Courses

BB 125X. HUMAN BIOLOGY

BB 205X. ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

BB 290X. MICROBES TO MOLECULES: CROWD SOURCING NOVEL ANTIBIOTIC DISCOVERY

Using an authentic research project, students will gain skill in the process of scientific inquiry, including hypothesis generation and testing, and in common procedures of microbial culture and characterization. Students enrolled in the course will be part of a national student crowd sourcing initiative to identify novel antibiotics produced by soil bacteria in response to a decreasing supply of effective antibiotics and increased microbial resistance. Students will report their findings in a poster style format and will be able to see the results of other groups around the country as the course continues. Students may not receive credit for both BB 2901 and BB 290X. Recommended background: A familiarity with current topics in biotechnology or microbiology such as those introduced in BB 1035 and BB 2002, or equivalent.

BB 301X. SIMULATION IN BIOLOGY

In this course, students will use the graphical programming language StarLogo The Next Generation (SLTNG) to develop their own agent-based simulations of biological processes. Agents may be chosen to represent molecules, cells, or organisms. Examples might include such phenomena as population genetics, predator-prey dynamics, cell-cell communication, or enzyme-substrate interactions. Recommended background: completion of at least one 3000 or 4000 level biology or biochemistry course. No prior programming experience is required.

BB 1001. INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY

Cat. I This course consists of an overview of the major concepts of Biology, including: cell theory, bioenergetics, molecular biology, reproduction, nutrition, growth, development, homeostatic controls, and ecological issues. This course is intended for students seeking a broad overview of contemporary Biology with emphasis on human issues and current topics. Intended for non-majors. Recommended background: high school or introductory college level chemistry.

BB 1002. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY

Cat. I This course provides an introduction to natural ecosystems, population growth, and the interaction between human populations and our environment. Major areas of discussion include Ecosystems, Populations, Biodiversity, Pollution, and Environmental Economics. This course is designed for students seeking a broad overview of ecological systems and the effect of humans on the ecosystems. Intended for non-majors. Recommended background: High School biology.

BB 1025. HUMAN BIOLOGY

Cat. I This course presents students with an introduction to general concepts of human biology with particular focus on human structure and function. Contemporaneous issues of homeostasis, ergonomics, adaptation and health will be discussed in the context of today?s emerging environmental and interorganism impacts on the quality of life. Scientific background will underscore student opportunities to think critically, from the perspective of the human organism functioning independently, the interface between the individual and his/her immediate environment, including interactive relationships with technology, and global environment. This course is intended for BBT and other life science majors. Recommended background: a solid working knowledge of biological principles.

BB 1035. INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY

Cat. I Current topics and issues in Biotechnology will be investigated. Some examples of topics which may be investigated in detail include: cloning, DNA fingerprinting and molecular forensics, transgenic organisms, ?green? engineering and bioremediation, bioprocess and metabolite engineering, bioinformatics, and mathematical modeling of biological systems. This course is intended for BBT and other life science majors. Recommended background: a solid working knowledge of biological principles.

BB 1045. BIODIVERSITY

Cat. I This course is an integrated survey of the five kingdoms which stresses general concepts and economically important species. Particular attention will be paid to special structures and mechanisms evolved by selected representatives of major phyla of plants and animals for solving problems of life in various environments. This course is intended for BBT and other life science majors. Recommended background: a solid working knowledge of biological principles.

BB 2002. MICROBIOLOGY

Cat. I This course will focus on unicellular organisms with special reference to those of the domain Bacteria, and describe their taxonomy, morphology, and physiology. Special attention will be given to those organisms that are of ecological concern or serve a useful industrial purpose. The importance of microbes and viruses in public health will be presented. This course is designed for all biology majors and other students who seek a good general education in modern biology. Recommended background: BB 1035.

