Undergraduate Courses

AE 2550. ATMOSPHERIC AND SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

Cat I This course introduces the ambient atmospheric and space environments encountered by aerospace vehicles. Topics include: the sun and solar activity; the solar wind; planetary magnetospheres; planetary atmospheres; radiation environments; galactic cosmic rays; meteoroids; and space debris. Recommended background: mechanics (PH1110 / 1111 or equivalent), electromagnetism (PH 1120 / 1121 or equivalent), and ordinary differential equations (MA 2051 or equivalent).

AE 2712. INTRODUCTION TO AEROSPACE STRUCTURES

This course introduces the basic concepts of stress analysis and extensively covers mechanics of aerospace structures under bending loads. Topics include: Three-dimensional stress and strain, stress transformation and Mohr?s circle, basic constitutive relationships, statically determinate and indeterminate one-dimensional problems, thermal stresses, and stress distributions and deflections of structural elements under bending loads. The laboratory component of this course will introduce the students to basic constitutive behavior of isotropic and anisotropic composites materials.

AE 2713. ASTRONAUTICS

Cat. I An introductory course that covers the fundamentals of space flight, spacecraft trajectory analysis and mission design. Topics studied: orbital mechanics; geocentric orbits and trajectories; interplanetary transfers; ambient space environments for geocentric orbits and interplanetary transfers; introduction to spacecraft and mission design. Recommended background: dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

AE 3410. COMPRESSIBLE FLUID DYNAMICS

Cat. I In this course, students are introduced to various compressibility phenomena such as compression (shock) and expansion waves. Conservation laws and thermodynamic principles are applied to the description of flows in which compressibility effects are significant. One-dimensional models are applied to analysis of flow in variable area ducts, normal and oblique shock waves, expansion waves, and flows with friction and heat addition. Numerous applications from engineering are investigated including supersonic inlets, rocket nozzles, supersonic wind tunnels, gas delivery systems, and afterburning jet engines. Recommended background: thermodynamics (ES 3001, CH 3510 or equivalent), fluid dynamics (ES 3004 or equivalent).

AE 3602. INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS

Cat. I This course covers inviscid and viscous incompressible fluid dynamics. Fundamental topics presented include: fluid kinematics and deformation; integral conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy for finite systems and control volumes; differential conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy; the Navier-Stokes equations. Applications will be considered from the following topics: hydrostatics; Bernoulli?s equation; the streamfunction and the velocity potential; incompressible, inviscid, irrotational (potential) flows; incompressible boundary layer flows; viscous incompressible steady internal and external flows; and dimensional analysis. Recommended background: thermodynamics (ES 3001, CH 3510 or equivalent).

AE 3703. INTRODUCTION TO CONTROL OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

Cat. I The course introduces the mathematical modeling and control of dynamical systems found in aerospace and mechanical engineering applications. Topics include: introduction to feedback control analysis and synthesis of linear dynamic systems; transient response analysis of first and second order systems (thermal, pneumatic, hydraulic, and mechanical); introduction to state-space modeling and representation of control systems; linearization of nonlinear systems; stability analysis using Routh?s criterion and Lyapunov methods; system analysis using frequency response methods; introduction to the design of controlers in time and frequency domain. The analysis and design will be accomplished with Matlab/Simulink? software. Recommended background: ordinary differential equations (MA 2051 or equivalent), dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201, PH 2202 or equivalent), fluid dynamics (ES3004, AE/ME 3602 or equivalent), electricity and magnetism (PH 1120 or PH 1121 or equivalent)

AE 3711. AERODYNAMICS

Cat. I This course introduces students to the aerodynamics of airfoils, wings, and aircraft in the subsonic and supersonic regimes. Topics covered include: prediction of aerodynamic forces (lift, drag) and moments, dynamic similarity, experimental techniques in aerodynamics, Kutta-Joukowski theorem, circulation, thin airfoil theory, panel methods, finite wing theory, subsonic compressible flow over airfoils, linearized supersonic flow, and viscous flow over airfoils. Recommended background: incompressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3602 or equivalent).

