Humanities & Arts

AB 100X. BEGINNING ARABIC I

An intensive course to introduce the Arabic language to students with no background in Arabic. Emphasis will be on characters, grammar, and vocabulary. Oral language acquisition will stress structures and vocabulary required for basic communicative tasks. Cultural aspects of Arabic-speaking countries introduced through course material. First in a sequence of three. This class is not open to native or heritage speakers.

AB 110X. BEGINNING ARABIC II

Continuation of AB 100X, for non-native, non-heritage speakers. Second in a sequence of three. Recommended background: AB 100X.

AB 120X. BEGINNING ARABIC III

Continuation of AB 110X. Third in a sequence of three. Recommended background: AB 110X. Not open to native or heritage speakers.

AB 200X. THE CULTURE OF ARABIC-SPEAKING COUNTRIES

A course in the history and/or culture of Arabic-speaking countries. Taught in English, this course may be taken by students with no knowledge of Arabic, although students with prior language experience will find opportunities to continue their language learning. Open to heritage speakers of Arabic.

AB 1531. ELEMENTARY ARABIC I

An intensive course to introduce the Arabic language to students with no background in Arabic. Oral language acquisition will stress structures and vocabulary required for basic communicative tasks. Emphasis will be on grammar, vocabulary, and writing system. Cultural aspects of Arabic-speaking countries introduced through course material. This course is closed to native speakers of Arabic and heritage speakers except with written permission from the instructor.

AB 1532. ELEMENTARY ARABIC II

Continuation of AB 1531. Oral language acquisition will stress structures and vocabulary required for basic communicative tasks. Emphasis will be on grammar, vocabulary, and writing system. Cultural aspects of Arabic-speaking countries introduced through course material. This course is closed to native speakers of Arabic and heritage speakers except with written permission from the instructor. Recommended background: AB 1531.

AB 1533. ELEMENTARY ARABIC III

Continuation of AB 1532. Oral language acquisition will stress structures and vocabulary required for basic communicative tasks. Emphasis will be on grammar, vocabulary, and writing system. Cultural aspects of Arabic-speaking countries introduced through course material. This course is closed to native speakers of Arabic and heritage speakers except with written permission from the instructor. Recommended background: AB 1532.

AB 2542. THE CULTURE OF ARABIC-SPEAKING COUNTRIES

A course in the history and/or culture of Arabic-speaking countries. Taught in English, this course may be taken by students with beginning to heritage knowledge of Arabic, as well as students with no knowledge of the language. Arabic language students will find opportunities to continue their language learning.

AR 120X. VIDEO PRODUCTION

This course will introduce students to concepts and techniques for live action digital filmmaking. Topics will include constructing a visual narrative, principles of cinematography, visual and audio editing, working with actors, and the stylistic elements of various genres of filmmaking. Note: students interested in this course are advised to consider Film Studies (HU 225X), which provides a complementary theoretical approach to the language of film. The courses may be taken in either order.

AR 130X. GRAPHIC DESIGN

This course introduces design principles and their application to create effective forms of graphic communication. The students will learn the fundamentals of visual communication and will work on projects to analyze, organize, and solve design problems. Topics may include: the design process; figure/ground; shape; dynamic balance; Gestalt principles; typography; layout and composition; color; production and presentation in digital formats.

AR 300X. INTER-MEDIA ELECTRONIC ARTS

This course will introduce students to techniques and processes for the creation of real-time, interactive works of art. Students will learn to use electronic sensors and other tools for audio and video processing, as well as designing customized software interfaces to create interactive artworks that respond to users and their environment. The course will introduce students to the work of significant contemporary arts practitioners as well as their historical precedents, with a special emphasis on inter-media works that bridge visual art, music composition, and the performing arts. Topics may include electronic musical instruments and performance interfaces, VJing, electronically-augmented dance, controller hacking, wired clothing, networked collaboration and mobile media, and algorithmic and generative art. Recommended Background: AR 1101 (DIGITAL IMAGING AND COMPUTER ART), video production (IMGD 2005 MACHINIMA: FILM MAKING IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS), digital audio/music (MU 3611 COMPUTER TECHNIQUES IN MUSIC, MU 3612 COMPUTERS AND SYNTHESIZERS IN MUSIC, MU 3613 DIGITAL SOUND DESIGN, IMGD 203x INTRO TO GAME AUDIO), an introductory programming course (CS 1101 INTRO TO PROGRAM DESIGN, CS 1102 ACCELERATED INTRO TO PROGRAM DESIGN)

AR 301X. 3D MODELING II

This course will build upon the skills learned in AR/IMGD 2201 with studies in life drawing/anatomy study and application towards completed character models. Students create high resolution sculpts for real time game environments and animation. Topics covered include character design as it applies to 3D modeling, creating realistic design sculpts and incorporating them into a game environment as well as the study of anatomy as it applies to organic modeling. Recommended Background: AR/IMGD 2101, AR 2202 (Figure Drawing)

AR 312X. 3D MODELING II

AR 320X. THE ART OF ANIMATION II

This course builds upon the techniques learned in IMGD 2201/AR 2201 (The Art of Animation). Students animate a character and put it in an interactive game environment using existing models. Topics covered include animation principals such as timing, squash and stretch, animation pipelines and applying animation to a real time game setting. Recommended Background: IMGD 2005 and IMGD 2201/AR 2201

AR 1100. ESSENTIALS OF ART

Cat. I This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of two and three-dimensional visual organization. The course focuses on graphic expression, idea development, and visual literacy. Students will be expected to master basic rendering skills, perspective drawing, concept art, and storyboarding through traditional and/or computer-based tools.

AR 1101. DIGITAL IMAGING AND COMPUTER ART

Cat. I This course focuses on the methods, procedures and techniques of creating and manipulating images through electronic and digital means. Students will develop an understanding of image alteration. Topics may include color theory, displays, modeling, shading, and visual perception. Recommended background: AR 1100.

AR 1111. INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

Cat. I How do we understand a work of art? Through readings and the study of objects at the Worcester Art Museum, the student will survey the major developments in world art and be introduced to various critical perspectives in art history. Students will learn how art historians work with primary materials and formulate arguments. No previous knowledge of art is required. (Formerly HU 1014.)

AR 2101. 3D MODELING I

Cat. I 3D modeling is concerned with how to render created forms in a virtual environment. This course covers 3D modeling applications in video game development, film production, product design and fine art. Topics may include creating and armature, modeling organic and hard surfaces and sculpting using traditional techniques applied to a 3D model. Students will create works suitable for presentation in professional quality portfolio. Recommended background: AR 1100 and AR 1101.

AR 2111. MODERN ART

Cat. I The successive phases of modern art, especially painting, are examined in light of the late-19th-century break with the 600-year old tradition of representation. Topics covered include: non-objective art and abstraction?theory and practice, primitivism in modern art, surrealism and the irrational, the impact of photography on modern painting, cubism and collage, regionalism and abstract expressionism as American art forms, Pop art and popular culture, and the problem of concept versus representation in art. (Formerly AR 2300.)

AR 2114. MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN THE AMERICAN ERA, 1750-2001 AND BEYOND

Cat. I This course studies, in a non-technical way, America?s buildings and places, in the context of world architecture in modern times. The history of American architecture was shaped by the forces that shaped America, from its political emergence in the eighteenth century to the post-9/11 era. These forces include dreams of social and spiritual perfection; a tight and conflicted relation with nature; and the rise and spread of industrial capitalism. The same forces created the Modern Movement in architecture. How are modernism and American architecture interrelated? Illustrated lectures, films, and tours of Worcester architecture explore the question, while training students in the methods of architectural history and criticism. Students who have taken AR 2113, Topics in 19th- and 20th-Century Architecture, since the 2000-2001 academic year MAY NOT take AR 2114 for credit.

AR 2201. THE ART OF ANIMATION I

Cat. I This course examines the fundamentals of computer generated 2D and 3D modeling and animation as they apply to creating believable characters and environments. Students will learn skeletal animation and traditional polygonal animation, giving weight and personality to characters through movement, environmental lighting, and changing mood and emotion. Students will be expected to master the tools of 3D modeling and skinning, and scripting of behaviors. Recommended background: AR 1101.

AR 2202. FIGURE DRAWING

The focus of this course is in study of representational figure drawing. This course will cover drawing techniques, applied to study from a live model. Topics covered will be sight size measurement, study of form and light, copying from master drawings and applying these lessons to weekly sessions with a live model. Each class will feature a demonstration on the topic followed by individual critique and study. Recommended Background: AR1100

AR 2700. DIGITAL PAINTING

This course covers painting techniques as applied to texturing a 3D asset or illustration/conceptual art. Topics include are color theory, study of form, lighting, applying traditional painting ideas to the digital format, character design, generation of ideas and a history of digital painting. Each class features a demonstration on the topic followed by individual critique and study. Students work towards a final project that may be suitable for an Art portfolio. Recommended Background: AR 1101 (Digital imaging and Computer Art); AR 2202 (Figure Drawing)

AR 3101. 3D MODELING II

This course will build upon the skills learned in 3D MODELING with studies in life drawing/anatomy study and application towards completed character models. Students will create high resolution sculpts for real time game environments and animation. Topics covered will be character design as it applies to 3D MODELING, creating realistic design sculpts and incorporating them into a game environment as well as the study of anatomy as it applies to organic modeling. Recommended Background: AR 1101, IMGD/AR 2101, AR 2202.

AR 3112. MODERNISM, MASS CULTURE, AND THE AVANT-GARDE

Cat. I What is the role of art to be in the modern world? Can art be a vehicle for social change, or should art be a self-critical discipline that pursues primarily aesthetic ends? What is the relationship between art and mass culture? Using primary sources, this course focuses on some of the theorists and artistic trends since the mid-nineteenth century that have sought to resolve this dilemma. These include: Ruskin, Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement; Art for Art?s Sake; the German Werkbund and the Bauhaus; American industrial design.

AR 3150. LIGHT, VISION AND UNDERSTANDING

By using material from the sciences and the humanities, this course examines the ways in which ideas of knowledge and of human nature have been fashioned. The specific topics include physical theories about light, biological and psychological theories of visual perception, and artistic theories and practices concerned with representation. The mixing of material from different academic disciplines is deliberate, and meant to counter the notion that human pursuits are ?naturally? arranged in the neat packages found in the modern university. The course draws upon the physical and social sciences, and the humanities, to examine how those fields relate to one another, and how they produce knowledge and self-knowledge. Cultural as well as disciplinary factors are assessed in this process. Light, Vision and Understanding is conducted as a seminar. The diverse collection of reading materials includes a number of primary texts in different fields. In addition, the students keep a journal in which they record the results of numerous individual observations and experiments concerning light and visual perception. The course can fit into several Humanities and Arts topic areas as well as serve as a starting point for an IQP. There are no specific requirements for this course, although some knowledge of college-level physics, as well an acquaintance with the visual arts, is helpful.

AR 3200. INTERACTIVE ELECTRONIC ARTS

This course introduces students to techniques and processes for the creation of real-time, interactive works of art. Students learn to use electronic sensors and other tools for audio, graphics, and video processing, as well as design customized software interfaces to create interactive artworks that respond to users and their environment. The course also introduces students to the work of significant contemporary arts practitioners as well as their historical precedents, with a special emphasis on inter-media works that bridge visual art, music composition, and the performing arts. Topics may include electronic musical instruments and performance interfaces, computer vision, VJing, electronically-augmented dance, controller hacking, wired clothing, networked collaboration and mobile media, and algorithmic and generative art. Recommended Background: Animation (AR/IMGD 2101 or equivalent), and exposure to digital audio or music and introductory programming.

AR 3201. ANIMATION II

This course will build upon the techniques learned in IMGD 2201/AR 2201. Students will learn advanced animation techniques applied to lip syncing, facial movement, emotion communication, and body language. Topics covered may include character rigging, biped and quadruped animation, and animation pipelines. Students will create animated scenes for narrative video and/or real time game environments. Recommended Background: AR/IMGD 2201, AR/IMGD 2202. Suggested additional background: IMGD 2005.

AR 3700. CONCEPT ART AND CREATIVE ILLUSTRATION

This course covers drawing as it applies to concept art and illustration. The course begins with study of a human model and representational drawing. Following this, students work on drawing from the mind and applying the lessons learned from the figure drawing to creating concept art and illustration. Topics covered are shape recognition and recalling, inventing from the mind, creative starters, study of form and light, visual composition and developing a personal approach, working with individual strengths to create a compelling visual design. Students create a series of concept art exercises and apply these skills towards a personal project of their own. Recommended Background: AR 2202 (Figure Drawing); IMGD/AR 2700 (Digital Painting)

CN 100X. BEGINNING CHINESE I

An intensive course to introduce the Chinese language (Mandarin) to students with no background in Chinese. Emphasis will be on phonetics (using pinyin romanization), tones, grammar, and vocabulary. Oral language acquisition will stress structures and vocabulary required for basic communicative tasks. Cultural aspects of China introduced through course material. First in a sequence of four. This class is not open to native or heritage speakers.

CN 110X. BEGINNING CHINESE II

Continuation of CHIN 100X, for non-native, non-heritage speakers. Chinese writing system will be introduced. Second in a sequence of four. Recommended background: CN 100X.

CN 120X. BEGINNING CHINESE III

Continuation of CN 110X. Third in a sequence of four. Recommended background: CN 110X. Not open to native or heritage speakers.

