Major Qualifying Projects

The Major Qualifying Project (MQP) is a high-level research project in the student's field. Through the MQP every WPI student has the chance to experience the kind of real-world problem solving that will soon characterize their professional careers. With an MQP on their resume, WPI students have a leg up on the competition when it comes to launching careers or gaining admission to the best graduate schools.

The MQP involves problems typical of those found in the student's professional discipline and addresses challenging research issues. These qualifying projects are far from trivial; each requires a substantial part of an academic year.

Get to know some of our students and learn how their MQP experience has direct ties to their success.

 

Project Title

The Way I Breathe: An Actor's Portfolio

Project Authors

  • Anika Jeanette Blodgett, HU

Project Description

This Major Qualifying Project is a portfolio that documents the skills gained by an aspiring actress in pursuit of a bachelor's degree in Humanities & Arts with a concentration in Drama/Theatre from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. This portfolio contains proof of the student's attainment of theatrical knowledge through theory learned in the classroom and through practice gained on the stage. This portfolio further offers reflections on the philosophy and nature of the beautiful art that is acting. Learn more . . .



Project Title

Life in the Ledges: An Environmental History

Project Authors

  • Charles A Mezak, HU

Project Description

This project examines the history of a small lake in southern New York. The lake is the result of a new era of human influence on this land; it is being cultivated now for its ability to appeal to our sense of beauty and to accommodate our recreation. What appears to be unalloyed nature is actually something much more complex as this history explores.

Special attention is paid to how different groups of people, operating in different economic, religious, and social contexts, held differing attitudes toward the land. The uncovered story challenges popular conceptions of what it means for a phenomenon to be natural. Learn more . . .

 
  • Email a Friend
  • Bookmark this Page
  • Share this Page