Undergraduate Courses

ACC 2101. MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

Cat. II This course is intended to familiarize the student with the wide variety of ways in which accounting data are used by management as a tool for the attainment of predetermined organizational objectives. The emphasis of the course is on the application of accounting data, rather than on its preparation, and particular attention is given to the use of financial data both in controlling day-to-day activities and planning future operations. Principal topics include: master budgets, cost analysis and classification systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, standard cost accounting and an introduction to capital budgeting. Recommended background: BUS 2060. This course will be offered in 2014-15 and in alternating years thereafter.

ACC 4200. MANAGING PERFORMANCE: INTERNAL AND INTERORGANIZATIONAL PERSPECTIVES

Cat. II Managing supply chains is recognized as a critical factor for success among many firms, and may be a source of competitive advantage. This course will adopt a management accounting perspective to help managers plan, analyze, and manage the performance of their firm and their supply chain. Three types of topics will be presented: theoretical perspectives, such as transaction cost economics, agency, and goal setting theories; performance measurement, such as financial and non-financial performance measures of the firm and its suppliers; and performance management and challenges, such as strategic cost management, incentives, and total cost of ownership. Recommended background: BUS 2060.

BUS 1010. LEADERSHIP PRACTICE

Cat. I Leadership is a critical role in any global, technological organization.? This course explores how the concepts of creativity, entrepreneurial and critical thinking, emotional and self-awareness, passion, diversity, communication, and ethics inform and affect leadership practice.? The course considers a variety of contemporary leadership challenges including how leaders work effectively across cultural, technological, and disciplinary boundaries, how leaders foster new ideas and bring them to fruition, how they communicate effectively and persuasively to diverse stakeholders, and how they make decisions that are both ethical and effective. The course is designed to 1) increase students? awareness of their own leadership styles, 2) examine the responsibilities of leadership, and 3) determine best practices in leadership.

BUS 1020. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS DECISIONS

Cat. I The global nature of business is indisputable. This course introduces the students to the complexity of the global environment and adopts a multi-dimensional view (cultural, economic, social, legal, political, and technological) of world economy. It promotes understanding the global environment as integrative forces affecting the success or failure of today?s businesses and fosters a global perspective. Topics may include an overview of the world economy, comparative advantage and international trade, cultural distance, FDI/ globalization theory, outsourcing and global supply chain coordination, political and country risk, the global monetary system and currency risk, legal and ethical issues, and risk management.

BUS 2020. THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS DECISIONS

Cat. I This course addresses the impact of law on business. The course covers fundamental areas of business law, such as torts, contracts, intellectual property, and legal forms of business organizations, and their effects on business decisions. Particular attention is paid to technology-based enterprises where global business issues intersect with law.

BUS 2060. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR DECISION MAKING

Cat. I This course provides students with an understanding of the primary financial statements used for internal and external business decision-making in start-up firms and large corporations. It emphasizes underlying accounting concepts captured in financial statements, while highlighting the interdependence among these statements. The course will cover analytical techniques, such as ratio analyses and sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of changes in strategy and outcomes on efficiency and effectiveness measures. It also describes the various users of internal and external financial statements, and the potential conflicts between these various stakeholders.

BUS 2070. RISK ANALYSIS FOR DECISION MAKING

Cat. I Financial and operational risks are omnipresent in small entrepreneurial enterprises and in the corporate world. All firms, large and small, must be able to manage risk to create value. This course introduces students to enterprise risk and prepares them to act in the presence of risk. The course will sensitize students to two significant types of risk (namely, financial and operational risk), provide students with tools for assessing risk and minimizing risk exposure, and prepare students to take risk into account when making decisions as leaders, managers, and individuals.

BUS 2080. DATA ANALYSIS FOR DECISION MAKING

Cat. I This course explores the use of data mining and analytics to create business intelligence and use it for improving internal operations and understanding customers and supply chains. It provides an introduction to the concepts and methods of data analysis for decision-making. Students will learn a comprehensive set of spreadsheet skills and tools, including how to design, build, test, and use spreadsheets for business analyses. Students will also develop an understanding of the uses of business data analyses for decision-making, forecasting, and obtaining and maintaining a competitive advantage. Industrial Engineering majors may not receive credit for both BUS 2080 and MA 2210.

BUS 3010. CREATING VALUE THROUGH INNOVATION

Cat. I This course focuses on the ways value can be created and captured through innovation. Focusing on the assessment of customers, organizational capabilities, and competition, students will consider a variety of different types of innovations and their associated ethical and financial value propositions. Students will learn analytic tools to successfully assess and commercialize technology, product, and service innovations in a variety of contexts.

