I Give

1999-2000

Distinguished Instructors Named at Worcester Polytechnic Institute

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE/
Contact: Arlie Corday, WPI Media & Community Relations

WORCESTER, Mass. - Two Worcester Polytechnic Institute professors of mechanical engineering have been honored for the quality of their teaching. Through the recommendation of the Effective Teaching Committee, both have received awards that include a stipend for further professional development.

Robert L. Norton of Norfolk, Mass., has been selected as the recipient of the 2000-2001 Morgon Distinguished Instructorship in Mechanical Engineering. He earned a 1967 B.S. degree from Northeastern University and a 1970 M.S. degree from Tufts University. His research interests focus on linkage design, mechanical design and analysis, dynamic signal analysis, computer-aided design, cam design and machine design.

Norton is the author of "Design of Machinery" (2ed, McGraw-Hill 1999), used in more than 100 schools worldwide and published in four languages, and "Machine Design: An Integrated Approach" (2ed, Prentice Hall 2000), used in more than 70 schools and published in three languages.

Among his honors and awards, he won the 1992 and 1986 Merle Miller Award for Best Journal Article in ASEE CoEd Journal. He was elected a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1997 and has been named to Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, Who's Who in Engineering Education, Who's Who in the World and others. He is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers; Sigma XI, international honor society for scientific and engineering research; the American Society of Engineering Education; and Pi Tau Sigma, the national mechanical engineering honor society.

Hamid Johari of Worcester, Mass., professor of mechanical engineering, has been chosen to receive the 2000-2001 Russell M. Searle Instructorship in Mechanical Engineering.

He earned a 1983 B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and 1984 M.S. and 1989 Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington. His research interests focus on aerodynamics, turbulent mixing and unsteady flows. Among his honors and awards, he was elected to the national engineering honor society Tau Beta Pi in 1983 and the international honor society for scientific and engineering research Sigma Xi in 1991.

Recipient of the Louis and Katherine Marsh Fellowship, University of Washington, from 1983-85, he is a senior member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and served as faculty advisor of the WPI student chapter from 1991-95. He is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, for which he has served as chairperson of the Worcester section, the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Mechanics.

Founded in 1865, WPI enrolls 2,700 undergraduate and 1,000 full- and part-time graduate students in science, engineering, management, the humanities and arts and the social sciences. At WPI, students integrate classroom studies with research projects conducted on campus and around the world.