CN 200X. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE

Course will develop oral fluency, increase character recognition, improve reading and writing, and cultivate a more complex socio-cultural understanding of China. Fourth in a sequence of four. Recommended background: CN 120X. Not open to native or heritage speakers.

CN 220X. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE II

This course will build on intermediate Chinese conversational patterns. Class time will focus on dialogue and mastery of grammatical constructions. Character recognition and reading ability will supplement classroom activities. Conversational drills, audio recordings, video, and group interaction will enhance classroom learning. Not open to native or heritage speakers without written permission of instructor. Recommended background: CN 2541 Intermediate Chinese I

CN 230X. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE III

This course builds on students? intermediate Chinese conversational skills with emphasis on oral and written expression, with increased focus on character recognition and reading ability. Conversational drills, audio recordings, video, and group interaction will enhance classroom learning. Not open to native or heritage speakers without written permission of instructor. Recommended background: CN 220X Intermediate Chinese II

CN 240X. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE IV

This course continues to build on students? intermediate Chinese conversational skills. While dialogue and oral communication remain the main emphases, character recognition and written communication also become more central. Conversational drills, audio recordings, video, and group interaction will enhance classroom learning. Not open to native or heritage speakers without written permission of instructor. Recommended background: CN 230X Intermediate Chinese III

CN 300X. ADVANCED INTERMENDIATE CHINESE I

This course focuses on increasingly sophisticated conversational patterns as well as acquiring the vocabulary necessary for reading basic texts. Course includes regular writing assignments and continued expansion of vocabulary and character recognition. Not open to native or heritage speakers without written permission of instructor. Recommended background: CN 240X Intermediate Chinese IV

CN 1541. ELEMENTARY CHINESE I

An intensive course to introduce the Chinese language (Mandarin) to students with no background in Chinese. Emphasis will be on learning the foundations of the sound system through pinyin and acquiring familiarity with tones. Oral language acquisition will stress structures and vocabulary required for basic communicative tasks. Cultural aspects of China introduced through course material. This class is not open to native or heritage speakers.

CN 1542. ELEMENTARY CHINESE II

Continuation of CN 1541 for non-native, non-heritage speakers. Emphasis on oral communication and vocabulary acquisition continues. Basics of writing system introduced. Not open to native or heritage speakers. Recommended background: CN 1541.

CN 1543. ELEMENTARY CHINESE III

Continuation of CN 1542 Mandarin Chinese. Primary emphasis is on conversational skills, with increased character introduction. Recognition of the most-commonly-used Chinese characters will be required by term end. Not open to native or heritage speakers. Recommended background: CN 1542.

CN 2541. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I

Continuation of CN 1542. Course will focus on practical conversations and recognition of Chinese characters, with greater emphasis placed on reading and writing. Not open to native or heritage speakers. Recommended background: CN 1543.

EN 326X. THEATRICAL PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT

This course explores the managerial aspects of theatrical production, in both the WPI campus and the professional theatre world. Students will investigate the challenges involved with the process of bringing a script to the stage through reading, discussion, and exploration of ongoing productions. Topics covered may include study of the structure of theatrical organizations, recognizing planning techniques for the production process, discovery of organizational dynamics within the theatre environment, and detailed exploration of various managerial tasks within theatrical productions. Students will use knowledge of previous experiences within the theatre, along with readings and assignments, to aid in the discussion that comprises the majority of the course. Recommended background: experience in theatre at level of EN 2222 (Theatre Workshop) or appropriate Drama/Theatre independent studies.

EN 1221. INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA: THEATRE ON THE PAGE AND ON THE STAGE

Cat. I This introductory course will give the student an understanding of the forms of drama, the styles of theatre performance and production, and the emergence of new forms and styles. Research and writing projects, and performance activities will offer the student experience in the theory and practice studied in the course.

EN 1222. SHAKESPEARE IN THE AGE OF ELIZABETH

Cat. I This course is an introduction to Shakespeare, his theatre, and some important concepts of his world. Students will have the opportunity to sample representative Shakespearean tragedies, comedies, and histories. In addition to class discussions and scene work, students will be able to enhance their readings by analyzing video recordings of the plays.

EN 1231. AMERICAN LITERATURE: BEGINNINGS THROUGH HAWTHORNE

Cat. I This survey course covers American literature from its beginnings in the colonial period through the works of Nathaniel Hawthorne in the early nineteenth century. Students will read literary works in a variety of genres (narratives, poems, sermons, plays, stories, and novels) that reflect the emerging nation?s struggle for cultural self-definition. Topics will include the literature of travel and discovery, the faith of the colonial founders, the quest for a distinctive national literature, and the rise of early American fiction.

EN 1242. INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH POETRY

Cat. I This course surveys the poems of our language. From the Anglo-Saxon poems to the popular verse of Tennyson, the songs and the poets are legion: Chaucer, Raleigh, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Herrick, Milton, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, and Hopkins. The England that nourished these writers will be viewed through their ballads, lyrics, sonnets, epigrams, and epics. ?Not marble nor the gilded monuments of princes shall outlive this powerful rhyme.?

EN 1251. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

Cat. I This course introduces the student to a variety of critical perspectives necessary to an understanding and appreciation of the major forms, or genres, of literary expression (e.g., novel, short story, poetry, drama, and essay). Writing and class discussion will be integral parts of this course.

EN 1257. INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

This course examines the formation and history of the African American literary tradition from slave narratives to contemporary forms in black popular culture. The course will explore some genres of African American writing and their relation to American literature and to black cultural expression.

EN 2210. INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL WRITING

Cat.I This course will serve as a gateway into the Professional Writing major but will also be open?and useful?to any student interested in learning about the standard written genres of professional, workplace communication. Students will analyze the history, purposes, conventions, and social consequences of a variety of professional communication, focusing on digital and print correspondence, reports, and proposals directed to internal and external audiences. Students will learn about the culture of a professional environment and the role of writing in structuring identity and relationships within that context. Classes will be conducted as interactive writing workshops in which students assess and respond to rhetorical scenarios and sample texts from a variety of professional worksites. Students will create portfolios, producing professional writing samples they may use on the job market.

EN 2211. ELEMENTS OF WRITING

Cat. I. This course is designed for students who wish to work intensively on their writing. The course will emphasize the processes of composing and revising, the rhetorical strategies of written exposition and argumentation, and the reading and citation practices central to academic inquiry. In a workshop setting, students will write a sequence of short papers and complete one longer writing project based on multiple source texts; learn to read critically and respond helpfully to each other?s writing; and make oral presentations from written texts. Where applicable, the topical theme of the class will be provided via the Registrar?s office.

EN 2213. INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM

Cat. I The course is for students who may wish to make careers in journalism or communications and for those who wish to understand the history, function, production and contemporary challenges of print journalism. Students will analyze articles from newspapers, magazines and Web sites. They will learn and practice the skills of the journalist: finding the story, researching, interviewing, writing on deadline, copy-editing and proof-reading. Classes will also cover matters such as objectivity, fairness, ethics and libel, as well as wider issues of mass communication such as agenda setting, citizen journalism and the implications of converging media.?To give students a more keen sense of audience, work will be read and discussed in class. Students will be urged to write for the college newspaper. Publication beyond the campus will be strongly encouraged.

EN 2219. CREATIVE WRITING

This foundational course in creative writing aims to help students develop or improve the skills of written expression, emphasizing presentation and discussion of original work. Offerings may include generally themed courses covering multiple genres of interest or more specialized workshops in single genres of focus such as fiction, poetry, playwriting, or short prose forms.

EN 2221. AMERICAN DRAMA

Cat. I An investigation into the development of American drama from its beginnings to the present. The history of the emergence of the legitimate theatre in this country will be followed by reading important plays, including the works of O?Neill, Williams, Mamet, Norman, Henley, and others. Discussion of the growth of regional theatres and their importance to the continuation of theatre as a serious and non-profit art form will be included in the course. The student will investigate the importance of theatre practice in the evolution of the dramatic literature of the country.

EN 2222. THEATRE WORKSHOP

Cat. I A workshop course which offers the student the opportunity to explore theatre through creative involvement with playwriting, design, performance, production, and criticism. Students will work in a laboratory situation functioning as a micro-professional theatre which could develop a production that would be staffed and dramaturged from the group.

EN 2224. SHAKESPEARE: NOTHING BUT LOVE

The course focuses on conflicts between personal desire and societal responsibility in such plays as As You Like It, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Winter?s Tale. Through written work and in-class performances, students will examine how Shakespeare both maintains and subverts traditional ideas about marriage and sexual practice. These analyses will take into account contemporary views on gender roles and identity including the early modern cultural ?ideal? of the ?chaste, silent, and obedient? woman. Students will study Shakespeare?s work as literature and also through performance and film adaptations. The WPI library of video recordings will be available for such work.

EN 2225. THE LITERATURE OF SIN

This course begins with selections from John Milton?s provocative version of Adam and Eve?s original sin in Paradise Lost. Focusing on Milton, John Donne and others, we will examine the theme of sin?political, religious, and sexual? in early modern literature. The events of the English Reformation profoundly influenced these writers, and their personal struggles against societal institutions have greatly influenced subsequent literary expressions of rage and rebellion. Students will also be reading texts by contemporary writers such as David Mamet which address the theme of sin in the modern city.

EN 2231. AMERICAN LITERATURE: THE RAVEN, THE WHALE, AND THE WOODCHUCK

Cat. I Emerson challenged the young nation in ?The American Scholar? (1837): If our writers were ?free and brave,? with words ?loaded with life,? they would usher in a ?new age.? The incredibly rich literature that soon followed created an ?American Renaissance.? This was the Age of Reform (1836-65) in more than literature. Writers were caught up in such burning issues as abolitionism, Union vs. secession, and women?s rights. Authors studied may include Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Fuller, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.

EN 2232. AMERICAN LITERATURE: TWAIN TO WORLD WAR I

Cat. I This survey course covers developments in American literature, particularly the movement towards Realism, during the period of turbulent change between the end of the Civil War and the early years of the twentieth century. Topics will include the rebellion against post bellum sentimentalism, the rise of regional writing, the emerging literature of social protest, and literary responses to advances in science, industry, and urban life. Attention will be given to the works of Mark Twain, a prime exponent of turn-of-the-century literary trends, as well as to other pioneer realists (Wharton and Crane).

EN 2233. AMERICAN LITERATURE: MODERNISM TO THE PRESENT

Cat. I This final survey course in American literature covers the modern and contemporary periods, from 1914 to the present, focusing on the literary response to the cultural, intellectual, and social, changes that mark the past century of ferment both within the United States and beyond. The course will include work by dramatists, essayists, novelists, and poets such as, William Carlos Williams, William Faulkner, T. S. Eliot, Ralph Ellison, and Eugene O?Neill.

EN 2234. MODERN AMERICAN NOVEL

Selected works of fiction which appeared after World War I will be the focus of this course. Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, or other authors of the early modern period will be studied, but significant attention will also be given to contemporary novelists, such as Thomas Pynchon, Philip K. Dick, and Toni Morrison. The cultural context and philosophical assumptions of the novels will be studied as well as their form and technique.

EN 2235. THE AMERICAN DREAM: MYTH IN LITERATURE AND THE POPULAR IMAGINATION

Cat. I American writers from our beginnings have been preoccupied with ?The American Dream? as a benchmark for measuring the attainment of our highest ideals as a people. The course examines the political, economic, religious, and rhetorical roots of the concept, assesses its popular and commercial manifestations, and explores the ironies, paradoxes, and continuities that have shaped this national self-image for almost 400 years. Readings include works by Puritan and Revolutionary writers, Native American leaders, Horatio Alger, Jr., William Dean Howells, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Martin Luther King, Jr., Adrienne Rich, Studs Terkel, and Archibald MacLeish.

EN 2237. LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT

This course will examine the many ways in which dramatists, essayists, filmmakers, novelists, and poets have articulated ecological and environmental concerns. Topics to be discussed may include changing attitudes towards terms like `nature? and `wilderness?, the effects of technology on the environment, issues of conservation and sustainability, the dynamics of population growth, the treatment of animals, the production of food, and the presence of the spiritual in nature. Materials will include works by writers such as Wendell Berry, Rachel Carson, Winona LaDuke, Wangari Maathai, Thomas Malthus, Arne Naess, Nicolas Roeg, and Gary Snyder.

EN 2238. AMERICAN REALISM

Cat. I By examining authors who reacted against the so-called ?genteel tradition,? this course attempts to show how various subjects (death, sex, war, slum life and racial prejudice) were treated more honestly in short stories and novels after the Civil War. Authors may include Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, W. D. Howells, Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, Theodore Dreiser, and twentieth century realists. (Formerly EN 3236. Students who have received credit for this course may not receive credit for EN 2238.)

EN 2241. ENGLISH LITERATURE AFTER SHAKESPEARE

Participants in this course will examine outstanding works of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century English literature as these works raise the question: Who is man, and what is his relationship to God, nature, and to his fellow creatures? Writers covered may include Swift, Pope, Keats, Browning, and Dickens.

EN 2242. POPULAR FICTION: READING IN INSTALLMENTS

Cat. I Students in this course will have the opportunity to read two major masterpieces of English fiction the way they should be read: slowly, carefully, and with relish. Victorian novels are long and the term is short, but by reading novels in the way in which they were read by their original readers?serially?we can experience masterworks by Charles Dickens and George Eliot at comparative leisure, examining one serial installment per class session.