AE 3712. AEROSPACE STRUCTURES

This course provides an overview of theoretical and practical aspects of mechanics of structures relevant to aerospace applications under different loading conditions. It begins with an overview of energy methods used in mechanics of aerospace structures. Applied topics include general torsion of solid circular and noncircular cross sections, torsion of thin-walled multi-celled members, flexural shear flow in and shear center of thin walled multi-celled members, buckling and stability of columns, and aerospace structures under combined loading. The laboratory component of this course will provide students with testing and measurement experience related to determination of shear center and the behavior of structures undergoing buckling. Recommended background: Introductory level aerospace structures (AE 2712 or equivalent.)

AE 3901. ENGINEERING EXPERIMENTATION

A course designed to develop analytical and experimental skills in modern engineering measurement methods, based on electronic instrumentation and computer-based data acquisition systems. The lectures are concerned with the engineering analysis and design as well as the principles of instrumentation, whereas the laboratory periods afford the student an opportunity to use modern devices in actual experiments. Lecture topics include: review of engineering fundamentals and, among others, discussions of standards, measurement and sensing devices, experiment planning, data acquisition, analysis of experimental data, and report writing. Laboratory experiments address both mechanical and thermal systems and instrumentation in either traditional mechanical engineering (heat transfer, flow measurement/visualization, force/torque/strain measurement, motion/vibration measurement) or materials engineering (temperature and pressure measurements in materials processing, measurement of strain and position in mechanical testing of materials). Each year students will be notified which type of experiments will be used in each term offering. Students may also consult with their academic advisor, the Mechanical Engineering Department Office or the Aerospace Engineering Program Office. Recommended background: mathematics (MA 2051), thermo-fluids (ES 3001, ES 3003, ES 3004 or equivalent), mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503 or equivalent), materials (ES 2001 or equivalent).

AE 4710. GAS TURBINES FOR PROPULSION AND POWER GENERATION

Cat. I This course provides a study of open-cycle and closed-cycle gas turbines. Topics covered include: thermodynamic cycles and fluid dynamics of airbreathing gas turbines (turbojets, turbofans, turboprops), ramjets, and scramjets; thermodynamic cycles and fluid dynamics of closed-cycle gas turbines. Performance of specific engine components such as inlets, combustors, nozzles, as well as axial compressors and turbines will be addressed. Recommended background: compressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3410 or equivalent).

AE 4712. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

Cat. I This course introduces the analysis of vibrations of flexible bodies encountered as elements of aircraft and space structures. Topics include: modal analysis for determining structural response to forced vibrations; vibrations of strings and rods; free and forced vibrations of beams and plates. Recommended background: ordinary differential equations (MA 2051 or equivalent), dynamics (ES2503, PH 2201, PH2202 or equivalent), aerospace structures (AE/ME 3712 or equivalent).

AE 4713. SPACECRAFT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

Cat. I The course covers broad topics in spacecraft attitude dynamics, stability and control. The course includes a review of particle and two-body dynamics and introduction to rigid body dynamics. Orbital and attitude maneuvers are presented. Attitude control devices and momentum exchange techniques such as spinners, dual spinners, gravity gradient, and geomagnetic torques are presented. Attitude sensors/actuators are presented and the attitude control problem is introduced. Gyroscopic instruments are introduced and demonstrated in the laboratory. Open-loop stability analysis for a variety of equilibrium conditions is discussed. Control using momentum exchange and mass expulsion (thrusters) devices is discussed. Recommended background: astronautics (ME 2713 or equivalent), dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

AE 4717. FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

This course provides an overview of the processing techniques and mechanical behavior of composite materials relevant to aerospace applications. Topics in this course may include: classification of composites; elasticity of composite materials; the effect of reinforcements on strength and toughness; bonding mechanisms of interfaces in composite; fabrication methods for polymer-matrix composite materials; viscoelasticity and creep of composites; advanced composites materials (bio-composites, nano-composites). Recommended background: Introductory level material science (ES 2001) and introductory level stress analysis (AE 2712, ES 2502 or equivalent).

AE 4718. ADVANCED MATERIALS WITH AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS

Cat. I This course covers topics on the design, fabrication and behavior of advanced materials used in structural and propulsion components of aerospace vehicles. The design, fabrication, and properties of polymer, metal and ceramic matrix composites used in aerospace structures are presented. The fabrication and behavior of aluminum and titanium alloys used in propulsion components as well as the processing and performance of Nickel-based superalloys are also presented. The fundamentals of coatings for high temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and thermal protection are introduced. Recommended background: Introduction to Materials Science (ES 2001), Stress Analysis (ES 2502 or equivalent).

