Undergraduate Courses

AREN 2002. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I

  • This course offers an introduction to the architectural design process by exploring the relations between materials, structures, spaces, and architectural composition. Studio: The studio design component explores the syntax of architecture, siting, context, and human scale. Students will engage these topics through architectural design studies for a project of limited scope and programmatic complexity. Hand drawing and sketching, modeling and visualization software, orthographic drawings, and physical models are used to explore, develop, and communicate architectural design concepts. Lectures / lab: The lecture/lab component of the course focuses on two-dimensional drawing techniques (including hand drawings and sketching), drawing conventions, and architectural representation techniques. Students are introduced to the fundamental uses of modeling software in engineering and architectural design practice. Advanced topics may include three dimensional modeling rendering, animation, and parametric design. This course uses studio, lecture, and lab based teaching methods Recommended background: None

AREN 2004. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II - LIGHT AND LIGHTING SYSTEMS

  • This course aims to develop an understanding of the role of light and lighting in the perception of architecture and human well-being. Studio: The studio component of the course will explore the interactions between light, materials, spaces, and people. Students will engage these topics through architectural design studies for a project with well- specified lighting and architectural needs. Modeling, visualization and simulation software, orthographic drawings, and physical models are used to explore and analyze architectural design concepts. Lectures: The lecture components of the course focuses on the design of illumination systems in buildings. A general introduction to the visual environment is provided, including subjective and objective scales of measurement, visual perception, photometry, brightness, luminance, illumination, natural and artificial lighting. Other topics include photometric units, light sources, daylight luminaries, lighting quality, light loss factors, average luminance calculations (lumen method), point-by-point calculations, performance impacts, and ethics. Field measurements and computer simulations are used to explore some major aspects of architectural illumination systems. Design problems are solved by considering economic evaluation, energy saving criteria and applicable standards and building codes. Students will be introduced to the use of computer tools for the design, analysis, and visualization of natural and artificial lighting in buildings. This course uses studio and lecture based teaching methods Recommended background: Introductory architectural design (AREN 2002 or equivalent). Students may not receive credit for both AREN 2004 and AREN 3005

AREN 2023. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS

  • Cat. I The objective of this course is to introduce the functional parts and systems that make up a building as well as their interactions in delivering required sustainable performance. It encompasses foundations, structures, building enclosures, heating and air conditioning, electrical, plumbing and fire safety systems as well as concepts of building performance and aspects of pertinent building codes and standards. This course, in addition, incorporates basic principles of building science and green construction.

AREN 2025. BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

  • Cat. I The principles of electrical system design in buildings are introduced in this course. Starting with an overview of electrical fundamentals and related laws, it covers circuit design, power distribution and service equipment, communication systems and special electrical systems that meet the requirements of the national electric code as well as building occupants. Other topics include single-phase and three-phase circuits, electrical and lighting loads, panel-board design, switching, system sizing, grounding, fault calculations, and over-current protection. The design criteria and calculation procedures for developing simple layouts of building electrical systems are illustrated. Work includes study of applicable NFPA 70 (NEC) and related building codes. Recommended background: electricity and magnetism (PH 1120/1121 or equivalent)

AREN 3002. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN III

  • This course aims to further a student’s knowledge of the architectural design process through study of ideas, principles and methods of design and construction. Studio: Architectural concepts are developed with the completion of a project of expanded scope and complexity. The course emphasizes the development of form, space, spatial relationships, materials, context, program, and architectural presentation techniques. Hand drawing and sketching, modeling and visualization software, orthographic drawings, detail drawings, and physical models are used to explore, develop, and communicate architectural design concepts. Lectures: The lecture/lab component of the course focuses on three-dimensional modeling and architectural representation techniques. Students are introduced to advanced modeling software in engineering and architectural design practice. Topics include three dimensional modeling, rendering, animation, and parametric design. This course uses studio, lecture, and lab based teaching methods Recommended background: Intermediate architectural design (AREN 2002 and AREN 2004 or equivalent)

AREN 3003. PRINCIPLES OF HVAC DESIGN FOR BUILDINGS

  • Cat. I The course introduces principles and applications of mechanical systems that are required for environmental comfort, health, and safety of building occupants with a focus on energy efficiency and conservation. Topics include psychometrics, thermal comfort, building heating and cooling loads, fluid flow basics, HVAC components and systems, building envelop heat transfer, and energy requirements. In the course, students develop the ability to design and conduct computational modelling experiments and to analyze and interpret output data for selection between system alternatives in order to optimize energy use. Recommended background: Thermodynamics.