EN 2243. MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE

A survey of major modern British authors. The works of many of these writers reflect the political, religious, and social issues of the twentieth century. New psychological insights run parallel with experiments in the use of myth, stream of consciousness, and symbolism. Authors studied may include Hardy, Conrad, Owen, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Eliot, Yeats, and Orwell.

EN 2251. MORAL ISSUES IN THE MODERN NOVEL

Cat. I This course focuses on the problem of how to live in the modern world. Emphasis will be placed on the way moral issues evolve within the complications of individual lives, as depicted in fiction. Such authors as Conrad, Kesey, Camus and Ellison show characters struggling with the questions of moral responsibility raised by love, religion, death, money, conformity.

EN 2252. SCIENCE AND SCIENTISTS IN MODERN LITERATURE

Cat. I This course surveys the ways in which modern literature has represented science and scientists. Beginning with Mary Shelley?s Frankenstein, the origin of what Isaac Asimov calls the ?damned Frankenstein complex" is examined. More complex presentations of science and scientists occur in twentieth-century works like Brecht?s Galileo, Huxley?s Brave New World, and Pirsig?s Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. The course covers major modern works of fiction and drama, including such literary forms as the play, the novel of ideas, and the utopian novel. Attention is focused on the themes (ideas) in, and the structure of, these works.

EN 3011. PEER TUTORING IN WRITING

Cat. I Peer Tutoring in Writing introduced students to the theory and practice of composition. In this course, students research, read, and write about their own and others? literacy practices. Through reading and writing assignments, peer reviews, interviews, presentations, and a tutoring internship in the CCAC, students hone their communication skills while increasing their ability to examine critically the role of communication in the production of knowledge.

EN 3210. TECHNICAL WRITING

Cat. I Technical writing combines technical knowledge with writing skills to communicate technology to the world. This course introduces the fundamental principles of technical communication, and the tools commonly used in the technical writing profession. Topics include user and task analysis, information design, instructional writing, and usability testing. Students learn to use the technical writing process to create user-centered documents that combine text, graphics, and visual formatting to meet specific information needs. Students create a portfolio of both hardcopy and online documentation, using professional tools such as FrameMaker, Acrobat, and RoboHelp. Recommended background: EN/WR 2210, or equivalent writing course.

EN 3214. WRITING ABOUT DISEASE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

Cat. I This writing workshop focuses on the purposed and genres of writing about disease and public health. We will consider how biomedical writers communicate technical information about disease and public health to general audiences; how writers capture the human experience of disease and health care; how writers treat the public policy implications of disease; and how writers design publicity to promote public health. We will examine such genres as the experimental article, news reports, medical advice, profiles, commentary, and public health messages. Recommended background: EN 2211 or equivalent writing courses. Students who have taken EN 3215 may not receive credit also for EN/WR 3214.

EN 3217. CREATIVE WRITING

Cat. I The purpose of this course is to help students develop or improve the skills of written expression. Small groups are formed in which participants present and discuss their original work in either fiction or poetry.

EN 3219. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING

This advanced seminar in creative writing includes sustained attention to the writing of fiction, poetry, and short prose forms among other genres, culminating in final projects (essay, play, poem, story, or some combination thereof) determined by individual interest and in consultation with the instructor. Investigation will also focus on the reading and discussion of exemplary works across genres, with an emphasis on contemporary practice. In the process, regular writing exercises and class visits from established authors will help to create a community of writers grounded in diverse methods. Suggested background: Introductory level creative writing (EN2219 (formerly EN3217) or equivalent).

EN 3222. FORMS IN WORLD DRAMA

The study of the major forms of world drama beginning with the Greeks and ending with contemporary works for the stage. Study will focus upon building skills to effectively analyze form and structure through dramatic content, and to create approaches to staging the plays from an informed understanding of the elements of theatrical style. The course will include plays by preeminent playwrights from cultures around the world. Texts to be studied will vary at each offering.

EN 3223. FORMS IN MODERN DRAMA

The study of the forms in modern drama through application of methods of theatre analysis for dramaturgical consideration and staging. Contemporary playwrights studied will include those from around the world whose work has been seen on international stages since the 1950s. Attention to theatre movements that reflect contemporary issues will be included, and producing groups that have operated with textual revision, minimal text, or no texts will be considered. Texts to be studied will vary at each offering.

EN 3224. SHAKESPEARE SEMINAR

This course would allow for the study of various Shakespearean topics in different years. Some representative subjects could include: ?Shakespeare and the Arts,? ?Shakespeare?s Contemporaries,? ?Shakespeare and Science,? ?Shakespearean Tragedy,? ?Shakespeare?s Roman Plays,? ?Shakespeare?s Histories,? ?Shakespeare on Film.? The topics will be announced before the seminar meets.

EN 3231. NEW ENGLAND SUPERNATURALISM

From the colonial period to the 20th century, New England writers have endowed the region?s people and its settings (fields, forests, buildings, factories, cities) with shapes of fear. This course will explore New England?s fascination with the supernatural from Puritan writings to the contemporary tale of terror. A primary focus of the course will be the genre of New England Gothicism and its literary conventions. Authors studied may include Hawthorne, Longfellow, Whittier, Freeman, Wharton, Jackson, Lovecraft, and King.

EN 3232. THE CONCORD WRITERS

Rural, mid-19th-century Concord, Massachusetts, witnessed an unprecedented flowering of important and influential American literature. Why Concord? We sample writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry D. Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Bronson Alcott, and Louisa May Alcott to explore matters of cultural background, biography, contemporary events, uses of the past, literary vocation, and sense of place. Emphasis is on these writers? friendships and their creative responses to intellectual and social forces of the day?factors that made Concord a community of highly individualistic writers. Students who have received credit for EN 2236 (New England Writers: Concord) may not receive credit for EN 3232.

EN 3233. WORCESTER BETWEEN THE COVERS: LOCAL WRITERS AND THEIR WORKS

Worcester has had a rich and varied literary history from Isaiah Thomas?s founding of the American Antiquarian Society in the early 1800s to the works of S. N. Behrman, Robert Benchley, Elizabeth Bishop, Esther Forbes, Stanley Kunitz, and Charles Olson in the 20th century. This course will examine selections from Worcester area writers in a number of genres (e.g., fiction, drama, poetry, essay, nonfiction memoir). Attention will be given to the local contexts of these writings as well as to each writer?s contributions to the larger continuum of American Literature. Students who have received credit for EN 2236 (New England Writers: Worcester) may not receive credit for EN 3233.

EN 3234. MODERN AMERICAN POETRY

This course examines the poetries and poetics of various modern and contemporary American traditions, focusing on schools and styles from the Modernists and Objectivists through the Black Arts Movement, Confessional Poetry, the New York School, and the San Francisco Renaissance. Attention will also be given to recent innovations in digital poetry, multiethnic poetry, and performance poetry. The course will include poets such as Wallace Stevens, Gwendolyn Brooks, Elizabeth Bishop, A.R. Ammons, Joy Harjo, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Myung Mi Kim, and Saul Williams.

EN 3237. PURSUING MOBY-DICK

Since 1851, readers of Herman Melville?s masterpiece have joined in the chase for the ?meaning? of the White Whale. After briefly examining the philosophical context of Emersonian idealism and the literary example of Hawthorne, the course is devoted solely to a close reading of Moby-Dick? one of the most innovative and mysterious novels in the English language. ?Whose? book is it, anyway? Captain Ahab?s? Ishmael?s? The Whale?s? The reader?s? We conclude by surveying major critical approaches to the novel.

EN 3248. THE ENGLISH NOVEL

Cat. I Participants in this seminar will examine the English novel from its origins in the eighteenth century to its twentieth-century forms, exploring the rich variety of ways a writer may communicate a personal and social vision. The novels treat love, travel, humor, work, adventure, madness, and self-discovery; the novelists may include Fielding, Austen, Dickens, Eliot, Wodehouse, and Woolf.

GN 1511. ELEMENTARY GERMAN I

Cat. I An intensive language course designed to teach concise expression of ideas in writing and speaking. Basic grammar and significant cultural aspects are introduced through the aid of readings, audio-recordings, video, and oral group interaction. (Formerly GN 2616.)

GN 1512. ELEMENTARY GERMAN II

Cat. I A continuation of Elementary German I. Recommended background: GN 1511.

GN 2511. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

Cat. I A continuation of Elementary German II, with increased emphasis on oral and written expression. Basic textbook is supplemented by a collection of simple literary texts by the Grimm brothers, Brecht, and Bichsel. Recommended background: Elementary German II.

GN 2512. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

Cat. I A continuation of Intermediate German I. Recommended background: GN 2511.

GN 3511. ADVANCED GERMAN I

Cat. I Reading and in-class discussion of a wide variety of contemporary nonfictional and fictional texts. Some video viewing. Weekly brief writing assignments and continued expansion of vocabulary. Weekly vocabulary quiz. Review of grammar and introduction to advanced stylistic problems. Recommended background: Intermediate German II.

GN 3512. ADVANCED GERMAN II

Cat. I A continuation of Advanced German I. Recommended background: GN 3511. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

GN 3513. SURVEY OF GERMAN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE FROM 1871 TO THE PRESENT

Conducted entirely in German, the course presents an overview of the development of modern Germany and its culture since the founding of the Second Empire. Background readings in German and English provide the basis for in-class discussion of selected authentic German texts of various kinds: literary works, official documents, political manifestos, letters, and diaries. At least one film will be shown. A number of recurring themes in German culture will inform the content of the course: authoritarianism versus liberalism, idealism versus practicality, private versus public life. Recommended background: GN 3511 (Advanced German I) and GN 3512 (Advanced German II) or equivalent. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

GN 3514. SEMINAR ON SELECTED TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE

The content of the seminar will change from time to time. The course will focus either on an author (e.g., Goethe, Heine, Kafka, Gunter Grass, Christa Wolf ), a genre (e.g., lyric poetry, drama, narrative prose), a literary movement (e.g., Romanticism, expressionism), or a particular literary problem (e.g., literature and technology, writing and the Holocaust, writing and the city). The seminar will be conducted entirely in German. Recommended background: GN 3511 (Advanced German I) and GN 3512 (Advanced German II) or equivalent. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

GN 3516. GERMAN FILM

Cat. II Since its beginnings in the early 20th century, film has been a powerful medium for popular entertainment as well as a potent expression of society?s dreams, fears, and values. Films made in the German-speaking countries are no exceptions, from early expressionist films like The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari through Nazi documentaries like Triumph of the Will to today?s feature films such as Grizzly Man and Run Lola Run! Many German directors have achieved international renown. This course, conducted in German, will examine representative German-language films from various perspectives: historical, socio-political, and thematic. Films will be shown in German with English subtitles. The course will include weekly screenings, discussion sessions, and substantial written assignments. Recommended background: GN 3512 or higher. This course will be offered in 2014-15 and in alternating years thereafter.

HI 1001. WORLD HISTORY

HI 1311. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY

Cat. I An introduction to the history of the American city as an important phenomenon in itself and as a reflection of national history. The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to study the political, economic, social, and technological patterns that have shaped the growth of urbanization. In addition to reading historical approaches to the study of American urban history, students may also examine appropriate works by sociologists, economists, political scientists and city planners who provide historical perspective.

HI 1312. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY

Cat. I An introduction to the historical study of American society. It addresses two questions: What is social history? and how do social historians work?

HI 1313. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF FOREIGN POLICY AND DIPLOMATIC HISTORY

Cat. I An introduction to the various components of U.S. foreign policy decision making and the basic techniques of diplomatic history. The course will focus on one or two topics in the history of American foreign relations, using a variety of primary documents and secondary sources.

HI 1314. INTRODUCTION TO EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY

Cat. I An introduction to historical analysis through selected periods or themes in the history of America before the Civil War. A variety of readings will reflect the various ways that historians have attempted to understand the development of America.

HI 1321. INTRODUCTION TO EUROPEAN SOCIAL HISTORY

Cat. I An introduction to the study of modern European social history since the Industrial Revolution. Topics will include industrialization in Britain and Europe, class formation, gender and the condition of women, technology and economy, culture and society. Students will learn to work with historical sources, to formulate arguments, to read critically, and to write clearly. No prior knowledge of European history is required.

HI 1322. INTRODUCTION TO EUROPEAN CULTURAL HISTORY

Cat. I In this course students think through some of the major intellectual currents that have defined modern Western Civilization. Topics include the philosophical impact of science on modern thought, the development of liberalism and socialism, the crisis of culture in the twentieth century. Students read selections from major thinkers in the Western tradition and develop their skills at critical thinking, analysis, oral and written argument. No prior knowledge of European history is required.

HI 1331. INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

Cat. I An introduction to the methods and source materials historians use to study the past, through the concentrated examination of selected case studies in the history of science. Possible topics include: contexts of scientific discovery, translation and transmission of scientific knowledge, revolutions in scientific belief and practice, non-Western science, social consequences of science.

HI 1332. INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY

Cat. I An introduction to concepts of historical analysis ? i.e., the nature and methodology of scholarly inquiry about the past ? through the concentrated examination of selected case studies in the history of technology. Possible topics include: the influence of slavery on the development of technology in the ancient world and the middle ages; the power revolution of the middle ages; the causes of the Industrial Revolution in 18th-century Britain; and the emergence of science-based technology in 19th-century America.

HI 1341. INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL HISTORY

Cat. I An introduction to the study of global history since 1500. Topics include global expansion, the Columbian exchange, and the slave trade; Renaissance, Reformation, and revolution in Europe; global industrialization, imperialism, and nation building; the world wars and revolutionary movements; decolonization and the Cold War. The course will also discuss case studies of developing nations of interest to students. Especially appropriate as background for students interested in International Studies or any of WPI?s global Project Centers.