BB 2030. PLANT DIVERSITY

Cat. I An introductory course stressing general concepts related to the vast array of plant species, taxonomic links, and uses of major plant phyla in both society and industry. Some emphasis will be given to economically important species chosen from agronomic and non-agronomic situations. Recommended background: BB 1045. Students may not receive credit for both BB 2030 and BB 1040.

BB 2040. PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY

Cat. I This course is designed to give the student a basis for understanding the abundance and distribution of plants and animals from the level of the individual to that of the ecosystem. Topics may include population ecology, competition, community ecology, patterns of species diversity, and energy flow. Recommended background: BB 1045, and MA 1021-1022.

BB 2050. ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Cat I This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of animal behavior with emphasis on how and why animals behave as they do in the context of their natural environment. The behavior of animals will be analyzed from the perspective of several biological disciplines, including ecology, evolution, psychology and neurobiology. Recent research from the field and the laboratory will be used to illustrate topics such as communication, foraging, navigation, mate choice, predation, and social behavior.

BB 2550. CELL BIOLOGY

Cat. I This entry level course, recommended for all BIO, BC, and pre-professional majors, presents the fundamental aspects of cell structure and function, and is the foundation of all fields of modern biology. Topics include: cell complexity and organizational hierarchy, evolution of the cell, cell surface, plasma membrane, single and double cytoplasmic membrane systems, nuclear fusion and hybridomas, cytoskeleton, cell growth, and differentiation. Recommended background: BB 1035.

BB 2901. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, MICROBIOLOGY, AND GENETICS

Cat. I (1/6 unit) The lab exercises in this course are designed to provide foundation skills needed for the study of living organisms and systems at the both the organismal and molecular scales. Students will gain experience with procedures, equipment, techniques and skills common to all areas of biology. In particular this course will focus on: The use and identification of bacteria in the laboratory Handling- Restriction digestion- and visualization- of DNA Plasmid purification and cloning Examples of classic genetics Recommended background: BB 1035.

BB 2902. ENZYMES, PROTEINS, AND PURIFICATION

Cat. I (1/6 unit) The lab exercises in this course are designed to provide foundation skills needed for the study of living organisms and systems at both the organismal and molecular scales. Students will gain experience with procedures, equipment, techniques and skills common to all areas of biology. In particular this course will focus on: The action and optima of enzyme action Quantification and detection techniques for proteins Extraction and purification of protein from biological material. Recommended background: BB 1035.

BB 2903. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) The lab exercises in this course are designed to provide foundation skills needed for the study of living organisms and systems at the both the organismal and molecular scales. Students will gain experience with procedures, equipment, techniques and skills common to all areas of biology. In particular this course will focus on: Comparative and general anatomy of several organisms Physiology and function of body systems , processes and organs. Recommended background: BB 1025.

BB 2904. ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, AND ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Cat. I (1/6 unit) The lab exercises in this course are designed to provide foundation skills needed for the study of living organisms and systems at the both the organismal and molecular scales. Students will gain experience with procedures, equipment, techniques and skills common to all areas of biology. In particular this course will focus on: Observing, recording, understanding, and analyzing animal behaviors Environmental and Ecological assessment and sampling Observations of population dynamics . Recommended background: BB 1045.

BB 2920. GENETICS

Cat. I This course presents the principles and experimental evidence leading to our understanding of the gene concept and the role of DNA as genetic material. Patterns of inheritance, the relationship between genotype and phenotype, and transmission, coding, and expression of genetic information are considered in a variety of organisms. A quantitative, problem-solving approach and the use of genetic analysis as a tool to study biological phenomena are emphasized throughout the course. The course is designed for all biology and pre-professional majors. Recommended background: BB 1035.

BB 2950. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Cat. I This course will explore the molecular mechanisms by which cells use genetic information to produce RNAs and proteins. Mechanisms and regulation of transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes will be studied with an emphasis on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. The structure, organization, evolution and expression of the eukaryotic genome will be emphasized. Recommended background: BB 1035.