AE 4719. ROCKET PROPULSION

Cat. I This course provides a study of rocket propulsion systems for launch vehicles and spacecraft. Dynamics, performance and optimization of rocket-propelled vehicles are presented. Performance and component analysis of chemical and electric propulsion systems are covered including thermochemistry of bipropellant and monopropellant thrusters. Additional topics may include advanced propulsion concepts and propellant storage and feed systems. Recommended background: compressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3410 or equivalent).

AE 4723. AIRECRAFT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

The goal of this course is for students to develop, analyze, and utilize models of aircraft dynamics, and to study various aircraft control systems. Topics include: review of linear systems, longitudinal and lateral flight dynamics, simulation methodologies, natural modes of motion, static and dynamic aircraft stability, and aircraft control systems (such as autopilot design, flight path control, and automatic landing). Other topics may include: vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) vehicles and rotorcraft. Recommended background: dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

AE 4733. GUIDANCE, NAVIGATION AND COMMUNICATION

Cat. I This course broadly covers methods and current enabling technologies in the analysis, synthesis and practice of aerospace guidance, navigation, and communication and information systems. Topics covered include: position fixing and celestial navigation with redundant measurements, recursive navigation, and Kalman filtering; inertial navigation systems, global position systems, and Doppler navigation; orbit determination; atmospheric re-entry; communication architectures, data rates, and communication link design; tropospheric and ionospheric effects on radio-wave propagation; pursuit guidance and ballistic flight. Recommended background: Controls (AE/ME 3703, ES 3011 or equivalent).

AE 4770. AIRCRAFT DESIGN

This course introduces students to design of aircraft systems. Students complete a conceptual design of an aircraft in a term-long project. Students are exposed to the aircraft design process, and must establish design specifications, develop and analyze alternative designs, and optimize their designs to meet mission requirements. Students work together in teams to apply material learned in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials, propulsion, stability and control, and flight mechanics and maneuvers to the preliminary design of an aircraft. The project requirements are selected to reflect real-life aircraft mission requirements, and teams are required to design systems which incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. The teams present their design in a final report and oral presentation. Recommended background: fluid dynamics (ME 3410, ME 3602 or equivalent), subsonic aerodynamics (ME 3711 or equivalent), aerospace structures (AE 3712 or equivalent), airbreathing propulsion (AE 4710 or equivalent), aircraft dynamics and control (AE 4723 or equivalent).

AE 4771. SPACECRAFT AND MISSION DESIGN

Cat. I This course introduces students to design of spacecraft and missions. Students are introduced to the process of designing a spacecraft and major subsystems to meet a specific set of objectives or needs. In addition, students will learn about different spacecraft subsystems and what factors drive their design. Particular emphasis is given to propulsion, power, attitude control, structural and thermal control subsystems. Students work together in teams to apply material learned in the areas of orbital mechanics, space environments, attitude determination and control, space structures, and propulsion to the preliminary design of a spacecraft and mission. The project requirements are selected to reflect real-life missions, and teams are required to design systems which incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. The teams present their design in a final report and oral presentation. Recommended background: astronautics (AE 2713 or equivalent), rocket propulsion (AE 4719 or equivalent), spacecraft dynamics and control (AE 4713 or equivalent).

Graduate Courses

AE 591. GRADUATE SEMINAR

Seminars on current issues related to various areas of aerospace engineering are presented by authorities in their fields. All full-time aerospace engineering students are required to register and attend.

AE 593. SP TOP: COMBUSTION

Arranged by individual faculty with special expertise, these courses survey fundamentals in areas that are not covered by the regular aerospace engineering course offerings. Exact course descriptions are disseminated by the Aerospace Engineering Program well in advance of the offering. (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.)

AE 693. ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS

Arranged by individual faculty with special expertise, these courses cover advanced topics that are not covered by the regular aerospace engineering course offerings. Exact course descriptions are disseminated by the Aerospace Engineering Program well in advance of the offering. (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.)