HI 2311. AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY

Cat. I This course surveys early American history up to the ratification of the Constitution. It considers the tragic interactions among Europeans, Indians, and Africans on the North American continent, the growth and development of English colonies, and the revolt against the Empire that culminated in the creation of the United States of America.

HI 2313. AMERICAN HISTORY, 1789-1877

Cat. I This course surveys American history from the Presidency of George Washington to the Civil War and its aftermath. Topics include the rise of American democracy, the emergence of middle-class culture, and the forces that pulled apart the Union and struggled to put it back together.

HI 2314. AMERICAN HISTORY, 1877-1920

Cat. I This course surveys the transformation of the United States into an urban and industrial nation. Topics will include changes in the organization of business and labor, immigration and the development of cities, the peripheral role of the South and West in the industrial economy, politics and government in the age of ?laissez-faire,? and the diverse sources and nature of late 19th- and early 20th century reform movements.

HI 2315. THE SHAPING OF POST-1920 AMERICA

This course surveys the major political, social, and economic changes of American history from 1920 to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the Great Depression, the New Deal, suburbanization, McCarthyism, the persistence of poverty, the domestic effects of the Vietnam war, and recent demographic trends.

HI 2316. AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY FROM WOODROW WILSON TO THE PRESENT

This survey of American diplomatic history begins with the legacy of Woodrow Wilson, continues through our apparent isolation in the 1920?s, American neutrality in the 1930?s, World War II, the early and later Cold War periods, and concludes with an overview of the current global involvement of the United States. Some sections of this course may be offered as Writing Intensive (WI).

HI 2317. LAW AND SOCIETY IN AMERICA

Cat. I This survey course explores the dramatic expansion of government?s role in American life between the Civil War and World War I. It does so by examining the response of constitutional, common, and statutory law to the social, economic, and political change associated with this pivotal period in the nation?s history.

HI 2321. EUROPE FROM THE OLD REGIME TO WORLD WAR I

Cat. I A survey of the major socio-economic, political, and cultural developments in European history from the Old Regime to World War I. The course will focu s upon those factors and events that led to the formation of modern European society: Nation-State building, The French Revolution, industrialization; liberalism, democracy, and socialism; national unification of Italy and Germany; the coming of World War I. No prior knowledge of European history is required.

HI 2322. EUROPE SINCE WORLD WAR I

Cat. I A survey of the major political, socio-economic, and cultural developments in European history since World War I. The course will focus upon those factors and events that have led to the current world situation: the World Wars, fascism and communism, the Holocaust, the Cold War, the welfare state, decolonization, post-industrial society, popular culture, the collapse of communism, contemporary Europe. No prior knowledge of European history is required.

HI 2324. INDUSTRY AND EMPIRE IN BRITISH HISTORY

Cat. I A survey of modern Britain from the 18th century to the present. Topics include the British state and national identity, the industrial revolution, political and social reform, the status of women, sport and society, Ireland, the British Empire, the World Wars, the welfare state, economic decline. Especially appropriate as background for students planning IQP?s or Sufficiency Projects in London. No prior knowledge of British history is required.

HI 2325. MODERN FRANCE

This course examines the historical origins of modern France and the distinguishing features of French society and culture. Some of the topics covered include: Bourbon absolutism; the cause and effects of the French Revolution; the struggle for democratic liberalism in the 19th century; class and ideological conflict in the Third Republic; Vichy fascism, and present-day politics in the Fifth Republic. No prior knowledge of French history is required.

HI 2328. HISTORY OF REVOLUTIONS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

A survey of some of the most important revolutionary movements of the twentieth century. We may consider topics such as racial, nationalist, feminist and non-violent revolutionary ideologies, communist revolution, the ?green? revolution and cultural revolution. No prior knowledge of the history of revolutions is expected.

HI 2331. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND CULTURE IN THE EARLY AMERICAN REPUBLIC

This course surveys American science and technology from the first European explorations until the founding of WPI (in 1865). Topics may include: Enlightenment scientific theory and practice in colonial North America; Romanticism and the landscape; the politics of knowledge gained through contact with Native Americans; engineering and internal improvements; geography and resources in a continental empire; the American Industrial Revolution; the rise of science as a profession; the emergence of scientific racism; technology and the Civil War.

HI 2332. HISTORY OF MODERN AMERICAN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Cat. I This course surveys American science and technology from 1859 to the present. Topics may include: Darwinism and Social Darwinism; scientific education; positivism and the growth of the physical sciences; the new biology and medicine; conservation, the gospel of efficiency and progressivism; science, World War I and the 1920s; the intellectual migration and its influence; science technology and World War II; Big Science, the Cold War and responses to Big Science; and cultural responses to science and controversies about science.

HI 2341. CONTEMPORARY WORLD ISSUES IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

This course examines the historical origins of contemporary global crises and political transformations. Students keep abreast of ongoing current events through periodical literature and explore the underlying long-term causes of these events as analyzed by scholarly historical texts. Topics will vary each time the course is taught but may include such topics as the following: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Democratization in Africa, the Developing World and Globalization. No prior knowledge of world history is required.

HI 2343. EAST ASIA: CHINA AT THE CENTER

This course will explore two thousand years of Asian participation in an international system, in Asia and with the rest of the world. Whether ruled by Chinese, Turks, Mongols or Manchus, China has been the political and cultural center of East Asia. Understanding the role of this superpower is critical to Asian and world history. The course will focus on themes such as the cosmopolitan experience, the early development and application of `modern? ideas such as bureaucracy, market economy, and paper currency, and the centrality of religious ideology as a tool in statecraft. No prior knowledge of Asian history is required.

HI 2352. HISTORY OF THE EXACT SCIENCES

This course surveys major developments in the global history of mathematics, astronomy, and cosmology, as manifestations of the human endeavor to understand our place in the universe. Topics may include: Ancient Greek, Ptolemaic, and Arabic knowledge systems; the Copernican Revolution; mathematical thinking and the Cartesian method; globalization of European power through the navigational sciences, applied mathematics, and Enlightenment geodesy; social consequences of probability and determinism in science; theoretical debates over the origins of the solar system and of the universe.

HI 2353. HISTORY OF THE LIFE SCIENCES

This course surveys major developments in the global history of biology, ecology, and medicine, as manifestations of the human endeavor to understand living organisms. Topics may include: Aristotelian biology, Galenic, Chinese, and Arabic medical traditions; Vesalius and the Renaissance; Linnaeus and Enlightenment natural history; Romantic biology and the Darwinian revolution; genetics from Mendel to the fruit fly; eugenics and racial theories as ?applied? biology; modern medicine, disease, and public health; microbiology from the double helix to the Genome project; and the relationship of the science of ecology to evolving schools of environmental thought.

HI 2354. HISTORY OF THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES

This course surveys major developments in the global history of geology, physics, and chemistry, as manifestations of the human endeavor to understand time, space, and the rules that govern inorganic nature. Topics may include: ancient atomism; alchemy and magic; the mechanical philosophy of Galilean and Newtonian physics; Hutton and the earth as eternal machine; energy, forces, matter, and structure in 19th century physics and chemistry; radioactivity, relativity, and quantum theory; the plate tectonics revolution.

HI 2401. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

This course surveys the environmental history of North America from the time of Columbus until the present, exploring how the environment has shaped human culture, and how human activity and human ideas have shaped nature. We will examine changes during three periods: a ?contact? period focusing on the ecological, economic and cultural ramifications of Old World-New World interconnection; a ?development? period focusing on the rise of a market-based, urban-industrial society during the nineteenth century; and a final period characterized by the growth of reform movements to protect nature and the increasing global movement of goods and ideas in the twentieth century. In each period, we will trace changes in production, labor, and consumption patterns; transportation and other technologies; science, knowledge, and planning; disease, health and medicine; and cultural understandings, political debates, and place-making strategies.

HI 2402. HISTORY OF EVOLUTIONARY THOUGHT

This course will trace the history of evolutionary thought, including the growth of the geological sciences and expanding concepts of geological time, increased global travel suggesting new perspectives on biogeography, discoveries of fossils of now-extinct animals, and developments in comparative embryology and anatomy, culminating in the synthesis effected in 1859 by Charles Darwin, and in the Modern Synthesis of the 1940s. It will include emphases on the relationships of evolutionary and religious thought, and on depictions of evolutionary themes in the larger culture, including the arts, film, literature and popular culture, and will examine controversies, including current controversies, over evolution and the teaching of evolution in public schools in the United States.

HI 2403. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

This course will introduce students to global environmental history, a field that examines how the environment has shaped human society, and the effects of human activity and human ideas on non-human nature. The course will trace human history from hunter-gather societies to the present, addressing changes in production, trade, and consumption patterns; transportation and other technologies; science, knowledge, and planning; disease, health and medicine; and cultural understandings, political debates, and place-making strategies. This course is appropriate for students interested in WPI's project centers in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean and Central America.

HI 3311. AMERICAN LABOR HISTORY

Cat. I This seminar course will deal with the history of organized labor in America as well as with the historic contributions of working people, whether unionized or not, to the growth and development of American ideas, politics, culture, and society. Among the topics to be covered will be: the origins, growth, and expansion of trade and industrial unionism; the roots and development of working class consciousness; the underlying causes and eventual resolution of labor disturbances; the philosophical and ideological perspectives of the labor movement. Students will explore topics raised by common readings via written papers, seminar presentations, and work with primary source materials. Suggested background: HI 2314, American History, 1877-1920; or HI 2315, The Shaping of Post-1920 America.

HI 3312. TOPICS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY

Cat. I A seminar course on analysis of selected aspects of social organization in American history, with emphasis on the composition and changing societal character of various groups over time, and their relationship to larger social, economic, and political developments. Typical topics include: communities, families, minorities, and women. Suggested background: Some college-level American history.

HI 3314. THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Cat. I This seminar course considers the social, political, and intellectual history of the years surrounding American independence, paying particular attention to the changes in society and ideas that shaped the revolt against Great Britain, the winning of independence, and the creation of new political structures that led to the Constitution.

HI 3316. TOPICS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY U.S. HISTORY

In this advanced seminar course, students will explore one aspect of twentieth-century U.S. history in more depth. Topics vary each year but may include political movements such as the New Deal or the Civil Rights Movement, an aspect of American foreign policy such as the Cold War, a short time period such as the 1960s, a cultural phenomenon such as consumption, or a geographical focus such as cities or New England. The course will require substantial reading and writing. Suggested background: HI 2314 (American History, 1877- 1920), HI 2315 (The Shaping of Post-1920 America), or other American history courses.

HI 3317. TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

In this seminar course, students will explore one aspect of U.S. or global environmental history in more depth. Topics vary each year but may include environmental thought, environmental reform movements, comparative environmental movements, natural disasters, the history of ecology, built environments, environmental justice, New England environmental history, or the environmental history of South Asia or another region of the world. The course will require substantial reading and writing. Suggested background: HI 2401 U.S. Environmental History.

HI 3321. TOPICS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

This seminar course examines topics in the cultural, socio-economic and political history of modern Europe, with a focus on Great Britain. Topics may vary each year among the following: nationalism, class and gender, political economy, environmental history, sport and society, film and history. Readings will include primary and secondary sources.

HI 3323. TOPICS IN THE WESTERN INTELLECTUAL TRADITION

This seminar course in the history of ideas focuses each year on a different theme within the intellectual-cultural traditions of Western Civilization. Some topics are the following: The Impact of the New Physics on 20th Century Philosophy; The Social History of Ideas; The Enlightenment and the French Revolution; Sexuality, Psycho-analysis, and Revolution. The course is structured around classroom discussion of major texts on the topic under study and a related research paper.

HI 3331. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF EUROPEAN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

A seminar course on the relationships among science, technology, and society in European culture, examined through a series of case studies. Topics from which the case studies might be drawn include: global scientific expeditions, mapmaking, and European imperialism; the harnessing of science for industrial purposes; the role of the physical sciences in war and international relations; the function of the science advisor in government; the political views and activities of major scientists such as Einstein. Students will use primary sources and recently published historical scholarship to analyze the case studies. Suggested background: Courses in European history and the history of science and technology.

HI 3334. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Cat I This seminar will examine a particular issue or theme in the history of American science and technology. Topics will vary from year to year, but may include: technology and the built environment; science, technology and the arts; communications of science and scientific issues with the larger public; technology and scientific illustration; science in popular culture; science and the law; or close examination of episodes in the history of American science and technology such as the American Industrial Revolution; science and technology in the years between the world wars; the Manhattan Project; science and the culture of the Cold War; or science, technology and war in American history. This course will require significant reading and writing. Suggested background: Some familiarity with history of science or history of technology, and with United States history.

HI 3335. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF NON-WESTERN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

A seminar course on the relationships among science, technology, and society from cultures outside Europe and North America, examined through a series of case studies. Topics from which the case studies might be drawn include: Chinese medicine and technology; Arabic mathematics, medicine, and astronomy; Indian science and technology (including, for example, metalworking and textile production); Mayan mathematics and astronomy; Polynesian navigation; various indigenous peoples? sustainable subsistence technologies (e.g. African agriculture, Native American land management, aboriginal Australian dreamtime). Suggested background: Courses in global history and the history of science and technology.