BB 3010. SIMULATION IN BIOLOGY

Computer simulations are becoming increasingly important in understanding and predicting the behavior of a wide variety of biological systems, ranging from metastasis of cancer cells, to spread of disease in an epidemic, to management of natural resources such as fisheries and forests. In this course, students will learn to use a graphical programming language to simulate biological systems. Most of the classroom time will be spent working individually or in groups, first learning the language, and then programming simulation projects. We will also discuss several papers on biological simulations from the primary scientific literature. In constructing and comparing their simulations, students will demonstrate for themselves how relatively simple behavioral rules followed by individual molecules, cells, or organisms can result in complex system behaviors. Recommended background: Students taking this course must have a solid background in a biological area they would like to simulate, at about the depth provided by a BB 3000 level class. No programming experience is assumed.

BB 3040. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND DATA ANALYSIS

This applied course introduces students to the design of experiments and analysis of data. We will cover a number of experimental situations occurring frequently in biology, including testing the fit of data to theoretical distributions, comparisons of groups, and regression analysis. Emphasis will be placed on formulating the hypothesis of interest, designing experiments so that the subsequent analysis will have enough power to test the hypothesis, and choosing the appropriate analysis to perform. We will discuss the importance of pilot studies, and some of the most common errors made in choosing and performing statistical tests. Both parametric and non-parametric tests will be discussed. Students will use computer packages to analyze data from the literature and/or their own experimental data. Recommended background: MA 2610 or MA 2611, and any 3000- or 4000-level BB course. Note: Students who have credit for BB 4040 may not receive credit for BB 3040.

BB 3055. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY

Cat. I This course will focus on the metabolic (enzymatic) pathways by which microorganisms obtain, process, and store substances and energy used for synthesis; and on the synthetic pathways by which these substances and energy are utilized. The occurrence of biological reactions in the light of the particular organism and its environment will be emphasized, as will those organisms and metabolic schemes of current or potential usefulness in bioprocess technology. Recommended background: BB 2002, BB 2550. Students who have taken BB 4050 for credit will not receive credit for BB 3055.

BB 3080. NEUROBIOLOGY

Cat. I An introduction to neurobiology, with emphasis on the cellular and molecular basis of neural development and function. Topics will range from electrical and biochemical signaling between neurons, to higher order functions of the nervous system, such as sensation, movement, and memory. Human neurological diseases and disorders will be discussed. Some guided reading of the primary literature will be included. Recommended background: BB 2550, BB 2920, and BB 3101. Students may not receive credit for both BB 4080 and BB 3080.

BB 3101. HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY: MOVEMENT AND COMMUNICATION

Cat. I The form and function of the systems that are responsible for the support, movement, internal communication, and interaction of the human body with its environment will be presented and discussed: Integumentary, Skeletal, Muscular, Nervous (including the senses), and Endocrine. Recommended background: BB 1025 and BB 2550. Suggested background: Concurrent Laboratory Module: BB 3511. Students who have received credit for BB 2130 may not take BB 3101 for credit.

BB 3102. HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY: TRANSPORT AND MAINTENANCE

Cat. I The form and function of the systems of the human body that provide for the intake, distribution, and processing of nutrients, water, and oxygen, and the systems that safeguard health by elimination of wastes, regulation of metabolism, and surveillance against disease will be presented and discussed. Digestive, Respiratory, Circulatory, Lymphatic, Endocrine, Urinary, and Reproductive. Recommended Background: BB 1025 and BB 2550; CH 1010 and CH 1020. Suggested background: Concurrent Laboratory Module: BB 3514. Students who have received credit for BB 3110 may not take BB 3102 for credit.

BB 3120. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND CELL CULTURE

The relationship of structure and function of multicellular plants will be examined at the biochemical level. Topics include (but are not limited to): water relations, mineral nutrition, intra- and inter-cellular transport, hormones, photosynthesis, in vitro culture of plant cells/tissues/organs, and environmental responses. Recommended background: BB 1045, BB 2550, CH 1020.