AREN 3005. LIGHTING SYSTEMS

  • Cat. I This course focuses on the design of illumination systems in buildings. It provides a general introduction to the visual environment, including subjective and objective scales of measurement, visual perception, photometry, brightness, luminance, illumination, natural and artificial lighting. Other topics include photometric units, light sources, daylight luminaries, lighting quality, light loss factors, average luminance calculations (lumen method), point-by-point calculations, performance impacts, and ethics. Field measurements and computer simulations are used to explore some major aspects of architectural illumination systems. Design problems are solved by considering economic evaluation, energy saving criteria and applicable standards and building codes. Recommended background: electrical systems (AREN 2025 or equivalent)

AREN 3006. ADVANCED HVAC SYSTEM DESIGN

  • Cat. I Analysis of heating and cooling load requirements, considering building construction type, geometry, infiltration, occupancy effects, and daily load variations. Heating design addresses water heating systems, electrical heating, central heating, heating of low and high-rise buildings, selection of heaters, boilers, pumps, piping design. Cooling design addresses refrigerants, refrigeration cycle, evaporator, compressor, condenser, thermostatic expansion valves, refrigeration system control equipment, motor and motor control equipment, refrigeration accessories, calculation of refrigeration piping and absorption systems. Computer applications for heating and cooling load analysis will be introduced to develop energy saving solutions. Analytical techniques and building codes are discussed through case studies and design projects. Recommended background: AREN 3003, ES 3004.

AREN 3020. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IV - BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION

  • This course aims to develop an understanding of sustainability in architecture and introduces the fundamentals and applications of energy simulation tools. Studio: The studio component of the course will explore the relationships between people, buildings, and the environment. Students will explore the impact of building site and context, orientation, building massing and envelop configuration, occupancy and other factors. Students will engage these topics through architectural design studies and simulations for a project of increased scope and programmatic complexity. Modeling and visualization software, simulation tools, orthographic drawings, and physical models are used to explore and develop architectural design concepts. Lectures: The lecture components of the course focuses on the principles of building energy simulation, with a focus on the practical applications of building energy simulation tools to building design. Topics being covered include various model input parameters such as building geometry, orientation, climate, comfort, zoning, material properties, operation schedules, and HVAC systems. Building energy simulation software is illustrated and applied to the analysis of case studies and/or design projects. Simulation output results are critically analyzed and compared to the results obtained from other building energy calculation methods. This course uses studio and lecture based teaching methods Recommended background: Building Physics and HVAC system design (AREN 3024 and AREN 3003) and Architectural Design (AREN 2002, AREN 2004, and AREN 3002 or equivalent). Students may not receive credit for both AREN 3020 and AREN 3025

AREN 3022. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN V - BUILDING ENVELOPE DESIGN

  • This course aims to develop an understanding of the architectural design development process with special focus on the design and detailing of building envelopes. Studio: Through an iterative process, students will advance the architectural and technical development of an architectural project of increased complexity. Modeling and simulation software, orthographic drawings, detail drawings, and physical models are used to advance the development of architectural design concepts. Lectures: The lecture component of the course covers the basic principles of building envelope design, focusing primarily on functional performance requirements and practical constructability aspects. Various building envelope systems are reviewed, including façade and roofing systems made of masonry, stone, concrete, timber, glass, and various metals. More elaborate building envelope strategies will also be reviewed; such as double skin facades and passive solar design approaches. Students will be introduced to computer tools and other methods for the analysis of heat and moisture transfer within building envelopes and components thereof. This course uses studio and lecture based teaching methods Recommended background: Building Physics and HVAC system design (AREN 3024 and AREN 3003) and Architectural Design (AREN 2002, AREN 2004, and AREN 3002 or equivalent). Students may not receive credit for both AREN 3022 and AREN 3026

AREN 3024. BUILDING PHYSICS

  • Cat. I The course introduces the principles of building physics, as they are applied to various building design situations and performance requirements. Covered topics include heat transfer, moisture control, condensation, cold bridging, external and internal gains, and air flows, as they pertain to building envelopes (external walls, windows and doors, and roofs) and the requirements of environmental comfort of space occupants. Design exercises take into account pertinent building and energy codes as well as comfort standards. The course gives students the tools to integrate engineering science fundamentals and physics principles in developing building design solutions. Thermal measurements in building components are performed. Recommended background: thermodynamics and heat transfer (ES 3001, ES 3003 or equivalent).

AREN 3025. BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION

  • Cat. I The course addresses the basic principles of building energy simulation, with a focus on the practical applications of building energy simulation tools to building design. Topics being covered include various model input parameters such as building geometry, orientation, climate, comfort, zoning, material properties, operation schedules, and HVAC systems. Building energy simulation software packages are illustrated and applied to the analysis of various case studies of buildings. Simulation output results are critically analyzed and compared to the results obtained from other building energy calculation methods. Recommended background: building physics (AREN 3024 or equivalent)

AREN 3026. BUILDING ENVELOPE DESIGN

  • Cat. I The course presents the basic principles of building envelope design, focusing primarily on its functional performance requirements and practical constructability aspects. Various building envelope systems are discussed and analyzed through case studies. Lecture topics include façade and roofing systems made of masonry, stone, concrete, timber, glass, and various metals. In addition, more complex building envelope strategies such as double skin facades, passive solar design, and building automation approaches, are discussed. The course includes design exercises and a case study project. Recommended background: architectural engineering systems and architectural drafting (AREN 2023, AREN 3001 or equivalent)