BUS 3020. ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE OPERATIONS

Cat. I Operations are embedded in a constantly changing network of relationships with various stakeholders including customers and suppliers. Within the organization, scarce resources (including financial, human, and technological) need to be ethically allocated and aligned with strategic goals. This course focuses on process analysis, design, and implementation within the constraints of stakeholder networks and available resources.

BUS 4030. ACHIEVING STRATEGIC EFFECTIVENESS

Cat. I Every successful business has a strategy for how it provides value and earns profit within its particular industry. Focusing on the contexts of technology, innovation and entrepreneurship, this course develops analytic approaches for assessing the various aspects of strategy such as the competitive environment, the network of stakeholders, ethical implications, investor motivation, operational execution, and financial projections that are necessary to create a complete business plan. This class is optimally taken while the MQP is in progress.

BUS 4300. SENIOR SEMINAR

Cat. I This course is designed for the senior student who wishes to acquire or strengthen important skills needed for organizational success. Among the subjects covered is power in organizations, what it is, and how to acquire and appropriately use it. Additionally, this course emphasizes presentation skills, organizational etiquette, cross-cultural communication, and the knowledge of current events. The student will be expected to be familiar with and use all forms of media information for both individual and group projects. The course may be counted as a 4000-level elective for MG, MGE, or MIS, or as a Free Elective for any student at WPI. Recommended Background: Senior standing.

Graduate Courses

ACC 500. ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE FUNDAMENTALS (1 credit)

This course serves as a foundational introduction to financial accounting and financial analysis. It is designed to help students master the technical skills needed in a graduate management curriculum and in business to analyze financial statements and disclosures for use in financial analysis. Students will learn how to read and interpret the three most common financial statements: the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. Students will also learn how to apply ratios that capture key elements of a firm's performance. Students will also develop an understanding of certain essential concepts in mathematical financial analysis, including net present value(NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), payback, future value, and bond and options pricing. (Students cannot get credit for both ACC 500 and ACC 503.)

ACC 502. FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE AND STRATEGIC DECISION MAKING (2 credits)

This course builds on students' knowledge of financial statements and takes a managerial accounting approach to present how firms plan and implement strategy.Accounting, economics, and psychology theories provide the framework for cost analysis, strategic decision-making, and planning under uncertainty. Management control systems will guide students to work with uncertainty. The course will emphasize cost behaviors, setting and meeting cost targets, assessing strategic initiatives, forecasting and budgeting, and the use of assumptions in the calculations of significant revenue and expense projections. Students will apply theories and best practices through simulations and case analyses. (Prerequisite: ACC 500) (Students cannot get credit for ACC 502 and ACC 503)

ACC 505. PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT AND MANAGEMENT (1 credit)

This course strengthens students' understanding of strategic finance/Financial Information & Management in order to monitor and revise strategy. It takes a managerial accounting approach to enable managers to measure and manage firm financial and non-financial performance. Accounting, economics, and psychology theories provide the framework for understanding moral hazard, motivation, and aligning the interest of employees with the interest of the firm. The course will emphasize designing and applying management control systems tools such as the balanced scorecard and examine how choices of what to measure affect behaviors and outcomes. Students will apply theories and best practices through simulations and case analyses. (Prerequisites: ACC 500, ACC 502, FIN 503 & FIN 504) 

BUS 500. BUSINESS LAW, ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

This course combines analysis of the structure, function and development of the law most important to the conduct of business with an examination of the ethical and social context in which managers make decisions. Emphasizing the social responsibility considerations of all business stakeholders, the course focuses on practical applications via extensive use of case studies. Students will gain a sound understanding of the basic areas of U.S. and international law including: intellectual property law; business formation and organization; international business law; securities regulation; cyber law and e-commerce; antitrust law; employment law and environmental law.

BUS 522. GLOBAL BUSINESS EXPERIENCE

Business is increasingly global. To be successful one must understand the customs and traditions of the regions in which they are operating. This course provides students with insight into different countries and business environments and includes an international trip where students will spend a week to 10 days on the ground in the featured region meeting with business, government and/or academic leaders; touring company sites; and learning about the region. Prior to the trip students will study business history, culture and current topics related to the featured region. Guest speakers will often be incorporated. Following the trip students will typically write reflective paper sand deliver presentations.