HI 3341. TOPICS IN IMPERIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL HISTORY

This seminar course examines topics in the history of European imperialism, colonialism, and the postcolonial aftermath. Topics vary each year among the following: culture and imperialism, the expansion of Europe, the economics of empire, travel and exploration narratives, imperialism in literature and anthropology, decolonization in Asia and Africa, postcolonial studies. Readings will include primary and secondary sources.

HI 3342. TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE CIVILIZATIONS

This seminar course compares and contrasts major religious, philosophical, social, and political themes in different civilizations. Comparisons will vary each year but may be drawn from Asia, the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East, Africa, and indigenous cultures of the Americas. It examines the historical foundations of these civilizational differences and draws comparisons with common features of Western civilization. One important goal of the course is to enhance student appreciation of non-Western values and traditions.

HI 3343. TOPICS IN ASIAN HISTORY

Cat. I This seminar course examines topics in the cultural, socio-economic, religious and political history of East Asia. Topics vary each year and may include the following: nationalism and the writing of history, travel and exploration narratives, cross-cultural contact, the role of religion and ideology in political history, development and the environment in Asia, film and history, and the place of minorities and women in Asian societies. Suggested background: previous courses on Asia such as HU 1412, HI 2328, HI 2343, or RE 2724.

HU 224X. GLOBAL JUSTICE AND DEVELOPMENT

There is no question that our age is one of increasing and accelerated global connectedness. The world is becoming smaller and as a result, questions about global disparities in economic opportunity, political freedom, access to adequate healthcare, and other related issues are more and more in the foreground for all of us no matter where we live. When we think of solving these complex problems we often talk in terms of `development? (if countries can `develop? proper institutions and social structures they can address these issues) and so there are many ways in which individuals, organizations, and governments have attempted to help both their own communities and others in the development process. This class looks the myriad of issues and responses involved in development from both empirical and theoretical perspectives. We will read texts in development theory and global justice, try to make sense of what a `just? world might look like, talk to individuals that work for organizations that do development work, look at data on the changing needs of various communities around the world, and discuss differing social and cultural norms that impact all of these questions.

HU 225X. FILM STUDIES

This course provides an introduction to the history and theory of film, covering a representative range of genres from short films, silent films, animated films, documentary films, and experimental films to historical and literary adaptations, science fiction films, screwball comedies, thrillers, and westerns. Attention will be given to representative directors, significant theories of film, and national traditions of filmmaking. Directors covered may include D.W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Yasujiro Ozu, and Ingmar Bergman. Film theorists covered may include Andre Bazin, Stanley Cavell, Sergei Eisenstein, Siegfried Kracauer, and Trinh T. Minh-ha.

HU 1401. INTRODUCTION TO HUMANITIES AND ARTS I

Cat. I This course provides an introduction to the Humanities and Arts by examining, discussing, and communicating our ideas about a fundamental question in human experience: what is real and how are claims made for that reality? Students will study this question from the points of view of literature, history, science, and art. HU 1401 is open to all students with preference given to first-year students, especially those who would like to sample several different areas of the Humanities and Arts before deciding on an area of concentration. HU 1402 follows historically from HU 1401 and students are encouraged BUT NOT REQUIRED to take both courses.

HU 1402. INTRODUCTION TO HUMANITIES AND ARTS II

Cat. I This course provides an introduction to the Humanities and Arts by examining, discussing, and communicating our ideas about a fundamental question in human experience: what is real and how are claims made for that reality? Students will study this question from the points of view of literature, history, science, and art. HU 1402 is open to all students with preference given to first-year students, especially those who would like to sample several different areas of the Humanities and Arts before deciding on an area of concentration. HU 1402 follows historically from HU 1401 and students are encouraged BUT NOT REQUIRED to take both courses.

HU 1411. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN STUDIES

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to a number of basic American Studies methodologies. Emphasis will vary according to the instructor, but usually the course will cover the following: the textual and contextual analysis (at the community, national, and transnational levels) of literary works; the relationships between the literary, performing, and visual arts in a specific time period; the analysis of radio, film, television, and digital media forms at the level of production and reception; the mediation and remediation of cultural, social, and political history.

HU 1412. INTRODUCTION TO ASIA

Cat. I This course will explore Asia through an interdisciplinary approach. We will examine tradition and modernity in some or all of four cultural regions?South Asia (India), East Asia (China), Southeast Asia (Vietnam or Thailand), Inner Asia (Tibet)?and globalization in Japan and/or Hong Kong. We will explore the cultural traditions of these various regions, paying special attention to history, religion, society. We will also consider modern developments in these same regions. The impact of colonialism, nationalism, revolution, industrialization and urbanization on the lives of Asian peoples will be illustrated through films and readings. No prior knowledge of Asian history or culture is expected.

HU 2340. POPULAR CULTURE AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN ASIA

Godzilla, kung-fu, anime, sushi, Hello Kitty, yin and yang, Pokemon, manga. All of these have become part of our American lives, but where did they come from and what meaning do they hold as cultural phenomena? In this class we will explore the popular cultures of East Asia to better understand the influences that have shaped the region?s contemporary societies. Focus country will be either Japan or China, depending on term offered. Students will study various media of popular culture, such as films, songs, advertisements, video games, manga, anime, to explore the changing society of these countries. We will link the individual cultural phenomena studied to both internal and external influences, situating popular culture within transnational currents and exchanges when appropriate. No prior knowledge of Asian history is required for this class.

HU 2441. AFRICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE

This survey course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine fundamental issues in African political, social, and cultural history. The course may include various topics, such as ancient African kingdoms, the influence of Islam, the Atlantic slave trade, imperialism and decolonization, contemporary democratization, or African literature and art. Suggested background: HI 1341 Introduction to Global History.

HU 3411. PRO-SEMINAR IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

This course examines the fundamentals of intercultural communication to prepare students to live and work with people from other cultures. It explores how different patterns of thinking and behavior, assumptions and values, have arisen from different cultural traditions and divergent histories in the world. Racism, prejudice, and bigotry?often the result of cultural, social, and technological differences in human experience?are among the concerns of the class. This course cannot teach students how to behave and think in all parts of the world, but it raises questions about ethnocentric assumptions often taken for granted by those working or studying in another culture. It is excellent preparation for an international IQP or educational exchange. Suggested background: Previous courses in Humanities.

HU 3900. INQUIRY SEMINAR IN HUMANITIES AND ARTS

Cat. I This seminar serves as the culmination for a student?s Humanities and Arts Requirement. The seminar provides opportunities for sustained critical inquiry into a focused thematic area. The seminar seeks to help students learn to communicate effectively, to think critically, and to appreciate diverse perspectives in a spirit of openness and cooperation through research, creativity, and investigation. The specific theme of each seminar will vary and will be defined by the instructor. Prior to enrolling in the seminar, a student must have completed five courses in Humanities and Arts, at least two of which must be thematically related and at least one of which must be at the 2000-level or above.

HU 3910. PRACTICUM IN HUMANITIES AND ARTS

Cat. I The practicum serves as the culmination for a student?s Humanities and Arts Requirement. The practicum provides opportunities for sustained critical inquiry into a focused thematic area. The practicum seeks to help students learn to communicate effectively, to think critically, and to appreciate diverse perspectives in a spirit of openness and cooperation through research, creativity, and investigation. The specific theme of each practicum will vary and will be defined by the instructor. Prior to enrolling in the practicum, a student must have completed five courses in Humanities and Arts, at least two of which must be thematically related and at least one of which must be at the 2000-level or above. Consent of the instructor is required for enrollment.

HU 4411. SENIOR SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Cat. I This course is designed to integrate each student?s international courses, projects, and experiences in a capstone seminar in International Studies. Students will reflect on what they have learned in their previous courses and international experiences. They will assess what happened to them overseas, why it happened, and how it might be understood. They will also prepare a paper with an instructor in their area of international studies that integrates their previous academic courses. Students will also explore how they might translate their courses and experiences into future personal and professional opportunities. Recommended background: previous courses in international studies, such as HI 1341 and HU 3411, and completion of an international IQP or an international educational exchange.

ISE 180X. INTRODUCTION TO ACADEMIC READING AND WRITING FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH

The goal of this course is to provide international students for whom English is not their native language the necessary skills for academic success through reading and writing assignments. Students will focus on developing vocabulary, critical reading, paragraph, and essay writing skills. Emphasis is also given to a review of English grammar through intensive written and oral practice to promote accurate and appropriate language use. Strongly recommended for first-year international ESL students. Admission determined by Writing Placement or consent of the instructor.

ISE 181X. COMPOSITION FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH

This course is for international students who want to develop their academic writing skills through a sequence of essay assignments, with emphasis on rhetorical and grammatical issues particular to second language learners (ESL). Students will concentrate on producing coherent paragraphs, developing short essays in a variety of rhetorical modes, and improving mechanics (grammar, punctuation) and vocabulary usage. Both personal and academic writing assignments provide practice in the process of writing and revising work for content and form. Recommended Background: ISE 180X or equivalent skills (determined by Writing Placement or consent of the instructor).

ISE 182X. COLLEGE WRITING FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH

In this course students will practice analytical reading, writing, and thinking intensively, through a variety of exercises and assignments. Emphasis is placed on using various methods of organization appropriate to the writer?s purpose and audience. Students will read and discuss a selection of non-fiction texts; these readings will form the basis for writing assignments in summary, critique, synthesis, and persuasion. The course also stresses the ability to understand, use, and document college-level non-fiction readings as evidence for effectively formulating and accurately supporting a thesis. This course is for international students who have already studied grammar extensively and need to refine the ability to produce acceptable academic English. Recommended Background: ISE 181X or equivalent skills (determined by Writing Placement or consent of the instructor).

ISE 183X. ORAL COMMUNICATION FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH

This course focuses on the speaking and listening skills that are necessary in an academic setting. Students practice formal and informal communication skills, including listening comprehension, pronunciation, and conversational and presentation skills. Students are encouraged to practice oral/aural exercises with the class as a whole and in small groups. Class work will build language skills and personal confidence levels.

ISE 1811. WRITING FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH

Cat. I This course offers, through conferences, tutorial sessions and extensive writing practice, a review of English composition principles for international students. The following topics are included: the motivation of the writer; basic grammar; organization of the paragraph, sentence, and overall essay or report; vocabulary and word choice; spelling hints; and style. Much emphasis is given to the development of effective revising techniques. For the purposes of demonstrating ?depth? and ?breadth,? this course may be considered an English (EN) or Writing (WR) course.

ISE 1812. SPEECH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH

Cat. I This course focuses on developing international students? ability to speak effectively, organize ideas logically, improve voice and diction, and use visual aids. Television and audiotapes are used to record competence and poise. For the purposes of demonstrating ?depth? and ?breadth,? this course may be considered an English (EN) or Writing (WR) course.

ISE 1813. AMERICAN HISTORY FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Cat. I An introduction to American history designed to provide international students with a basic understanding of the history and culture of the United States. Written and oral assignments will also help these students gain a more effective command of the English language. For the purposes of demonstrating ?depth? and ?breadth,? this course may be considered a history (HI) course.

MU 201X. MAKING MUSIC WITH MACHINES

Cat.I. The combination of music and robotics offers exciting possibilities for artistic and technical innovation. While much of the development in this field has been the result of recent efforts, the history of automatic mechanical instruments reaches back centuries. We will consider this history by looking at past designs and listening to the music that has been composed using such instruments. We will also survey modern machines, which have increasingly moved towards robotics with the integration of computer-based processing and sensing capabilities. We will entertain technical and aesthetic questions relating to these systems and their musical output. We will do all of this with our mind open to the question of how we can design new machines to make new kinds of music. Recommended background: Fundamentals of Music I (MU 1611) or Introduction to Music (MU 1511).

MU 202X. MUCIS AND MIND

Cat. I How are we able to distinguish instruments, timbres and pitches from the intertwined sonic stream presented by the world? How do we organize these elements in time to create rhythms, melodies, phrases and pieces? We will explore these questions by considering the cognitive and perceptual processes that shape our musical experience. We will read relevant psychological and musical literature, survey music technologies that are based on psychological principles, and listen to a variety of musical works that illustrate these ideas. Recommended background: MU 1611 (Fundamentals of Music I) or MU 1511 (Introduction to Music).

MU 230X. FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

Cat. I. This course will present ways to facilitate musicianship through the use of technology. Course topics include an introduction to music notation software, MIDI and audio recording, signal processing, and interactive music system programming. The course will address past, current, and emerging trends in music technology as they relate to facilitating an understanding of musical concepts. Recommended background: a basic understanding of music notation and Fundamentals of Music I (MU 1611) are recommended.

MU 362X. ELECTRONIC MUSIC COMPOSITION

Cat. I. This course will address concepts of composition through the use of technology. Students will examine existing compositions in electronic music, art music, popular music, film, multimedia, gaming, and more, and compose new works within these genres. Students will present newly composed works each class and discuss their aesthetic values, musical functions, and technical underpinnings. Recommended background: the ability to read music and familiarity with at least one digital audio workstation or notation software solution such as Logic, GarageBand, ProTools, or Finale.