AE 5091. GRADUATE SEMINAR

Seminars on current issues related to various areas of aerospace engineering are presented by authorities in their fields. All full-time aerospace engineering students are required to register and attend.

AE 5101. FLUID DYNAMICS

This course presents the following fundamental topics in fluid dynamics: concept of continuum in fluids; kinematics and deformation for Newtonian fluids; the mass conservation equation for material volumes and control volumes; the differential form of mass conservation, momentum and energy equations. This course covers applied topics chosen from: unidirectional steady incompressible viscous flows; unidirectional transient incompressible viscous flows; lubrication flows similarity and dimensional analysis. This is an introductory graduate-level course and may be taken independent of AE 5107/ME 5107.

AE 5102. ADVANCED GAS DYNAMICS

(2 credits) An introduction to kinetic theory of gases and its application to equilibrium flows and flows with chemical, vibrational and translational nonequilibrium. Topics in kinetic theory also include the Boltzmann Equation and its relation to the continuum equations of gas dynamics. A major focus of the course is exploring how results for equilibrium flow of a perfect gas (e.g. flows in nozzles, normal and oblique shocks, expansion waves) are modified for an imperfect gas with nonequilibrium. The models of flow with nonequilibrium are then applied to the study of different flows of engineering interest including hypersonic flows (e.g. re-entry vehicles), propagating shock waves (explosions), and chemically reacting flows. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593G) version of the same course or ME 512.

AE 5103. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

Computational methods for incompressible and compressible viscous flows. Navier Stokes equations in general coordinates and grid generation techniques. Finite volume techniques including discretization, stability analysis, artificial viscosity, explicit and implicit methods, flux-vector splitting, Monotonic advection schemes and multigrid methods. Parallel computing. (Prerequisite: Fluid dynamics and introductory course in numerical methods.) Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593P) version of the same course or ME612.

AE 5104. TURBOMACHINERY

(2 Credits) This course is an introduction to the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of turbomachinery for propulsion and power generation applications. Axial and centrifugal compressors will be discussed as well as axial and radial flow turbines. Analysis of the mean line flow in compressor and turbine blade rows and stages will be discussed. The blade-to-blade flow model will be presented and axisymmetric flow theory introduced. Three-dimensional flow, i.e. secondary flows, will also be discussed. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593H) version of the same course.

AE 5105. RENEWABLE ENERGY

(2 Credits) The course provides an introduction to renewable energy, outlining the challenges in meeting the energy needs of humanity and exploring possible solutions in some detail. Specific topics include: use of energy and the correlation of energy use with the prosperity of nations; historical energy usage and future energy needs; engineering economics; electricity generation from the wind; wave/ocean energy, geo- thermal and solar-thermal energy; overview of fuel cells, biofuels, nuclear energy, and solar- photovoltaic systems and their role and prospects; distribution of energy and the energy infrastructure; energy for transportation; energy storage. Prerequisites; ES3001, ES3004 or equivalents. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593R) version of the same course.

AE 5106. AIR BREATHING PROPULSION

This course covers at the introductory graduate level the design and performance of air-breathing propulsion engines. Topics covered will be chosen from: jet propulsion theory, gas turbine, ramjet, scramjet, gas dynamics of inlet and nozzle flows, component matching, thermodynamic cycle analysis of the propulsion systems, and combustion control in propulsion systems.

AE 5107. APPLIED FLUID DYNAMICS

This course presents applications of incompressible and compressible fluid dynamics at an introductory graduate level. Topics are chosen from: potential flows; boundary layers; vorticity dynamics and rotating flows; aerodynamics; introduction to turbulence; micro/nano flows. This course can be taken independent of AE 5101/ME 5101.

AE 5110. INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA DYNAMICS

(2 Credits) The course introduces concepts of partially ionized gases (plasmas) and their role in a wide range of science and engineering fields. Fundamental theory includes topics in: equilibrium of ionized gases and kinetic theory; motion of charged particles in electromagnetic fields; elastic and inelastic collisions, cross sections and transport processes; fluid theory and magnetohydrodynamic models; sheaths. Applications cover areas such as plasma diagnostics, plasma discharges, acecraft/environment interactions, and plasma-aided material processing.

