I Give

2000-2001

New Faculty Join Worcester Polytechnic Institute

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE/Sept. 15, 2000
Contact: WPI Media Relations, 508-831-5616

WORCESTER, Mass. - Worcester Polytechnic Institute, the technological university known for its project-oriented curriculum, welcomes the following new faculty members this fall:

Gretar Tryggvason of Worcester has been selected as professor and new head of the Mechanical Engineering Department. A native of Reykjavik, Iceland, he earned 1985 Ph.D. and 1982 Sc.M. degrees at Brown University's Division of Engineering and a 1980 B.S. degree in mechanical engineering at the University of Iceland. Most recently he has been a visiting scientist at the University of Paris VI in France. He previously served as professor of mechanical engineering and applied sciences at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he also was director of undergraduate studies and associate chairman. Among other professional experiences, he has been associate editor of the Journal of Computational Physics. His awards include the 2000 University of Michigan's College Excellence in Service Award, the 1996 Best Paper Award at the ASEE annual meeting, a National Science Foundation Engineering Initiation Award, a Brown University graduate fellowship and a Fulbright grant.

William J. Martin of Worcester is an associate professor in the Mathematical Sciences Department. He earned a 1992 Ph.D. in combinatorics and optimization from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, a 1986 M.A. with distinction in mathematics and a 1986 B.A. in computer science and mathematics from the State University of New York at Potsdam. Most recently he has been a visiting associate professor at the Centre for Applied Cryptographic Research at the University of Waterloo and an associate professor of mathematics and statistics at the University of Winnipeg. A Fellow of the Institute for Combinatorics and its Applications, from 1986 to 1988 he worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories.

Yong B. Shin of Shrewsbury, Mass., is an assistant professor in the Department of Management. He earned 2000 Ph.D. and 1994 M.S. degrees in management information systems from Mississippi State University and a 1992 B.S. degree in business information systems from Utah State University. Most recently he has been a teaching assistant at MSU and previously was assistant project manager at Xytech Inc. and a research assistant at MSU.

John P. Woycheese of Worcester is an assistant professor in the Fire Protection Engineering Department. He earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering, with an emphasis in thermosciences, from the University of California at Berkeley, where he also received M.S. and B.S. degrees in mechanical engineering. He has been a graduate student researcher in fire safety engineering science at Berkeley. His field experiences include nine years at Gage-Babcock and Associates, where he designed automatic sprinkler and fire alarm systems and performed research in fire safety. He has received several grants, scholarships and awards from the Society of Fire Protection Engineers, of which he is a member.

Donald R. Brown of Lunenburg, Mass., is an assistant professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He has a 2000 Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Cornell University and a 1996 M.S. in electrical engineering and a 1992 B.S. in electrical engineering with summa cum laude distinction from the University of Connecticut, Storrs. While earning the M.S. degree, he was employed full-time at General Electric. He completed a research internship in 1999 with Applied Signal Technology in Sunnyvale, Calif. He has been a guest lecturer in graduate and senior level courses at Cornell as well as a teaching assistant. He was named the 1997 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Cornell Chapter Teaching Assistant of the Year and has been a member of IEEE since 1997.

Kathryn Fisler of Providence, R.I., is an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department. She earned 1996 Ph.D. and 1992 M.S. degrees in computer science from Indiana University and a 1991 B.A. in computer science and Asian studies from Williams College, graduating cum laude with highest honors in computer science. She most recently has been a postdoctoral research associate and lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at Rice University. She has been a consultant and technical staff member in industry including at the Intel Design Center, Lucent Technologies and AT&T Bell Laboratories. She has been awarded a two-year National Science Foundation fellowship in experimental computer science and an AT&T research fellowship, among other honors.

Craig D. Fairchild of Worcester is an assistant professor in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. He earned a 1993 Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California at Berkeley and a 1984 B.S. degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University. He received a post-doctoral fellowship from the Cancer Research Fund of the Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Foundation, among other honors. Most recently he has been a post-doctoral fellow in the Plant and Microbial Biology Department at the University of California at Berkeley and the U.S. Department of Agriculture-ARS Plant Gene Expression Center. He also spent two years as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching math and agricultural science in Sierra Leone.

