I Give

2001-2002

Worcester Polytechnic Institute Commencement Ceremony to be Webcast on May 18

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE/May 16, 2002
Contact: WPI Media Relations, 508-831-5616

WORCESTER, Mass. - May 16, 2002 - Worcester Polytechnic Institute will Webcast its 134th Commencement exercises on Saturday, May 18. To access the Webcast, visit the Commencement Web site. WPI will award honorary doctorates to the developer of the first self-contained artificial heart, a noted author and authority on mathematics and science education, and a veteran of the Manhattan Project who is a pioneer in radiochemistry and the science of complexity.

The university will award 615 bachelor’s degrees, 318 master’s degrees and 25 Ph.D.’s during the ceremony, which begins at 11 a.m. on the Quadrangle (rain location, Harrington Auditorium). Dean Kamen ’73, founder of DEKA Research Corp. and inventor of the IBOT mobility device and the Segway Human Transporter, will deliver the address. Kamen received an honorary doctorate from WPI in 1992.

Honorary degrees will be presented to

George A. Cowan ‘41, senior fellow emeritus of the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Institute Distinguished Fellow of the Santa Fe Institute. His research has established him as one of the world’s leading authorities on nuclear weapons diagnostics and won him numerous awards, including the Enrico Fermi Award, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. Department of Energy.

David M. Lederman, founder, chairman, president and CEO of ABIOMED Inc. in Danvers, Mass., developer of the AbioCor, the first self-contained, implantable artificial heart, which is currently undergoing FDA-approved clinical trials.

Sheila Tobias, a leading authority and author on mathematics and science education. The author of Overcoming Math Anxiety, the best-selling 1978 book (recently released in an updated edition) and 10 other influential volumes, Tobias has spent much of her career exposing biases in the way math and science are taught that often discourage talented individuals from pursuing studies in these fields, to their detriment, and to society’s.