BUS 546. MANAGING TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION

This course studies successful innovations and how firms must enhance their ability to develop and introduce new products and processes. The course will discuss a practical model of the dynamics of industrial innovation. Cases and examples will be discussed for products in which cost and product performance are commanding factors. The important interface among R&D/manufacturing/marketing is discussed. International technology transfer and joint venture issues are also considered.

BUS 590. STRATEGY IN TECHNOLOGY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS

This course provides a summary overview of strategic management, with a focus on integrating the core curriculum to develop competitive advantage at the corporate and business unit level. Topics include the role of the CEO in the organization, industry analysis, the use of core competence to drive business development and exit decisions, causes of organizational inertia that cause the loss of competitive advantage, the impact of technology on strategy, the links between strategy and organizational design, and the social responsibility of the firm. The course also serves as the initial phase of BUS 599 (Capstone) and is designed to be taken immediately preceding that class.(Prerequisites: ACC 500, ACC 502, ACC 505, BUS 500, FIN 503, FIN 504, MIS 500, MKT 500, OBC 505, OBC 506 and OIE 501 or equivalent content, or instructor consent) (Students cannot get credit for both BUS 590 and BUS 501.)

BUS 595. The Edge of Technology in STEM Industries

The course explores the state of technology and important technology trends in key industries. Students will conduct in-depth investigation of key issues and decisions faced by technology-intensive organizations in various sectors including health care, medical devices, biotech, IT hardware and software, FinTech, manufacturing and defense. Deans of Arts & Sciences, Business and Engineering as well as high profile guest speakers from industry will be involved in teaching the course.

BUS 598. SP TOP:INTRO TO HEALTH SYSTEMS

The student should have a well-developed proposal before approaching a faculty member about an independent study.

BUS 598. ST:INTRO SUSTAINABILITY MGMT

The student should have a well-developed proposal before approaching a faculty member about an independent study.

BUS 599. CAPSTONE PROJECT

This capstone course integrates management theory and practice, and incorporates a number of skills and tools acquired in the M.B.A. curriculum. The medium is a major team-based project in the form of a corporate venture or green field venture. In addition to a written report, the project is formally presented to a panel of outside experts including serial entrepreneurs and investors. (Prerequisites: ACC 500, ACC 502, ACC 505, BUS 500, BUS 590, FIN 503, FIN 504, MIS 500, MKT 500, OBC 505, OBC 506 and OIE 501 or equivalent content, or instructor consent) (Students cannot get credit for both BUS 599 and BUS 517.)

BUS 691. GRADUATE SEMINAR

BUS 698. DIRECTED RESEARCH

For Ph.D. students wishing to gain research experience peripheral to their thesis topics related to their concentration. (Prerequisite: Consent of research advisor)

ETR 500. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION

Entrepreneurship involves many activities, including identifying and exploiting opportunities, creating and launching new ventures, introducing new products and new services to new markets. It is based on implementing innovations within existing organizations and creating new opportunities. This course is intended to introduce students to entrepreneurial thinking and methods of executing their ideas. Topics include recognizing and evaluating opportunities, forming new venture teams, preparing business and technology commercialization plans, obtaining resources, identifying execution action scenarios, and developing exit strategies.

ETR 593. TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION:THEORY, STRATEGY AND PRACTICE

In the modern world of global competition the ability to utilize technological innovation is increasingly important. This course will examine the sources of new technology, the tools to evaluate new technologies, the process of intellectual property transfer, and the eventual positioning of the resultant products and services in the commercial market. Its purpose is to improve the probability of success of this discipline in both existing organizational models and early stage ventures. Specific cases studies of successful technology commercialization processes will be used to supplement the course materials.

ETR 596. SELLING AND SALES

Selling is a major part of our business and professional lives. This is especially important for those who are launching new ventures. Business propositions need to be presented to (and need to be sold to) potential investors, employees, colleagues, and certainly potential employers. Later there is a need to sell products or services to customers. Common to all is a sales process and organization model that can be developed that is focused on meeting customer and other stakeholder needs through effective selling disciplines.

FIN 500. FINANCIAL INFORMATION AND MANAGEMENT

This course develops expertise in financial decision-making by focusing on frequently used financial accounting information and the conceptual framework for managing financial problems. Students are introduced to the accounting and financial concepts, principles and methods for preparing, analyzing and evaluating financial information, for the purpose of managing financial resources of a business enterprise and investment decisions. The course adopts a decision-maker perspective by emphasizing the relations among financial data, their underlying economic events, corporate finance issues, and the responses by market participants.