BB 3140. EVOLUTION: PATTERN AND PROCESS

We will explore several theoretical constructs of evolutionary processes. Topics will range from microevolutionary patterns to global extinctions and speciation. We will examine the causes of evolutionary trends from the molecular to the group level. Readings from current research into the units and levels of selection will be included. Recommended background: BB 2550, BB 2920, at least one of (BB 1045, BB 2040).

BB 3511. NERVE AND MUSCLE PHYSIOLOGY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) Computer and laboratory studies of nerve and muscle function. Recommended background: BB 2903. Concurrent or prior registration in BB 3101 is recommended.

BB 3512. MOLECULAR GENETICS LAB

Cat. I (1/6 unit) The topic of gene therapy will be used to familiarize the student with computer cloning and manipulations of biological sequence information. Recommended background: BB 2920, BB 2550 and CH 4130.

BB 3513. CELL CULTURE TECHNIQUES FOR ANIMAL CELLS

Cat. I (1/6 unit) Basic laboratory skills in mammalian cell culture to include cell counting, freezing and thawing cell lines, culture of suspension and attached cells. Recommended background: BB 2901, BB 2550 and knowledge of aseptic techniques. Concurrent or prior registration in BB 4008 is recommended.

BB 3514. CIRCULATORY AND RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) Computer and laboratory studies of circulatory and respiratory physiology. Recommended background: BB 2903. Concurrent or prior registration in BB 3102 is recommended.

BB 3516. SEPARATION TECHNIQUES IN BIOTECHNOLOGY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) A laboratory course in chromatographic and electrophoretic separation of proteins; plasmid isolation, restriction digestion and electrophoretic separation of DNA. Recommended background: BB 2902. Concurrent or prior registration in Biochemistry (CH 4110) is recommended.

BB 3517. FERMENTATION

Cat. I (1/6 unit) An introductory laboratory course in basic fermentation techniques. Recommended background: BB 2901, BB 2002, and knowledge of aseptic techniques. Concurrent or prior registration in BB 3055 is suggested.

BB 3518. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) Laboratory investigations of select molecular characteristics of proteins and DNA. Recommended background: BB 2901, BB 2550, and CH 4110. Concurrent, or prior registration in CH 4130 is recommended.

BB 3519. PROTEIN PURIFICATION

Cat. I (1/6 unit) A laboratory course in protein purification techniques. Recommended background: BB 2902, CH 4110.

BB 3520. RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNOLOGY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) A laboratory course in the construction, isolation and mapping of recombinants, and use of the polymerase chain reaction. Recommended background: BB 2901, BB 2550, and CH 4110. Concurrent or prior registration in BB 4955 is recommended.

BB 3521. MICROSCOPY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) A laboratory course in the theory and operation of light and electron microscopes, including specimen preparation, operation of equipment, and microphotography. Recommended background: BB 2901 and BB 2550.

BB 3522. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) This laboratory module will provide the student with the basic theory and practice of transmission electron microscopy. The course will include sample handling and preparation methods, use of the TEM, and photographic recording of observations made with the instrument. Recommended background: BB 2550 and BB 2901 or BB 2903.

BB 3524. BIOINFORMATICS LAB

Cat. I (1/6 unit) Laboratory course investigating some of the basic tools currently available for sequence date mining, comparison of nucleotide and/or protein sequences, and the analysis of nucleotide and protein sequences. Course will be computer based. Recommended background: BB 2920, BB 2901, and CH 4110. Concurrent or prior registration in CH 4130 is recommended. Students who have received credit for BB 324X may not receive credit for BB 3524.

BB 3525. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

Cat. I (1/6 unit) Basic studies in the biochemical and physical systems plants use to sustain life; includes an introduction to plant cell culture techniques. Recommended background: BB 1045 and BB 2903. Concurrent or prior registration in BB 3120 is recommended. Students who have received credit for BB 325X may not receive credit for BB 3525.