MU 363X. TOPICS IN MUSIC HISTORY

Cat. II This course focuses on a topic in the history of Western classical music. Topics may vary each year among the following: a single style period (e.g. the Classical Era), a single composer (e.g. Beethoven), a pair of composers (e.g. Bach and Handel), a single genre (e.g. the Symphony), or a genre in a composer?s output (e.g. Mozart?s Operas). The course examines stylistic traits, theoretical concepts, and representative literature, as well as the social and cultural context to better understand the music under study. Recommended background: MU 1511 (Introduction to Music) or MU 1611 (Fundamentals of Music I)

MU 370X. TOPICS IN JAZZ HISTORY

Cat II This course focuses on a topic in the area of jazz history. Topics may vary each year among the following: a single style period (e.g. Bebop), a single musician (e.g. Thelonious Monk), or a pair of musicians (e.g. Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie). Students will not only explore the topic through aural analysis of jazz recordings but also examine relevant social and cultural issues through reading and class discussion. Recommended background: MU 2719 (Jazz History) or MU 2722 (History of American Popular Music)

MU 1511. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC

Cat. I This course, designed for students who have little or no previous experience in music, will present an approach to the study of music that includes studying some concepts of music theory (rhythms, scales, keys, intervals, harmony). The course will also include a study of some of the great masterpieces though listening, reading, and discussion. Recommended background: No previous experience is necessary

MU 1611. FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC I

Cat. I This course concentrates on basic music theory of the common practice period. If time permits, instruction includes ear training, sight singing, and work on scales and intervals. Recommended background: basic knowledge of reading music.

MU 2611. FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC II

Cat. I Fundamentals II is a course on music theory at the advanced level beginning with secondary dominants and modulations and working through 19th-century chromatic harmony.

MU 2631. MEN?S GLEE CLUB

Cat. I The Glee Club is the men?s choral ensemble and the oldest student organization on campus. Glee Club performs many styles and periods of the vast repertoire of music for men?s ensembles. Several times each year the Glee Club and Alden Voices (Women?s Chorale) join forces as the WPI Festival Chorus to perform major works of the repertoire. The Glee Club tours Europe and also performs on tour. Rehearsals are held weekly. Prior singing or music experience is encouraged but not required. Open to all men.

MU 2632. ALDEN VOICES

Cat. I Alden Voices is the women?s choral ensemble. Alden Voices performs many styles and periods of the vast repertoire of music for women?s ensembles. Several times each year Alden Voices and the Men?s Glee Club join forces as the WPI Festival Chorus to perform major works of the repertoire. Alden Voices performs on tour as well as performing on campus. Rehearsals are held weekly. Prior singing or music experience is encouraged but not required. Open to all women.

MU 2633. BRASS ENSEMBLE

Cat. I The Brass Ensemble performs frequently on campus and on tour and is open to students who perform on trumpet, trombone, euphonium, French horn, tuba, or tympani. Renaissance antiphonal music is included in the repertoire. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students are expected to perform with the ensemble and to know how to read music. Permission of the instructor is necessary to register.

MU 2634. JAZZ ENSEMBLE

Cat. I The Jazz Ensemble performs frequently on campus and on tour and plays jazz arrangements written for a small ensemble with major emphasis on improvisation. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students are expected to perform with the ensemble and to know how to read music. Permission of the instructor is necessary to register.

MU 2635. STAGE BAND

Cat. I The Stage Band performs traditional and contemporary big band literature with an emphasis on stylistically appropriate interpretation and performance practice. The ensemble performs frequently on campus and on tour. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students are expected to perform with the ensemble and to know how to read music. Permission of the instructor is necessary to register.

MU 2636. CONCERT BAND

Cat. I The Concert Band is a large ensemble that performs several concerts a year as well as on tour. Membership is open to those who play traditional wind, brass or percussion instruments. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students are expected to perform with the ensemble and to know how to read music.

MU 2637. STRING ENSEMBLE

Cat. I The String Ensemble performs music for string orchestra both on campus and on tour. Members of the string ensemble also comprise the string section for the full orchestra. Rehearsals are held weekly. Students are expected to perform with the ensemble and to know how to read music.

MU 2638. VOCAL PERFORMANCE LAB

Cat. I The Vocal Performance Lab is a performance practice oriented chamber vocal ensemble. This ensemble explores specific stylistic techniques as pertains to the music of the Renaissance, Baroque, twentieth century, jazz, and extended vocal techniques (electronic, digital and experimental). The ensemble meets weekly. Students are expected to be of the highest vocal caliber and should possess advanced sight-reading techniques. Open to both men and women. Permission of the instructor is necessary to register.

MU 2719. JAZZ HISTORY

Through an introduction to the musical contributions of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and others, students are exposed to the chronological development of the language of jazz. Each jazz era is examined in detail including the musical and social contexts which helped define it. Participants are expected to build aural skills with the goal of identifying specific historical periods through the recognition of particular musical characteristics. Students examine in depth one artist of their choice. [This replaces MU 4623. Credit is not allowed for both MU 4623 and MU 2719.]

MU 2720. MUSIC HISTORY I: MEDIEVAL THROUGH THE BAROQUE

This course provides a historical survey of Western music from Medieval through Baroque periods with an emphasis on understanding stylistic traits and theoretical concepts of the eras. Topics include Gregorian chant and secular monophony; evolution of musical notation; development of polyphonic music; and vocal and instrumental genres such as mass, motet, madrigal, opera, cantata, sonata, and concerto, among others. No prior background in music is necessary.

MU 2721. MUSIC HISTORY II: CLASSICAL TO THE PRESENT

Cat. I This course provides a historical survey of Western music from the Classical period to the present with an emphasis on understanding stylistic traits and theoretical concepts of the eras. Topics include the development of genres such as sonata, string quartet, concerto, symphony, symphonic poem, character piece, Lied, and opera; and 20th century trends of impressionism, primitivism, atonality, serialism, minimalism, aleatory music, and electronic music. No prior background in music is necessary.

MU 2722. HISTORY OF AMERICAN POPULAR MUSIC

Cat. I This course will explore the uniqueness of America?s popular music and its origins in the music of Africa and the folk music of Europe. Particular emphasis will be given to the origins and history of rock `n? roll examining its roots in blues and early American popular music. [This replaces MU 4625. Credit is not allowed for both MU 4625 and MU 2722.]

MU 2723. MUSIC COMPOSITION

Cat. I This course will investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Using a progressive series of composition projects, the class will examine aesthetic issues that are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result. The class will examine the medium of presentation - whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods. The class will meet for two weekly sessions of one hour and fifty minutes. Each student will be assigned a performance ensemble. Each performance ensemble will have a weekly two-hour lab.

MU 2730. JAZZ THEORY

Cat. I This course examines harmonic and melodic relationships as applied to jazz and popular music composition. Students are introduced to a wide range of jazz improvisational performance practices. Topics include compositional forms, harmonic structures, major and minor keys, blues, modal jazz, and reharmonization techniques. Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of reading music. [This replaces MU 4624. Credit is not allowed for both MU 4624 and MU 2730.]

MU 3001. WORLD MUSIC

This course introduces students to selected musical cultures of the world, e.g., Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, from the ethnomusicological perspective by examining their musical styles as well as cultural and social contexts. Students will be expected to read materials in interdisciplinary areas, including musical ethnographies. No prior background in music is necessary.

MU 3002. ARRANGING AND ORCHESTRATION

Cat. I Students will study specific characteristics of instruments and the voice to enable them to successfully arrange vocal and instrumental music. Students will need to possess a basic knowledge of music theory. Suggested background for this course is MU 1611 (Fundamentals of Music I) or its equivalent.

MU 3611. COMPUTER TECHNIQUES IN MUSIC

Cat. I This course concentrates on both the technical and artistic aspects of computer music. Topics covered include the MIDI protocol and specification, sequencer design, voice editing, synthesizer architecture, and literature.

MU 3612. COMPUTERS AND SYNTHESIZERS IN MUSIC

Cat. I This course focuses on technical and aesthetic problem solving in computer music. Using programming languages, students propose and design creative solutions to contemporary problems which currently have no commercial solutions. Students work with sequencers, signal processors, synthesizers, MIDI controllers, editors, and programming languages.

MU 3613. DIGITAL SOUND DESIGN

Cat. I This course introduces the student to the theory and practice of digital sound design. It focuses on creative problem-solving in applications where digital audio production is a key component. Topics include digital sound recording and editing, creation and synchronization of digital sound tracks for video, theatrical sound design, and multimedia production.

MU 3614. TOPICS IN MIDI

Cat. I This course examines topics in Music Technology in which the application of MIDI and MIDI systems play a significant role. Topics may vary each year among the following areas: sequencing, live performance, composition, and film scoring. Students can take MU 3614 only one time for credit, but a student interested in taking another version can take a second one as an ISP. Recommended background: MU 1611 (Fundamentals of Music)

MU 3615. TOPICS IN DIGITAL SOUND

Cat. I This course examines topics in Music Technology in which Digital Sound plays a significant role. Topics may vary each year among the following areas: digital editing, audio recording, film scoring, game audio, sound effects, audio production, theatrical sound, and surround sound. Students can take MU 3615 only one time for credit, but a student interested in taking another version can take a second one as an ISP. Recommended background: MU 1611 (Fundamentals of Music).

MU 3616. TOPICS IN INTERACTIVE PROGRAMMING

Cat. I This course examines topics in Music Technology in which Interactive Programming plays a significant role. Topics may vary each year among the following areas: real time performance controllers, algorithmic composition, interface design, sensor technology, and gesture detection. Students can take MU 3616 only one time for credit, but a student interested in taking another version can take a second one as an ISP. Recommended background: MU 1611 (Fundamentals of Music).

PY 1731. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

Cat. I This course provides an overview of key concepts, methods and authors in both fields. These introduce the student to the types of reasoning required for the pursuit of in-depth analysis in each discipline. Emphasis on topics and authors varies with the particular instructor.

PY 2711. PHILOSOPHICAL THEORIES OF KNOWLEDGE AND REALITY

The course provides an introduction to some key problems in epistemology and metaphysics. Epistemology is the branch of philosophy inquiring into the nature and conditions of knowledge and truth. Epistemologists ask such questions as: How should we define knowledge? How has the being of nature and knowledge of nature been represented in Western philosophy and science? Is knowledge objective? What constitutes adequate justification for holding a belief? Are different kinds of bodies treated as differently credible in terms of knowledge production? Is it even possible to know anything about the world at all? Metaphysics explores questions concerning the nature and structure of reality, such as: What is the self? Do souls exist? How important are categories such as gender, race, class, and sexuality in forming our identities? Does God exist? Is reality material, immaterial, or a combination of both? What is time? Am I the same person today that I was yesterday? What kind of a phenomenon is mind or thought and can entities in addition to human beings, such as computers, be said to have this attribute? Students will explore questions such as these and others as they submit their beliefs about the nature of knowledge and reality to philosophical examination. Recommended Background: PY/RE 1731, Introduction to Philosophy and Religion.

PY 2712. SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

This course examines metaphysical and moral questions that philosophers have raised about social and political life. Among questions treated might be: What are the grounds, if any, of the obligation of a citizen to obey a sovereign? Are there basic principles of justice by which societies, institutions and practices are rightly evaluated? What is democracy, and how can we tell if an institution or practice is democratic? To what degree do economic institutions put limits on the realization of freedom, democracy and self-determination? Readings might include excerpts from the works of Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Marx, as well as numerous contemporary philosophers. Suggested background: familiarity with basic concepts in philosophy (as in PY/RE 1731).

PY 2713. BIOETHICS

The purpose of this course is to evaluate the social impact of technology in the areas of biology/biotechnology, biomedical engineering and chemistry. The focus of the course will be on the human values in these areas and how they are affected by new technological developments. The course will deal with problems such as human experimentation, behavior control, death, genetic engineering and counseling, abortion, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. These problems will be examined through lectures, discussions and papers. Suggested background: knowledge of key terms and concepts as given in PY/RE 1731 and PY/RE 2731.

PY 2714. ETHICS AND THE PROFESSIONS: PERSONAL, PROFESSIONAL, AND SOCIAL DILEMMAS.

Cat. II This course will present a framework by which various ethical dilemmas that arise in the professions, especially the science-related professions, can be identified, examined, and evaluated on the level of personal morality, professional codes of ethics, and social values. The goal is to study the solutions of these dilemmas in each of the three levels to determine what relation there may be between them, and whether or not resolutions of a dilemma on one level are appropriate for another level. Ethical concepts, professional codes of ethics, and policy positions will be used to analyze and evaluate these issues in a case study format. Representatives of appropriate professions will be invited to address specific issues pertaining to ethical dilemmas in their field. This course will be offered in 2014-15 and in alternating years thereafter.

PY 2716. PHILOSOPHY OF DIFFERENCE

This course examines difference as a concept and as phenomenon that emerges in everyday experience, especially in regard to identity categories like gender, race, class, sexuality, ability, and species. Students will consider the ontological categories of same and different, normal and abnormal, and self and other as they apply to psychological processes of identify formation and social processes of inclusion and exclusion. We will also explore how our conceptions of difference are influenced by and influence (for example) religion, science, politics, work, and art. Most importantly, we will inquire into the foundations of the categorizations of beings and things that are operative in our contemporary cultures and subject them to intellectual scrutiny. Course readings span a range of philosophical traditions including Continental philosophy, analytic philosophy, Latina/o philosophy, feminist philosophy, queer theory, critical race theory, disability theory, and environmental philosophy. Recommended Background: PY/RE 1731, Introduction to Philosophy and Religion or PY/RE 2731, Introduction to Ethics.

PY 2717. PHILOSOPHY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Cat. I This course will focus on the following questions: What is the scope of the current environmental crisis? What does this crisis reveal about the philosophical presuppositions and dominant values of our intellectual worldviews and social institutions? How can existing social theories help explain the environmental crisis? What implications does the crisis have for our sense of personal identity? What moral and spiritual resources can help us respond to it? Readings will be taken from contemporary and historical philosophers and naturalists. Suggested background: familiarity with basic concepts in philosophy (as in PY/RE 1731).

