Courses

CHE 230X. NANOBIOTECHNLGY LAB EXPERIENCE

CHE 320X. ENERGY CHALLENGES IN THE 21ST CENTURY

The goal of this course is to prepare students for future work in energy-related fields by providing an overview of the challenges related to energy production. Students will study several major energy systems. The details of such energy systems will be examined using engineering principles, particularly focusing on relevant chemical processes. Students will also become familiar with environmental and economic issues related to energy production. Topics to be covered may include: fossil fuels, the hydrogen economy, biofuels, nuclear energy, fuel cells, batteries, and the electricity grid. Recommended background: knowledge of chemistry (CH 1010, 1020, 1030), mathematics (MA 1021), and engineering principles.

CHE 1011. INTRODUCTION TO CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Cat. I. This course provides an introduction to the broad and vital discipline of chemical engineering including conventional and developing chemical technologies. An introduction is provided to the first principles of chemical engineering, as well as environmental, health, safety and ethical issues in chemical engineering practice. An overview is provided of the chemical engineering profession, career choices, the course of study, and a survey of the chemical industry, e.g., polymer, pharmaceutical, food processing, microelectronic, electrochemical, biotechnology, process control, energy, and petroleum refining. Course activities include guest speakers and plant trips. Recommended for first-year students with a basic knowledge of chemistry.

CHE 2011. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS

Cat. I This first course in chemical engineering is designed to give students the ability to use techniques and solve problems of interest to chemical engineers. Students will learn fundamental material by completing analysis, design, and/or laboratory projects. Topics covered include: material balances and stoichiometry, pressure, volume, and temperature behavior of pure fluids, 1st law of thermodynamics, vapor-liquid equilibria with ideal thermodynamics, and staged separation processes. Recommended background: Elementary college chemistry and calculus. Students may not receive credit towards CHE distribution requirements for both CHE 2011 and CM 2001.

CHE 2012. ELEMENTARY CHEMICAL PROCESSES

Cat. I This course aims to build a strong foundation in analysis of chemical processes via a project-based approach. Topics covered include analysis and design of stagewise separation processes such as distillation, 1st and 2nd law (of thermodynamics) analysis of power and refrigeration cycles, and application of material and energy balances in industrial chemical processes, including those with recycle and non-ideal systems. Recommended background: Elementary college chemistry and calculus and some familiarity with the topics listed in CHE 2011. Students may not receive credit towards CHE distribution requirements for both CHE 2012 and ES 3000.

CHE 2013. APPLIED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS

Cat. I This course uses a project-based approach to build confidence and competence in the use of chemical engineering thermodynamics for the analysis and design of chemical processes. Topics covered include extractive separation systems, solution thermodynamics and nonreacting multicomponent mixtures, phase equilibria and property changes on mixing. Recommended background: Elementary college chemistry and calculus and some familiarity with the topics listed in CHE 2011 and CHE 2012. Students may not receive credit towards CHE distribution requirements for both CHE 2013 and CM 2102.

CHE 2014. ADVANCED CHEMICAL PROCESSES

Cat. I This course builds on prior work in material and energy balances, chemical engineering thermodynamics, and stagewise separation processes to facilitate student mastery and design of more complex processes. Topics covered include chemical reaction equilibria, material and energy balances for non-steady state systems, combined material and energy balances, humidification, and batch distillation. Recommended background: Elementary college chemistry and calculus and some familiarity with the topics listed in CHE 2011, CHE 2012, and CHE 2013. Students may not receive credit towards CHE distribution requirements for both CHE 2014 and CM 2002.

CHE 2301. NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY EXPERIENCE

The current developments and experimental skills in nanoscale bioscience and biotechnology will be introduced. Experimental skills such as nanomaterials synthesis, electron microscopy and introductory biotechnology techniques are presented. This course will provide students training in laboratory technique and data handling. Recommended background: CH 1010 or equivalent.

CHE 3201. KINETICS AND REACTOR DESIGN

Cat. I Techniques for experimentally determining rate laws for simple and complex chemical reactions, the mechanisms and theories of chemical reactions, the function of catalysts, and the design of isothermal, adiabatic, batch and flow reactors. The course is intended to provide chemists and chemical engineers with the conceptual base needed to study reactions and perform in the design and analysis of reactors. Recommended background: differential equations, thermodynamics and some organic chemistry.

CHE 3301. INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

This course is an introduction to the chemical engineering principles involved in modern applications of biological engineering. Topics may include: an introduction to biology, biochemistry, physiology, and genomics; biological process engineering including fermentation, mammalian cell culture, biocatalysis, and downstream bioseparations; drug discovery, development, and delivery; environmental biotechnology; and chemical engineering aspects of biomedical devices. Recommended background: material and energy balances, thermodynamics, organic chemistry, and differential equations.

