, BB 2550 or equivalent, ES 2001 or equivalent, PH 1120 or PH 1121.)

 
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