BB 3620. DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

This advanced level course provides a detailed survey of the processes of animal development, including fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, and organogenesis. These processes are examined in the context of concepts such as differentiation, determination, induction, intercellular signaling, morphogenesis, and pattern formation. Emphasis is placed on current techniques for studying development, such as genetic analysis of mutations, recombinant DNA technology, molecular probing of gene expression, and gene transfer. The experimental focus is on model organisms such as nematodes, fruit flies, frogs, and mice. Recommended background: BB 2002, BB 2550, BB 2920.

BB 3920. IMMUNOLOGY

Cat. I This is a survey course in immunology which assumes a background in cell biology, genetics and biochemistry. Topics to be covered will include cells of the immune system, antigen/antibody immunochemistry, immunogentics and immune responses. Readings from research literature will be assigned. Recommended background: BB 2550, BB 2920, CH 4110, and CH 4120.

BB 4008. CELL CULTURE THEORY AND APPLICATIONS

Cat. I The use of cultured animal cell systems for research and production will be explored. Concepts, including media design, the effects of extracellular matrices, scaling up of cell cultures, and biochemical and morphologic assessment of cell function, will be discussed as a basis for readings from the literature. Recommended background: BB 2550, BB 2920, CH 4110, and CH 4120. Students who have received credit for BB 4007 may not take BB 4008 for credit.

BB 4010. ADVANCED MOLECULAR GENETICS

Cat. I Topics in molecular genetics are presented using microbial systems as models. The structure, function and synthesis of DNA and the results of mutation, recombination and repair are emphasized. Simple bacteria and their plasmids, transposable elements and phages are discussed as experimental models. Recommended background: BB 2002, BB 2550, BB 2920.

BB 4065. VIROLOGY

Cat. I This advanced-level course uses a seminar format based on research articles to discuss current topics related to the molecular/cell biology of viral structure, function, and evolution. Particular emphasis is placed on pathological mechanisms of various human disorders, especially emerging diseases, and the use of viruses in research. Recommended background: BB 2550.

BB 4150. ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE: PROBLEMS & APPROACHES

This seminar course will examine what is known about ecological responses to both natural and human-mediated environmental changes, and explore approaches for solving ecological problems and increasing environmental sustainability. Areas of focus may include, and are not limited to, conservation genetics, ecological responses to global climate change, sustainable use of living natural resources, and the environmental impacts of agricultural biotechnology. Recommended background: BB 1045, BB2040, ENV1100.

BB 4190. REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION

Cat. I This course will cover the biochemical mechanisms involved in regulation of gene expression, modifications of DNA structures that influence transcription rates, transcriptional regulation by protein binding, post-transcriptional modifications of RNA including splicing and editing, regulation of translation including ribosome binding and initiation of translation, and factors that control the half-lives of both mRNA and protein. During the course, common experimental methods will be explored, including a discussion of the information available from each method. Recommended background CH 4110, CH 4120, CH 4130, BB 4010

BB 4550. ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY

Cat. I This advanced-level course uses a seminar format based on research articles to discuss current topics related to the molecular biology of cellular function. Particular emphasis is placed on biological mechanisms of autoimmune disorders, Alzheimers disease, DNA vaccines, stem cells, animal cloning, neurotropic factors, and gene therapy. Recommended background: BB 2550.

BB 4801. BIOINFORMATICS

This course will provide an overview of bioinformatics, covering a broad selection of the most important techniques used to analyze biological sequence and expression data. Students will acquire a working knowledge of bioinformatics applications through hands-on use of software to ask and answer biological questions. In addition, the course will provide students with an introduction to the theory behind some of the most important algorithms used to analyze sequence data (for example, alignment algorithms and the use of hidden Markov models). Topics covered will include protein and DNA sequence alignments, evolutionary analysis and phylogenetic trees, obtaining protein secondary structure from sequence, and analysis of gene expression including clustering methods. Recommended background: BB 2920, BB 2950, and MA 2610 or 2611.

 
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