PY 2718. FREEDOM AND EXISTENCE

This course takes up the question of the relationship between self and other, the tension between freedom and responsibility, and the problem of ethical and political commitment in an alienating world. How is individuality possible in a mass society? To what extent are we responsible for others? What would a philosophy of action look like? In examining such questions, the course will focus specifically on two important movements in 19th and 20th century philosophy, existentialism and phenomenology. Readings might include works by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Levinas, Camus, Beauvoir, Sartre, Fanon, and Merleau- Ponty, as well as contemporary readings by feminist and critical race theorists working within the phenomenological tradition. Students will also encounter some of the great works of existentialist fictionand cinema. Recommended Background: PY/RE 1731, Introduction to Philosophy and Religion.

PY 2719. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

This course is an in-depth consideration of the meaning, value, and consequences of scientific inquiry. Questions explored may include: Does science yield truth? Are the results of scientific inquiry more a reflection of the workings of the human mind than of those of the external world? Do pivotal scientificconcepts like gene, electron, photon, species, and ecosystem point to entities that actually exist? Does the history of science, which includes many refutations of theories once believed to be true, raise questions about whether currently accepted theories should be trusted? By what methods does a scientific community validate knowledge claims and how are these processes affected by social, political, and economic contexts? Does a scientist have a responsibility to conduct morally conscientious research? How does the development of technology affect our spiritual and moral characters? In what ways is science similar to religion and in what ways is it different? The focus of this course may vary each time it is offered from an examination of science in general to an investigation of the foundations of specific branches of science such as physics, biology, environmental science, or social science. Recommended Background: PY/RE 1731, Introduction to Philosophy and Religion or PY/RE 2731, Introduction to Ethics.

PY 2731. INTRODUCTORY ETHICS

Cat. I This course will review at an introductory level theories of ethics, individual figures in the history of ethics, and selected problems in ethics. The emphasis will be on philosophical or religious ethics depending on the instructor.

PY 2732. SUFFERING, HEALING & VALUES

This course examines medicine, not from a scientific or professional view, but from a specificallyhumanistic approach. Using essays, films, fiction, poetry and plays, we will aim to make explicit the moral values most deeply held by practitioners in the healing professions. What other kinds of values can get in the way of those most deeply held aims? What are the responsibilities of a medical professional in today's society? What are the sources of those responsibilities? The course will focus both on professional and personal dilemmas and will help students think through some moral problems that are likely to confront them in their professional and personal lives. The class should also help prepare students to navigate through the tough moral issues they are likely to face, either as a medical professional, a citizen, a parent, a child of parents, or as potentially a sick person themselves. This class proposes to grant students the reflective time to read some of the most eloquent authors on suffering, caretaking, and sickness (for example, Oliver Sacks, Jerome Groopman, Susan Sontag, Leo Tolstoy, Virginia Woolf, Tony Kushner, Tracy Kidder, Perri Klass, etc.) and to express their reflections on these resources in effective communication. Recommended Background: PY/RE 1731 or an introductory level literature course.

PY 2734. PHILOSOPHY AND SPIRITUALITY

Spirituality is a philosophical perspective which stresses the role of virtue in happiness and morality; a psychological perspective on emotions and desire; and an essential dimension of religious life. Found in all religions, it is also personally important for the tens of millions who describe themselves as "spiritual but not religious." This course will investigate the many dimensions of spiritual thought and practice, focusing on questions such as: What similarities/differences exist among the spiritual teachings of traditional religions? What is a spiritual experience, a spiritual lesson, a spiritual life? What is the role of spiritual practices such as yoga, meditation, and prayer? What is the place of spirituality in medicine (e.g., meditation as treatment for stress), our relation to nature (e.g., the experience of a sunset), and political life (e.g., Gandhi, King, spiritual environmentalism)? Beyond scientific knowledge, technological expertise, and common sense, is there such a thing as wisdom? Recommended background: PY/RE 1731, Introduction to Philosophy and Religion.

PY 3711. TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY: CAPITALISM AND ITS CRITICS

The purpose of this course is to expose students to somewhat more advanced and specialized study in philosophy. Its focus will vary, but will typically be one of the following types: a particular philosopher (e.g., Plato, Kant, Mill); a particular philosophical tradition (e.g., Pragmatism, Ordinary Language philosophy, Empiricism); a particular philosophical problem (free will, knowledge of other minds, historical explanation); or a particular philosophical classic (Hegel?s Phenomenology of Mind, Aristotle?s Ethics). The topical theme of the class will be provided as a modified course title in the course description posted online. PY 3711 may be taken only once for credit. Recommended Background: Three courses in philosophy.

PY 3712. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

This course will focus on philosophical questions concerning the following topics: the existence and nature of God; the compatibility of God and evil; the nature of religious faith and the relationship between religion, science and ethics; interpretations of the nature of religious language; the philosophically interesting differences between Western and Eastern religions; philosophical critiques of the role of religion in social life. Authors may include: Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Buber, Tillich, Daly, Nietzsche and Buddha. Suggested background: familiarity with basic religious concepts and terms (as in PY/RE 1731).

PY 3731. PROBLEMS IN ETHICS AND SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY

Cat. I This course will examine in depth selected problems in ethical theory and social philosophy. The specific content or emphasis will be determined by the instructor. Suggested background: knowledge of either PY/RE 2731 or PY 2712.

RE 1731. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

Cat. I This course provides an overview of key concepts, methods and authors in both fields. These introduce the student to the types of reasoning required for the pursuit of in-depth analysis in each discipline. Emphasis on topics and authors varies with the particular instructor.

RE 2721. RELIGION AND CULTURE

Cat. I The purpose of this course is to examine how the two institutions of religion and culture interact and mutually influence one another. To do this a variety of definitions of religion and culture will be presented as well as an analysis of how religion interacts with such cultural phenomena as economics, politics, the state, war and the basic problem of social change. The purpose of this is to obtain a variety of perspectives on both religion and culture so that one can begin to articulate more clearly the different influences that occur in the development of one?s own personal history and the culture in which one lives. Suggested background: knowledge of key terms and concepts as given in PY/RE 1731.

RE 2722. QUESTIONS OF EVIL AND GOOD

Cat. I Notions of good and evil shape many of our day to day religious and philosophical claims and arguments. This course concerns questions and approaches to what is often called ?evil,? through a study of classical and contemporary texts and problems. The focus of the course will vary, but will include metaphysical, moral, and political ideas about kinds and relations of goods and evils from different religious and philosophical perspectives. This study takes into account notions of error, ignorance, wrong-doing, freedom and responsibility evident in contemporary religious and philosophical debate.

RE 2723. RELIGIONS OF THE WEST

The purpose of this course is to examine, from an historical, doctrinal, scriptural and philosophical perspective, major Western religions. The course will focus primarily on Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Other religions will be examined. The course will attend to the social context in which these religions developed and will examine their continuing influence on Western society. Suggested background: RE/PY 1731 and RE 2721.

RE 2724. RELIGIONS OF THE EAST

The purpose of this course is to examine, from the perspectives of history text, practice, and philosophy, some or all of the following religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. The course will attend to the social context in which these religions began, their relations with their culture, their rituals and their continuing influences in the East and West. Suggested background: PY/RE 1731 and RE 2721.

RE 2731. INTRODUCTORY ETHICS

Cat. I This course will review at an introductory level theories of ethics, individual figures in the history of ethics, and selected problems in ethics. The emphasis will be on philosophical or religious ethics depending on the instructor.

RE 2732. SUFFERING, HEALING & VALUES

This course examines medicine, not from a scientific or professional view, but from a specifically humanistic approach. Using essays, films, fiction, poetry and plays, we will aim to make explicit the moral values most deeply held by practitioners in the healing professions. What other kinds of values can get in the way of those most deeply held aims? What are the responsibilities of a medical professional in today?s society? What are the sources of those responsibilities? The course will focus both on professional and personal dilemmas and will help students think through some moral problems that are likely to confront them in their professional and personal lives. The class should also help prepare students to navigate through the tough moral issues they are likely to face, either as a medical professional, a citizen, a parent, a child of parents, or as potentially a sick person themselves. This class proposes to grant students the reflective time to read some of the most eloquent authors on suffering, caretaking, and sickness (for example, Oliver Sacks, Jerome Groopman, Susan Sontag, Leo Tolstoy, Virginia Woolf, Tony Kushner, Tracy Kidder, Perri Klass, etc.) and to express their reflections on these resources in effective communication. Recommended Background: PY/RE 1731 or an introductory level literature course.

RE 3721. TOPICS IN RELIGION

The purpose of this course is to expose students to somewhat more advanced or specialized study in religion. The focus will vary, but the material will be drawn from a particular religious thinker, a particular religious tradition or a particular historical or contemporary problem. The topical theme of the class will be provided as a modified course title in the course description posted online. RE 3721 may be taken only once for credit.

RE 3731. PROBLEMS IN ETHICS AND SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY

Cat. I This course will examine in depth selected problems in ethical theory and social philosophy. The specific content or emphasis will be determined by the instructor. Suggested background: knowledge of either RE/PY 2731 or PY 2712.

SP 357X. LANGUAGE/CUTRL IMMERS-BUEN AIR

SP 1523. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I

Cat. I A very intensive course that will introduce the student to the basic grammar of Spanish, emphasizing the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. It will also introduce the student to different aspects of Hispanic cultures in the U.S. and in Spanish-speaking countries. Students who have taken Spanish in high school are urged to take a placement exam before enrolling in either level of Elementary Spanish. To enroll in this course, you must obtain written permission from one of the Spanish professors. This course is reserved for those students with only one year of high school Spanish or with no previous experience. This course is closed to native speakers of Spanish and heritage speakers except with written permission from the instructor.

SP 1524. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II

Cat. I A continuation of Elementary Spanish I. Recommended background: SP 1523. This course is closed to native speakers of Spanish and heritage speakers except with written permission from the instructor.

SP 2521. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

Cat. I A course designed to allow students to improve their written and oral skills, expand their vocabulary and review some important grammatical structures. Students will also read short stories and poems by some of the most representative Spanish American and Spanish authors, such as Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriela Mistral and Ana Maria Matute. Recommended background: Elementary Spanish II. This course is closed to native speakers of Spanish and heritage speakers except with written permission from the instructor.

SP 2522. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

Cat. I A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Recommended background: SP 2521. This course is closed to native speakers of Spanish and heritage speakers except with written permission from the instructor.

SP 3521. ADVANCED SPANISH I

Cat. I A course that continues to improve students? language skills while deepening their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Some of the topics studied are: the origins of Hispanic cultures in Spain and Spanish America; family; men and women in Hispanic societies; education; religion. Recommended background: Intermediate Spanish II. This course is closed to native speakers of Spanish except with written permission from the instructor.

SP 3522. ADVANCED SPANISH II

Cat. I A continuation of Advanced Spanish I. Recommended background: SP 3521. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement. This course is closed to native speakers of Spanish except with written permission from the instructor.

SP 3523. TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE

Cat. II An introduction to various aspects of life in Latin American countries from early times to the present. Focusing on the social and political development of Latin America, the course will reveal the unity and diversity that characterize contemporary Latin American culture. Typical topics for study include: the precolumbian civilizations and their cultural legacy; the conquistadores and the colonial period; the independence movements; the search for and the definition of an American identity; the twentieth-century dictatorships; and the move toward democracy. Recommended background: SP 3521 (Advanced Spanish I) and SP 3522 (Advanced Spanish II) or equivalent. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3524. SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

This course, taught in the Spanish language, focuses on the major literary movements in Spanish America, from the ?Modernista? movement at the turn of the century to the Latin American ?Boom? of the 1960s to the political literature of the `70s and `80s. The work of representative authors, such as Ruben Dario, Julio Cortazar, Rosario Castellanos, Elena Poniatowska, will be discussed. Recommended background: SP 3521 (Advanced Spanish I) and SP 3522 (Advanced Spanish II) or equivalent. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3525. SPANISH AMERICAN FILM/MEDIA: CULTURAL ISSUES

Through Latin American and Caribbean films, and other media sources, this course studies images, topics, and cultural and historical issues related to modern Latin American and the Caribbean. Within the context and influence of the New Latin American Cinema and/or within the context of the World Wide Web, radio, newspapers, and television the course teaches students to recognize cinematographic or media strategies of persuasion, and to understand the images and symbols utilized in the development of a national/regional identity. Among the topics to be studied are: immigration, gender issues, national identity, political issues, and cultural hegemonies. Taught in advanced level Spanish. May be used toward foreign language Minor, or Major. Recommended Background: SP 2521 and SP 2522, and SP 3523. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3526. COMPARATIVE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTS

The basis of this course is a comparative study and analysis of specific Latin American and Caribbean business practices and environments, and the customs informing those practices. SP/ID 3526 focuses on countries such as Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Puerto Rico, and Costa Rica. The course?s main objective is to study communication strategies, business protocol, and negotiation practices in the countries mentioned above. Through oral presentations and written essays, students will have the opportunity to explore other countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Taught in advanced level Spanish. May be used toward foreign language Minor, or Major. Recommended Background: SP 2521 and SP 2522. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3527. TECHNICAL AND BUSINESS SPANISH

The course focuses on the linguistic concepts, terminology, and grammar involved in business and technical Spanish. Students will be required to produce and edit business documents such as letters, job applications, formal oral and written reports, etc. The objective of this course is to help students develop the basic written and oral communication skills to function in a business environment in Latin America and the Caribbean. Recommended background: SP 2521 and SP 2522. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3528. SPANISH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION

This course is an introduction to various aspects of life in Spain, from early times to the present. The main focus is on Spain?s social, political, and cultural development and its experience of diversity within its European context. Typical topics for study include: The Reconquista and the Arab influence in Spanish culture, the Spanish monarchy, its evolution into a democracy, the development of modern politics, the importance of the Spanish Civil war, and the influence of writers (such as Federico Garcia Lorca), painters (such as Pablo Picasso), and art in general in modern Spanish culture. This course is taught in Spanish. Recommended background: SP 3521 (Advanced Spanish I) and SP 3522 (Advanced Spanish II) or equivalent. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3529. CARIBBEANNESS: VOICES OF THE SPANISH CARIBBEAN

A survey of Caribbean literature and arts that takes a multimedia approach to examining the different voices that resonate from the Spanish Caribbean and what appears to be a constant search for identity. By studying the works of major authors, films, music and the plastic arts, we will examine the socio-cultural context and traditions of this region in constant search for self-definition. Special attention will be given to the influential role ethnicity, colonialism, gender and socio-economic development play in the interpretation of works from Puerto Rico, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Colombia and Venezuela as well as those of the Caribbean diaspora. This course is taught in Spanish. Recommended background: S P3521 (Advanced Spanish I) and SP 3522 (Advanced Spanish II) or equivalent. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3530. SPANISH FILM/MEDIA: CULTURAL ISSUES

Cat. II Through Spanish films, and other media sources, this course studies images, topics, and cultural and historical issues that have had an impact in the creation of a modern Spanish nation. This course focuses on current political and ideological issues (after 1936), the importance of Spanish Civil war, gender identity, and class, cultural and power relationships. This course is taught in Spanish. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3531. CONTEMPORARY US LATINO LITERATURE & CULTURE

This course introduces students to the field of Latino studies, paying particular attention to the cultural productions of U.S. Latinos in film, theater, music, fiction writing and cultural criticism. At the same time that this course reflects upon a transnational framework for understanding the continuum between U.S. Latinos and Latin American/Caribbean communities, we closely examine more U.S. based arguments supporting and contesting the use of Latino as an ethnic racial term uniting all U.S. Latino communities. We examine the ways in which U.S. Latinos have manufactured identities within dominant as well as counter cultural registers. In this course, special attention is given to the aesthetics of autobiography and to how Latino writers experiment with this genre in order to address changing constructions of immigration, language, exile, and identity. This course is taught in English. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

SP 3532. STUDIES IN SPANISH LITERATURE: ARTISTIC EXPRESSION AND NATION BUILDING

This course introduces students to the study of Spanish literature through analytical readings of essays, poetry, drama, and fiction of representative Spanish writers from medieval to contemporary times. The selected authors to be studied reflect Spanish society?s cultural and political efforts conducive to a nation building process. Among the topics to be covered are: Literary and artistic movements, nationalist and religious discourses, cultural miscegenation, gender issues, regional, political and class conflicts, the role of the intellectual, and strategies for the construction of identities. This course is taught in Spanish. Recommended Background: SP 3522 and SP 3528. This course satisfies the Inquiry Practicum requirement.

WR 101X. INTRODUCTION TO RHETORIC

This course will apply classical and modern rhetorical concepts to analyze various texts and speeches in order to identify the means of persuasion to a particular end. Students will write short analytical papers that critically assess various rhetorical and communicative approaches. The goal of this course is to enable students to see rhetoric in action in order to both engage with the material critically as well as produce effective discourse to meet various situations.

WR 201X. ELEMENTS OF STYLE

This seminar will cover basic principles of prose style for expository and argumentative writing. Students will learn to evaluate writing for stylistic problems and will learn revision strategies for addressing those problems. The ultimate goal of the seminar is to help students write sentences and paragraphs that are clear, concise, and graceful. In the first part of the course, students will review parts of speech, basic sentence types, and sentence and paragraph structure in order to understand how sentences are put together and the impact their construction has on readers. Then, through hands-on writing exercises and extensive revision of their own and others? writing, students will learn strategies for tightening their prose (concision), achieving ?flow? (cohesion and coherence) and improving usage (language specificity and precision). Recommended background: WR 1010, Elements of Writing.

WR 330X. CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION

This course will examine how people from differing cultural backgrounds communicate, in similar and different ways among themselves, and how they endeavor to communicate across cultures. Students will develop a personal and theoretical understanding of the cultural origin of people?s values, ideologies, habits, idiosyncrasies and how they affect communication across cultural, racial, ethnic and gender lines. Through observing, studying and experiencing incidents of cross-cultural communication, they will begin to examine and develop skills that are necessary for effective understanding and for successful intercultural communication among majority and minority groups. Recommended Background: WR 1010 Elements of Writing

WR 410X. ANALYTICS: NUMBERS TO ARGUMENTS

This course will introduce students to methods and processes for writing documents based on large complex data sets. Students will learn methods for analytics-based presentations including invention, organization, interpretation, and form. The course will briefly examine database development but through a rhetorical lens, as a way to understand how database structures influence information production. The majority of the course will cover case statements, metrics, data literacy, verification and utility, and operational applications for analytics. Readings and assignments will include some theory, problem-based learning, and case studies. Suggested Background: Two courses in Rhetoric and/or Writing. Helpful courses could also include one of: WR 3210 Technical Writing, WR 3310 Digital Rhetoric; WR 2211Rhetoric of Visual Design, CS3431 Database Systems I; MA 2611 Applied Statistics I; MIS 3720 Business Data Management; BUS 2080 Data Analysis for Decision Making; or equivalent

WR 430X. ACADEMIC SCIENCE WRITING

This course focuses on effective communication within a scientific or technical community. Students will analyze a number of genres, such as academic articles, research reports, grants, lab reports, and conference proceedings in order to codify the conventions. Students will then switch from analysis to production, writing and revising disciplinary writing for academic and specialized audiences. Recommended background: WR 1011 Writing About Science & Technology, WR 2211 Rhetoric of Visual Design, WR 3210 Technical Writing, WR 3214 Writing About Disease and Public Health, or equivalent

WR 1010. ELEMENTS OF WRITING

Cat. I. This course is designed for students who wish to work intensively on their writing. The course will emphasize the processes of composing and revising, the rhetorical strategies of written exposition and argumentation, and the reading and citation practices central to academic inquiry. In a workshop setting, students will write a sequence of short papers and complete one longer writing project based on multiple source texts; learn to read critically and respond helpfully to each other?s writing; and make oral presentations from written texts. Where applicable, the topical theme of the class will be provided via the Registrar?s office. Note: Students who have taken EN/WR 2211 cannot receive credit for this course.

WR 1011. WRITING ABOUT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Cat.I This course will examine the appropriate dissemination of scientific information in common science writing genres such as science journalism, consulting reports and white papers, and policy and procedure documents. In a workshop setting, students will write and revise documents that promote broad understanding of scientific research and analysis of specialized knowledge. Course lectures and discussions investigate ethics of scientific reporting and teach students how to recognize deceptive texts and arguments (both quantitative and qualitative). The course is reading and writing intensive and is intended for students with backgrounds in a scientific discipline who are interested in applying their disciplinary knowledge. Note: Students who have taken EN/WR 2211 cannot receive credit for this course.

WR 2210. BUSINESS WRITING AND COMMUNICATION

Cat. I. This course emphasizes the standard written genres of professional, workplace communication. Students will analyze the history, purposes, conventions, and social consequences of a variety of business communications, focusing on digital and print correspondence, reports, and proposals directed to internal and external audiences. Students will learn about the culture of a professional environment and the role of writing in structuring identity and relationships within that context. Classes will be conducted as interactive writing workshops in which students assess and respond to rhetorical scenarios and sample texts from a variety of professional worksites. Students will create portfolios, producing professional writing samples they may use on the job market. Suggested background: WR 1010 or WR 1011. Note: Students who have taken EN/WR 2210 cannot receive credit for this course.

WR 2211. ELEMENTS OF WRITING

Cat. I. This course is designed for students who wish to work intensively on their writing. The course will emphasize the processes of composing and revising, the rhetorical strategies of written exposition and argumentation, and the reading and citation practices central to academic inquiry. In a workshop setting, students will write a sequence of short papers and complete one longer writing project based on multiple source texts; learn to read critically and respond helpfully to each other?s writing; and make oral presentations from written texts. Where applicable, the topical theme of the class will be provided via the Registrar?s office.

WR 2213. INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM

Cat. I. The course is for students who may wish to make careers in journalism or communications and for those who wish to understand the history, function, production and contemporary challenges of print journalism. Students will analyze articles from newspapers, magazines and Web sites. They will learn and practice the skills of the journalist: finding the story, researching, interviewing, writing on deadline, copy-editing and proof-reading. Classes will also cover matters such as objectivity, fairness, ethics and libel, as well as wider issues of mass communication such as agenda setting, citizen journalism and the implications of converging media. To give students a more keen sense of audience, work will be read and discussed in class. Students will be urged to write for the college newspaper. Publication beyond the campus will be strongly encouraged.

WR 2310. VISUAL RHETORIC

Cat. I This course explores how visual design is used for purposes of identification, information, and persuasion. It looks at many modes of visual communication, such as icons, logos, trademarks, signs, product packaging, infographics, posters, billboards, ads, exhibits, graffiti, page layout, films, television, videogames, and web sites. The course provides an overview of the history of graphic design movements, as well as analytical tools to understand how visual design encodes messages and the role visual communication plays in contemporary culture. Students will write about and create a number of visual media in this projectcentered class. Suggested background: WR 1010 Note: Students who have taken EN/WR 3211 cannot receive credit for this course.

WR 3011. TEACHING WRITING

Teaching Writing introduces students to the theory and practice of written composition. Students research and read about the writing process and how best to support it through the practice of explicit teaching and tutoring. They learn specific strategies that can support writers as they plan, draft, and revise written work in a number of genres, and they study effective ways to provide helpful feedback on drafts. They also learn about and practice navigating the social, political and interpersonal dynamics of the teacher/tutor-student relationship through a tutoring internship at the Writing Center and through assignments prompting them to develop lesson plans and instructional handouts. This course will help students improve their own writing and read their own and others? writing more critically. It will be especially useful for those who plan to teach or tutor writing in the future. Recommended background: WR 1010 Elements of Writing Note: Students who have taken WR/EN 3011 Peer Tutoring in Writing cannot receive credit for this course.

WR 3112. RHETORICAL THEORY

Cat. I. Rhetoric concerns both the art of mastering the available means of persuasion and the study of how oral, written, and visual communication projects the intentions of individuals and groups, makes meanings, and affects audiences. The purpose of this course therefore is two-fold. It is intended to help students become more effective communicators by learning about the rhetorical situation and various rhetorical techniques, and it is designed to help them understand how various forms of communication work by learning some of the philosophies and strategies of rhetorical analysis. Recommended background: Introduction to Rhetoric. Note: Students who have taken RH 3112 cannot receive credit for this course.

WR 3210. TECHNICAL WRITING

Cat. I. Technical writing combines technical knowledge with writing skills to communicate technology to the world. This course introduces the fundamental principles of technical communication, and the tools commonly used in the technical writing profession. Topics include user and task analysis, information design, instructional writing, and usability testing. Students learn to use the technical writing process to create user-centered documents that combine text, graphics, and visual formatting to meet specific information needs. Students create a portfolio of both hardcopy and online documentation, using professional tools such as FrameMaker, Acrobat, and RoboHelp. Recommended background: WR 1010, or equivalent writing course.

WR 3214. WRITING ABOUT DISEASE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

Cat. I. This writing workshop focuses on the purposed and genres of writing about disease and public health. We will consider how biomedical writers communicate technical information about disease and public health to general audiences; how writers capture the human experience of disease and health care; how writers treat the public policy implications of disease; and how writers design publicity to promote public health. We will examine such genres as the experimental article, news reports, medical advice, profiles, commentary, and public health messages. Recommended background: WR 1010 Elements of Writing or equivalent writing courses.

WR 3217. CREATIVE WRITING

Cat. I The purpose of this course is to help students develop or improve the skills of written expression. Small groups are formed in which participants present and discuss their original work in either fiction or poetry.

WR 3310. DIGITAL RHETORIC

This course will explore the changing nature of rhetoric and communication in a digital environment by articulating a theory of rhetoric that accounts for digital communication. In a seminar format, students will read and respond to a number of readings that consider the roles of databases, algorithms, social networks, and the like on contemporary communication practices. Students will put into practice their theories on digital rhetoric through a series of class projects: website design, podcasting, interactive storytelling, database design, virtual representations, and the like. Throughout the course, students will recursively understand their practices through theoretical works and gain new insight into theory through the practice of writing in digital spaces. Recommended background: WR 2211 Rhetoric of Visual Design.

WR 4111. RESEARCH METHODS IN WRITING

Cat. I This methodology course introduces students to issues in the study of writing such as the history and uses of literacy, the relationship of thought to language, the role of writing in producing knowledge, and research on composing. The focus of the course will be on professional and academic writing. In this project-based class, students will develop research questions, construct a relevant method study, and carry out that study. The purpose of this course is to add to students analytical approaches to writing and communicative situations. Recommended background: WR 1010 Elements of Writing, WR 2310 Rhetoric of Visual Design, WR 3112 Rhetorical Theory. Note: Students who have taken RH 3111 cannot receive credit for this course.

 
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