George D. Pins of Holden, Mass., is an assistant professor in the Biomedical Engineering Department. He earned a 1996 Ph.D. in biomedical engineering at Rutgers University and a 1989 B.S. in applied science at Rutgers College of Engineering. Previously he was a research scientist at Tensegra Inc., a medical device company in Norwood, Mass., and a research fellow at the Shriners Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Terri A. Camesano of Worcester, Mass., has been named an assistant professor in the Chemical Engineering Department. In 2000, she earned a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Pennsylvania State University. She earned an 1997 M.S. degree in environmental engineering from the University of Arizona and 1995 B.S. degrees in chemical engineering and in environmental science from the University of Rochester. In 1999, she performed research at Laboratoire des IMRCP at the Universite Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, France, and in the summer of 2000 she was a postdoctoral assistant at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. She was awarded the 1999-2000 General Electric Foundation Fellowship in Engineering and has received other scholarships and honors for her presentations and publications.

Erwin Danneels, a native of Belgium, and now of Marlboro, Mass., is an assistant professor in the Department of Management. He earned a 1998 Ph.D. in business administration, with a concentration in marketing, from Pennsylvania State University, a 1994 M.S. in textiles from the University of California at Davis and a 1991 M.B.A. and a 1990 B.A. degree in sociology at the University of Ghent, Belgium. He has been a visiting assistant professor of marketing at the Goizueta Business School at Emory University for the past two years. His research focuses on how new product development drives company growth.

Berk Sunar of Shrewsbury is an assistant professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He earned a 1998 Ph.D. from Oregon State University and a 1995 B.S. degree from Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey, both in electrical engineering. He has been a senior cryptographer at the California-based Secured Information Technologies Inc. and has provided security consultation services for companies such as Time Warner EMS and Bank of America. He also has been a member of the research faculty of Information Security Laboratories and a research assistant in the Electronics and Computer Engineering Department, both at Oregon State. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the International Association for Cryptologic Research.

Eleanor T. Loiacono of Natick, Mass., is an assistant professor in the Department of Management. She earned a 2000 Ph.D. in business administration from the Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, a 1996 M.B.A. from the Carroll School of Management at Boston College and a 1992 cum laude B.A. degree in international relations from Boston University. She has been a research and teaching assistant at the University of Georgia for four years and a consultant for the Johnson & Johnson Corp. She has received the 1999 Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award from the University of Georgia and was selected as a runner-up in the George Day Doctoral Research Awards, a national research competition in the fields of marketing and management information systems.

Olga Volkoff of Worcester has joined the faculty of the Department of Management. She is completing her Ph.D. in business administration at the University of Western Ontario (UWO), London, Ontario. She earned a 1973 M.B.A. from UWO, a 1994 master of public administration from Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, and a 1971 B.S. from the Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. She has been a lecturer at the University of Western Ontario and Queen's University and has been a partner and co-owner of a business-consulting firm. She was awarded a 1996-98 doctoral student fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, among other honors.

Edward A. "Ted" Clancy of Framingham, Mass., is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He earned a 1991 Ph.D. and a 1987 M.S. in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a 1983 B.S. degree with high distinction in electrical engineering from WPI. He has most recently been senior engineer of radar systems at Raytheon Co. in Bedford, Mass., and previously conducted scientific research at Liberty Mutual Research Center for Safety and Health, Aspect Medical Systems and Colin Research America. He has served as a research assistant and post-doctoral fellow at MIT, has been a visiting scientist at Centro di Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Torino, Italy, and serves as a professeur associe at Laval University, Quebec. He has been named a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, among other honors.

Founded in 1865, WPI enrolls 2,700 undergraduate and 1,000 graduate students in science, engineering, management, humanities and arts, and social sciences. Under the WPI Plan, undergraduates complete three projects focusing on their major course of study, the humanities, and the interactions among science, technology and society.