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Biomedical Engineering

The second digit for Biomedical Engineering course numbers is coded as follows:

0 - Bioinstrumentation, Biosignals, Introduction
1 - Physiology
2 - Bioelectric, Bioimaging
3 - Design
5 - Biomechanics, Biological Systems
6 - Biofluids
8 - Biomaterials

NOTE: Courses listed in previous catalogs with "BE" as the prefix and the same course number as below are considered to be the SAME COURSE.

BME 1001. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING.


Cat. I
Lectures, demonstrations, hands-on experimentation, and scientific literature readings in the major branches of biomedical engineering. A series of laboratory demonstration/experiments are utilized to complement key concepts covered in various lectures.

BME/ECE 2204. BIOELECTRIC FOUNDATIONS .


Cat. I
An introduction to the origins and characteristics of the electric and electromagnetic signals that arise in biological tissues. Topics include the behavior of excitable cells and tissues, the intrinsic electrical and magnetic properties of biological tissues, and the response of excitable cells to electric and magnetic field stimulation. Laboratory projects include the measurement of bioelectric signals (EMG, EKG, EEG, EOG, and evoked response) and the fundamentals of data acquisition, analysis, and statistics. The principles of writing and maintaining a laboratory notebook are also developed and used.

Recommended background: BB 2550 or equivalent, PH 1120 or PH 1121.

Students who have received credit for BME 4101 may not receive credit for BME 2204.

BME 2504. FOUNDATIONS IN BIOMECHANICS.


Cat. I
This course is an introduction to the analysis of the musculoskeletal systems using principles of engineering mechanics. Basic principles of mechanics, stress, strain and deformation in beams are presented and used to characterize the material properties of tissues such as skin, tendon, ligament, bone and cartilage. Principles of biomechanics are also applied to the design of medical devices and bioengineered tissues. Topics include forces, moments of forces, free body diagrams, principal stresses, transverse shear stresses and beam loading.

Recommended background: MA 2051, PH 1110 or PH 1111.

Students who have previously received credit for BME 4504 may not receive credit for BME 2504.

BME 2604. FOUNDATIONS IN BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT PHENOMENA.


Cat. I
This course is an introduction to the analysis of complex biological systems using principles of transport phenomena. Basic theories of momentum transport, mass transport and energy transport are presented and applied to cellular and mammalian physiology. Principles of transport phenomena are also applied to the design of medical devices and bioengineered tissues. Topics include differential and integral balances, rheology of Newtonian and non- Newtonian fluids, diffusion in reacting systems and homogeneous vs. heterogeneous reaction systems.

Recommended background: MA 2051, PH 1110 or PH 1111.

Students who have received credit for BME 3101 may not receive credit for BME 2604.

BME/ECE 3011. BIOINSTRUMENTATION AND BIOSENSORS.


Cat. I
A study of the basic principles of biomedical electronics and measurement with emphasis on the operational performance and selection of transducers, instruments and systems for biomedical data acquisition and processing. Biopotential electrodes. Analysis and selection of physical, optical, electrical, mechanical, thermal transduction mechanisms which form the basis of the sensor design. Clinical laboratory instrumentation. Electrical safety problems in the clinical environment.

Recommended background: MA 2051, ECE 3601, or equivalent.

BME 3111. PHYSIOLOGY AND ENGINEERING.


Cat. I
This course provides students with an understanding of mammalian physiology and the engineering aspects of different physiological systems. The course will have both a lecture and laboratory portion. The laboratory portion will provide the students with the ability to analyze and interpret data from living systems, which is a required ABET program criteria for student majoring in Biomedical Engineering. The course will focus on a number of organ systems that may include cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal. Engineering principles that include biomechanical, bioelectrical, and biofluids will be applied to physiological systems.

Recommended background: A knowledge of biomechanics (BME 2504), biological transport (BME 2604) and bioelectric foundations (BME 2204).

BME 3300. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN.


Cat. I
Students are guided through the open-ended, real-world, design process starting with the project definition, specification development, management, team interactions and communication, failure and safety criteria, progress reporting, marketing concepts, documentation and technical presentation of the final project outcome. The course will include a significant writing component, will make use of computers, and hands-on design explorations.

Students who have previously received credit for BME 2300 may not receive credit for BME 3300.

BME 3504. EXPERIMENTAL BIOMECHANICS.


Cat. I
This laboratory-driven biomechanics course provides hands-on experience in characterizing the mechanical properties of hard and soft biological tissues. Students gain an in-depth understanding of the course material from personal observations and measurements on actual soft and hard tissues using industry standard testing equipment. Challenge-based laboratory projects will be assigned which will require the students to determine and execute effective test methods in teams at their own pace. Tissues tested may include blood vessels, cartilage, bone, tendons, skin, and muscle.

Recommended background: A solid knowledge of mechanics of materials (BE 2504 or ES 2502), and material science (ES 2001).

BME/ECE 4011. BIOMEDICAL SIGNAL ANALYSIS.