CHE 3501. APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Cat. I The consolidation of the methods of mathematics into a form that can be used for setting up and solving chemical engineering problems. Mathematical formulation of problems corresponding to specific physical situations such as momentum, energy and mass transfer, and chemical reactions. Analytical and numerical techniques for handling the resulting ordinary and partial differential equations and finite difference equations. Recommended background: ordinary differential equations, partial derivatives and vectors, momentum heat and mass transfer.

CHE 3910. CHEMICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

Day trips to industrial plants provide an insight into the real world of the chemical industry. Advanced technologies for commercially producing major organic chemicals and the monomers and polymers derived from them are described. Petroleum refining, catalytic and thermal petrochemical processes, soaps and detergents, specialty chemicals, and antibiotic production processes are presented at the industrial level. Large scale unit operations and processes are seen on the plant trips. Students see how plant layout is integrated with process and product control and environmental protection at each facility. Particular attention is paid to plant scale processes and equipment for control of chemical spills, hazards, and environmental pollution, for safety and accident prevention, and for compliance with local and national laws. Recommended background: general understanding of Organic Chemistry and Material Balances is assumed.

CHE 3920. AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT

This course discusses the sources, sinks, ambient concentrations and effects of major gaseous and particulate air pollutants. The course is problem oriented and applied engineering methods to develop strategies for managing air quality on a local, regional and global scale. Topics include: indoor air quality, regional air shed modelling, global atmospheric change and design and efficiencies of air pollution control devices. Recommended background: knowledge of chemistry, mathematics and engineering principles.

CHE 4063. TRANSPORT & TRANSFORMATIONS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

In this course, students will learn to make quantitative relationships between human activities and the effects on water, soil, and air in the environment. Students will learn the scientific and engineering principles that are needed to understand how contaminants enter and move in the environment, how compounds react in the environment, how to predict their concentrations in the environment, and how to develop solutions to environmental problems. Topics to be covered may include water quality engineering (including microbial interactions), air quality engineering, and hazardous waste management. Recommended Background: familiarity with transport phenomena, such as in ES 3004 (Fluid Mechanics) and ES 3002 (Mass Transfer), and familiarity with reaction kinetics and reactor design, such as through CHE 3201 (Kinetics and Reactor Design). Background such as CE 3059 (Environmental Engineering), CE 3060 (Water Treatment), or CE 3061 (Wastewater Treatment) is suggested.

CHE 4401. UNIT OPERATIONS OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING I

Cat. I Laboratory-application of fundamental theories to practical chemical engineering operations. Emphasis is on building the student?s understanding and ability to approach the problems of design and operations of large scale chemical processing equipment. The course is a combination of lectures and laboratory projects in the area of unit operations. Laboratory projects include experiments in fluid-flow phenomena through various media such as: friction in conduits, filtration, pressure drop in packed towers, fluidization of solids, and spray drying. Students are expected to carry out the planning and execution of experimental work as well as the analysis and reporting of experimental results in both written and oral format. Recommended background: knowledge of chemistry, mathematics and engineering principles.

CHE 4402. UNIT OPERATIONS OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING II

Cat. I Overall format and procedure are essentially the same as in Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering I. Laboratory projects include experiments in heat and mass transfer such as: heat transfer in two heaters and a cooler, climbing film evaporation, multiple effect evaporation, absorption, extraction, distillation and rotary drying of solids. Recommended backgound: familiarity with techniques and procedures emphasized in CHE 4401.

CHE 4403. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN

Cat. I Design of equipment, systems and plants; discussion of factors important in chemical plant design such as: economics, cost estimation, profitability, process selection, materials of construction, process control, plant location and safety. Introduction to optimization and computer-aided design. Principles are illustrated with short industrial-type problems. Recommended background: thermodynamics; heat, mass and momentum transfer; inorganic and organic chemistry; chemical kinetics and reactor design.

CHE 4404. CHEMICAL PLANT DESIGN PROJECT

Cat. I Application of Chemical Engineering design principles to the design of a major chemical plant. Students work in groups to produce a preliminary practical process flowsheet, equipment and plant design, and economic analysis. Recommended background: familiarity with techniques and procedures emphasized in CHE 4403.

CHE 4405. CHEMICAL PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL LABORATORY

Cat. I This course is intended to provide laboratory application of fundamental principles of chemical process dynamics and feedback control. This includes open-loop dynamics of typical chemical engineering processes such as distillation, fluid flow, chemical reactors and heated stirred tanks. Closed-loop experiments will involve control loop design, controller tuning, multivariable, and computer control. Students will be required to design and execute their own experiments based on supplied objectives. Analysis and presentation of the results will be done through oral and written reports. Recommended background: knowledge of fluid flow and heat transfer, mathematics and chemical engineering principles.

 
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