AE 5111. SPACECRAFT PROPULSION

(2 Credits) This course provides students with the background and theory needed to evaluate the performance of the most commonly used electric and chemical spacecraft propulsion systems. Electrostatic ion and Hall thruster theory, design, and operation are covered including theory and operation of hollow cathodes, plasma generation and ion acceleration (including design of ion optics), magnetic field design, and beam neutralization. Topics in chemical propulsion include bipropellant and monopropellant chemistry (adiabatic flame temperature and ideal performance) with a focus on catalyst-bed and nozzle design considerations. Discussion of each class of thruster will be supplemented with specific examples of flight hardware.

AE 5200. MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

(2 Credits) The course provides fundamentals for vibration analysis of linear discrete and continuous dynamic systems, A vibrating system is first modeled mathematically as an initial value problem (IVP) or a boundary-initial value problem (BIVP) by the Newton-D'Alembert method and/or the Lagrange energy approach and then solved for various types of system. Explicit solutions for dynamic response of a linear single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system, both damped and undamped, is derived for free-vibration caused by the initial conditions and forced vibration caused by different excitations. Modal analysis is presented to solve for vibration response of both multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems and continuous systems with distributed parameters. As the basis of modal analysis, the natural frequencies and vibration modes of a linear dynamic system are obtained in advance by solving an associated generalized eigenvalue problem and the orthogonal properties of the vibration modes with respect to the stiffness and mass matrices are strictly proved. Computational methods for vibration analysis are introduced. Applications include but are not limited to cushion design of falling packages, vehicles traveling on a rough surface, multi-story building subjected to seismic and wind loading, and vibration analysis of bridges subjected to traffic loading. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593V) version of the same course or ME522.

AE 5202. ADVANCED DYNAMICS

(2 credits) Basic concepts and general principles of classical kinematics and dynamics of particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies are presented with application to engineering problems with complicated three- dimensional kinematics and dynamics. Derivation of the governing equations of motion using Principle of Virtual Work and Lagrange equations is described together with the direct Newton approach. Applications include: swings-effect and its use in engineering, illustrating in particular limit cycles and their stability and reversed-swings control of vibrations of pendulum; various examples of gyroscopic effects; and especially introductory rotordynamics including transverse vibrations (whirling) and potential instability of rotating shafts. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593D) version of the same course or ME 527.

AE 5220. CONTROL OF LINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

(2 Credits) This course covers analysis and synthesis of control laws for linear dynamical systems. Fundamental concepts including canonical representations, the state transition matrix, and the properties of controllability and observability will be discussed. The existence and synthesis of stabilizing feedback control laws using pole placement and linear quadratic optimal control will be discussed. The design of Luenberger observers and Kalman filters will be introduced. Examples pertaining to aerospace engineering, such as stability analysis and augmentation of longitudinal and lateral aircraft dynamics, will be considered. Assignments and term project (if any) will focus on the design, analysis, and implementation of linear control for current engineering problems. The use of Matlab/Simulink for analysis and design will be emphasized. Recommended background: Familiarity with ordinary differential equations,introductory control theory, fundamentals of linear algebra, and the analysis of signals and systems is recommended. Familiarity with Matlab? is strongly recommended. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME 523.

AE 5221. CONTROL OF NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

(2 Credits) Overview of stability concepts and examination of various methods for assessing stability such as linearization and Lyapunov methods. Introduction to various design methods based on linearization, sliding modes, adaptive control, and feedback linearization. Demonstration and performance analysis on engineering systems such as flexible robotic manipulators, mobile robots, spacecraft attitude control and aircraft control systems. Control synthesis and analysis is performed using Matlab/Simulink. Prerequisites: Familiarity with ordinary differential equations, introductory control theory at the undergraduate level, fundamentals of linear algebra. Familiarity with Matlab is strongly recommended. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME 623.