Cat. II
Introduction to biomedical signal processing and analysis. Fundamental techniques to analyze and process signals that originate from biological sources: ECGs, EMGs, EEGs, blood pressure signals, etc. Course integrates physiological knowledge with the information useful for physiologic investigation and medical diagnosis and processing. Biomedical signal characterization, time domain analysis techniques (transfer functions, convolution, auto- and cross-correlation), frequency domain (Fourier analysis), continuous and discrete signals, deterministic and stochastic signal analysis methods. Analog and digital filtering.

Recommended background: ECE 2311, ECE 2312, BME 3011, or equivalent.

This course will be offered in 2010-11, and in alternating years thereafter.

BME 4023. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION DESIGN.


Cat. II
This course builds on the fundamental knowledge of bioinstrumentation and biosensors presented in BME 3011. Lectures and hands-on laboratory experiments cover the principles of designing, building and testing analog instruments to measure biological events. Design laboratories will include biopotential amplifiers and biosensor/bioinstrumentation systems for the measurement of physiological parameters.

Recommended background: BME 2204, BME 3011, ECE 2011, and ECE 2111.

This course will be offered in 2010-11, and in alternating years thereafter.

BME 4201. BIOMEDICAL IMAGING.


Cat. II
This course is a practical introduction to biomedical image processing using examples from various branches of medical imaging. Topics include: point operations, filtering in the image and Fourier domains, image reconstruction in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and data analysis using image segmentation. Review of linear-systems theory and the relevant principles of physics. Course work uses examples from microscopy, computed tomography, X-ray radiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A working knowledge of undergraduate signal analysis and linear algebra is desirable. Facility with a high level programming language is recommended.

The course will be offered in 2010-11, and in alternating years thereafter.

BME/ME 4504. BIOMECHANICS.


Cat. II
This course emphasizes the applications of mechanics to describe the material properties of living tissues. It is concerned with the description and measurements of these properties as related to their physiological functions. Emphasis on the interrelationship between biomechanics and physiology in medicine, surgery, body injury and prostheses.

Topics covered include: Review of basic mechanics, stress, strain, constitutive equations and the field equations, viscoelastic behavior, and models of material behavior. The measurement and characterization of properties of tendons, skin, muscles and bone. Biomechanics as related to body injury and the design of prosthetic devices.

Recommended background: Mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503, ME 3501), Mathematics (MA 2051).

This course will be offered in 2011-12, and in alternating years thereafter.

BME/ME 4606. BIOFLUIDS.


Cat. II
This course emphasizes the applications of fluid mechanics to biological problems. The course concentrates primarily on the human circulatory and respiratory systems. Topics covered include: blood flow in the heart, arteries, veins and microcirculation and air flow in the lungs and airways. Mass transfer across the walls of these systems is also presented.

Recommended background: ME 3501 and fluid mechanics equivalent to ES 3004.

This course will be offered in 2010-11, and in alternating years thereafter.

BME/ME 4814. BIOMATERIALS.


Cat. I
A course discusses various aspects pertaining to the selection, processing, testing (in vitro and in vivo) and performance of biomedical materials. The biocompatibility and surgical applicability of metallic, polymeric and ceramic implants and prosthetic devices are discussed. The physico-chemical interactions between the implant material and the physiological environment will be described. The use of biomaterials in maxillifacial, orthopedic, dental, ophthalmic and neuromuscular applications is presented.

Recommended background: BB 3130 or equivalent introduction to Human Anatomy, ES 2001 or equivalent introduction to Materials Science and Engineering.

BME 4828. BIOMATERIALS - TISSUE INTERACTIONS .


Cat. I
This course examines the principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical devices, artificial organs and scaffolds for tissue engineering. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of cellular processes such as matrix synthesis, degradation and contraction. Principles of wound healing and tissue remodeling are used to study biological responses to implanted materials and devices. Case studies will be analyzed to compare tissue responses to intact, bioresorbable and bioerodible biomaterials. Additionally, this course will examine criteria for restoring physiological function of tissue and organs and investigate strategies to design implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterial-tissue interactions.

Recommended background: BB 2550 or equivalent, ES 2001 or equivalent, PH 1110 or PH 1111.

Graduate Biomedical Engineering Courses of Interest to Undergraduates

BME 523. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION.


Origins and characteristics of bioelectric signals, recording electrodes, amplifiers, chemical pressure and flow transducers, noninvasive monitoring techniques, and electrical safety. (Prerequisite: Circuits and electronics, control engineering or equivalent.)

BME 531. BIOMATERIALS IN THE DESIGN OF MEDICAL DEVICES.