AE 5222. OPTIMAL CONTROL OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

(2 Credits) This course covers the synthesis of optimal control laws for linear and nonlinear dynamical systems. Necessary conditions for optimal control based on the Pontryagin Minimum Principle will be introduced, and cases of fixed and free terminal time and boundary conditions will be discussed. Feedback optimal control will be discussed, and the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation will be introduced. The special case of linear quadratic optimal control will be discussed. Examples throughout the course will be based on air-and-space vehicle applications, such as flight trajectory optimization. Assignments and term project (if any) will introduce basic numerical techniques, and introduce software packages for optimal control. Prequisites: Fluency with the theory of linear dynamical systems and control is required. Familiarity with MATLAB. Familiarity with air-and-space vehicledynamics is beneficial, but not necessary.

AE 5223. SPACE VEHICLE DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

(2 Credits) Overview of spacecraft rotational motion. Stability analysis of forced and torque-free spacecraft motion. Effects of space environment and man-made torques on motion stability. Examination of orbital and attitude motion coupling. Theoretical formulation of spacecraft formation flying. Review of current trends in networked miniaturized spacecraft. Overview and sizing of actuating devices such as gas jet, electric thrusters, momentum wheels and magnetic torquers. Overview and selection of sensing devices such as sun sensors, magnetometers, GPS, IMUs. Formulation of spacecraft maneuvers as control design problems. Case studies on feedback attitude regulators and algorithms for linear and nonlinear attitude tracking. Design and realization of attitude control schemes using Matlab/Simulink. Prerequisites: Fundamentals of spacecraft orbital motion and attitude dynamics at the undergraduate level. Familiarity with state space and frequency domain control concepts such as stability, controllability and observability. Familiarity with Lyapunov-based stability analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems. Familiarity with Matlab.

AE 5224. AIR VEHICLE DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

(2 Credits) This course covers the fundamentals of the dynamics of rigid bodies and their motion under the influence of aerodynamic and gravitational forces. General equations of aircraft motion will be developed, followed by concepts of static and dynamic stability. Trim and linearization will be discussed, and the stability analysis of lateral and longitudinal modes in the linearized equations will be introduced. Stability augmentation via feedback control will be discussed. Aspects of aircraft navigation, guidance, and flight trajectory optimization will also be introduced. Prerequisites: Familiarity with the kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies is required. Familiarity with ordinary differential equations is recommended. Familiarity with aircraft dynamics and control at the undergraduate level is beneficial, but not necessary.

AE 5380. FOUNDATIONS OF ELASTICITY

(2 credits) This course is suitable as an introductory graduate level course. Topics will be chosen from the following: three-dimensional states of stress; measures of strain; thick-walled cylinders, disks and spheres; plane stress and plane strain; thermoelasticity; Airy stress function; energy methods, and exact theory for torsion of non-circular cross sections. This course may be taken independent of ME 5302. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME 531.

AE 5381. APPLIED ELASTICITY

(2 credits) This course is suitable as an introductory graduate level course. Topics covered will be chosen from the following: bending and shear stresses in unsymmetric beams; bending of composite beams; bending of curved beams; torsion of thin-walled noncircular cross sections; beams on elastic foundations; stress concentrations; failure criteria; stability of columns; and bending of plates. This course may be taken independent of ME 5301. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course or ME531.

AE 5382. AEROELASTICITY

(2 Credits) Aeroelastic phenomena arise from the interaction between a fluid and a structure. Such phenomena are encountered in aerospace, mechanical and civil engineering systems. Topics covered include: aeroelastic phenomena in nature, divergence and control effectiveness in static conditions, static and dynamic instabilities of elastic bodies in a flow, flutter of wings, and aeroelastic testing techniques. Students will be introduced to analytical and computational techniques used to model and simulate aeroelasticity. Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have taken the Special Topics (ME 593N) version of the same course.

AE 5383. COMPOSITE MATERIALS

This course covers the anisotropic constitutive behavior and micromechanics of composite materials, and the mechanics of composite structures at an introductory graduate level. Topics covered will be chosen from: classification of composites (reinforcements and matrices), anisotropic elasticity, composite micromechanics, effect of reinforcement on toughness and strength of composites, laminate theory, statics and buckling of laminated beams and plates, statics of laminated shells, residual stresses and thermal effects in laminates.

AE 6093. ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS

Arranged by individual faculty with special expertise, these courses cover advanced topics that are not covered by the regular aerospace engineering course offerings. Exact course descriptions are disseminated by the Aerospace Engineering Program in advance of the offering. (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.)