Biomaterials are an integral part of medical devices, implants, controlled drug delivery systems, and tissue engineered constructs. Extensive research efforts have been expended on understanding how biologic systems interact with biomaterials. Meanwhile, controversy has revolved around biomaterials and their availability as a result of the backlash to the huge liability resulting from controversies related to material and processing shortcomings of medical devices. This course specifically addresses the unique role of biomaterials in medical device design and the use of emerging biomaterials technology in medical devices. The need to understand design requirements of medical devices based on safety and efficacy will be addressed. Unexpected device failure can occur if testing fails to account for synergistic interactions from chronic loading, aqueous environments, and biologic interactions. Testing methodologies are readily available to assess accelerated effects of loading in physiologic-like environments. This combined with subchronic effects of animal implants is a potential tool in assessing durability. It is difficult to predict the chronic effects of the total biologic environment. The ultimate determination of safety comes not only from following the details of regulations, but with an understanding of potential failure modes and designs that lowers the risk of these failures. This course will evaluate biomaterials and their properties as related to the design and reliability of medical devices.

BME 532. MEDICAL DEVICE REGULATION.


This course provides an overview of regulations that guide the Medical Devices industry. Primary focus is on the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and its associated regulations. The course covers the FD&C Act, including definitions, prohibited acts, penalties and general authority. The course also covers regulations, including establishment registration, premarket approval (PMA), and current good manufacturing practices. Requirements of other federal agencies (NRC, FCC, EPA) will also be discussed.

BME/ME 550. TISSUE ENGINEERING.


This biomaterials course focuses on the selection, processing, testing and performance of materials used in biomedical applications with special emphasis upon tissue engineering. Topics include: material selection and processing, mechanisms and kinetics of material degradation, cell-material interactions and interfaces; effect of construct architecture on tissue growth; and transport through engineered tissues. Examples of engineering tissues for replacing cartilage, bone, tendons, ligaments, skin and liver will be presented. (Recommended preparation: A first course in biomaterials equivalent to BME/ME 4814 and a basic understanding of physiology and cell biology.)

BME/ME 552. TISSUE MECHANICS.


This biomechanical course focuses on advanced techniques for the characterization of the structure and function of hard and soft tissues and their relationship to physiologic processes. Applications include: tissue injury, wound healing, the effect of pathological conditions upon tissue properties and design of medical devices and prostheses. (Recommended preparation: A first course in biomechanics equivalent to BME/ME 4504.)

BME/ME 554. COMPOSITES WITH BIOMEDICAL AND MATERIALS


Introduction to fiber/particulate reinforced, engineered and biologic materials. This course focuses on the elastic description and application of materials that are made up of a combination of submaterials, i.e., composites. Emphasis will be placed on the development of constitutive equations that define the mechanical behavior of a number of applications, including: biomaterial, tissue, and materials science. (Prerequisites: understanding of stress analysis and basic continuum mechanics.)

BME/ME 558. BIOFLUIDS AND BIOTRANSPORT.


The emphasis of this course is on modeling fluid flow within the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and the transport processes that take place in these systems. Applications include artificial heart valves, atherosclerosis, arterial impedance matching, clinical diagnosis, respiration, aerosol and particle deposition. Depending upon class interest, additional topics may include: reproductive fluids, animal propulsion in air and water and viscoelastic testing. (Recommended preparation: A first course in biofluids equivalent to BME/ME 4606.)

BME 560. PHYSIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS.


An introduction to fundamental principles in cell biology and physiology designed to provide the necessary background for advanced work in biomedical engineering. Quantitative methods of engineering and the physical sciences are stressed. Topics include cell biology and the physiology of major organ systems.

NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a life science requirement in the biomedical engineering graduate program. It cannot be used to satisfy a biomedical engineering course requirement.

BME 562. LABORATORY ANIMAL SURGERY.


A study of anesthesia, surgical techniques, and postoperative care in small laboratory animals. Anatomy and physiology of species used included as needed. Class limited to 15 students. Approximately 15 surgical exercises are performed by each student.

NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a life science requirement in the biomedical engineering graduate program. It cannot be used to satisfy a biomedical engineering course requirement.

BME 581. MEDICAL IMAGING SYSTEMS.


Overview of the physics of medical image analysis. Topics covered include X-Ray tubes, fluoroscopic screens, image intensifiers; nuclear medicine; ultrasound; computer tomography; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Image quality of each modality is described mathematically, using linear systems theory (Fourier transforms, convolutions). (Prerequisite: Signal analysis course ECE 2312 or equivalent.)

BME 582. PRINCIPLES OF IN VIVO NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE


This course emphasizes the applications of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FTNMR) imaging and spectroscopy in medicine and biology. Course topics include: review of the basic physical concepts of NMR (including the Bloch equations), theoretical and experimental aspects of FTNMR, theory of relaxation and relaxation mechanisms in FTNMR, instrumentation for FTNMR, NMR imaging techniques (point, line, plane, and volume methods), and in vivo NMR spectroscopy (including volume localization techniques). (Prerequisites: Differential and integral calculus, ordinary differential equations; organic chemistry recommended.)

BME 595. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING.


Topics in Biomedical Engineering. Presentations and discussions of the current literature in one or more of the following areas: medical imaging, neurosensory systems, bio-statics.

 
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