FIN 503. FINANCIAL DECISION MAKING FOR VALUE CREATION

This course develops and enhances the student's ability to implement and clearly communicate a firm's financial decisions related to value creation. The course covers capital structure optimization, cost of capital, capital allocation and investment strategies, enterprise risk, project and firm valuation, and international financial management. The course adopts a decision-maker's perspective by emphasizing the relationships among a firm's strategic objectives, financial accounting and financial statement data, economic events, responses by market participants and other impacted constituencies, and corporate finance theory. The course also builds on these practical finance skills by incorporating team-based assignments, real-world simulations, and a variety of financial modeling tools. (Students cannot get credit for both FIN 503 and FIN 500.)

FIN 504. FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS AND VALUATION (2 credits)

This course develops expertise in financial decision-making by focusing on financial accounting information. The course presents a comprehensive framework for financial statement analysis and valuation. Through hands-on, practical application of various tools for financial analysis (e.g., ratio analysis & financial modeling using Excel and other resources), students will develop the expertise needed to use a firms' financial statements to draw an understanding of its performance and to provide a basis for making reasonable valuation estimates. Students will learn to apply analytical techniques to develop forecasted financial statements and use the information to value a firm's equity. The course will utilize team assignments, cases, simulations, and other applied exercises. (Prerequisites: ACC 500, ACC 502, & FIN 503)

FIN 598. ST:FINANCIAL INST MKT & TECH

MIS 500. INNOVATING WITH INFORMATION SYSTEMS

This course focuses on information technology and innovation. Topics covered are information technology and organizations, information technology and individuals (privacy, ethics, job security, job changes), information technology and information security, information technology within the organization (technology introduction and implementation), business process engineering and information technology between organizations (electronic data interchange and electronic commerce).This course provides the knowledge and skills to utilize existing and emerging information technology innovatively to create business opportunities.

MIS 571. DATABASE APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT

Business applications are increasingly centered on databases and the delivery of high-quality data throughout the organization. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of computer-based data management. It focuses on the design of database applications that will meet the needs of an organization and its managers. The course also covers data security, data integrity, data quality, and backup and recovery procedures. Students will be exposed to commercially available database management systems, such as MS/Access and Oracle. As a project during the course, students will design and implement a small database that meets the needs of some real-world business data application. The project report will include recommendations for ensuring security, integrity, and quality of the data.

MIS 573. SYSTEM DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

This course introduces students to the concepts and principles of systems analysis and design. It covers all aspects of the systems development life cycle from project identification through project planning and management, requirements identification and specification, process and data modeling, system architecture and security, interface design, and implementation and change management. Object-oriented analysis techniques are introduced. Students will learn to use an upper level CASE (computer-aided software engineering) tool, which will be employed in completing a real-world systems analysis and design project. (Prerequisite: MIS 571 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

MIS 576. PROJECT MANAGEMENT

This course presents the specific concepts, techniques and tools for managing projects effectively. The role of the project manager as team leader is examined, together with important techniques for controlling cost, schedules and performance parameters. Lectures, case studies and projects are combined to develop skills needed by project managers in today?s environment.

MIS 578. TELECOMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT

This course provides students with the technical and managerial background for developing and managing an organization?s telecommunications infrastructure. On the technical side, it covers the fundamentals of data transmission, local area networks, local internetworking and enterprise internetworking, and security. Coverage includes data communications and computer networking; local area communications topics such as cabling, and local area network hardware and software; and topics involved in wide area networking, such as circuit and packet switching, and multiplexing. On the managerial side, this course focuses on understanding the industry players and key organizations, and the telecommunications investment decisions in a business environment. Coverage includes issues in the national and international legal and regulatory environments for telecommunication s services.

MIS 581. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND STRATEGY

Fast-paced changes in technology require successful IS managers to quickly understand, adapt, and apply technology when appropriate. They must recognize the implications new technologies have on their employees and the organization as a whole. In particular, they must appreciate the internal (e.g., political and organizational culture) and external (e.g., laws, global concerns, and cultural issues) environments that these changes occur within and plan accordingly. This course focuses on the core IS capabilities that IS managers must consider when managing technology within their organization: business and IT vision, design of IT architecture, and IT service delivery. This course will build on the knowledge and skills gained from previous MIS courses. (Prerequisite: MIS 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

MIS 582. INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Information Security Management. It is designed to develop in students an understanding of and appreciation for the importance of information security to all enterprises, and to enable current and future managers to understand the important role that they must play in securing the enterprise. This course is appropriate for any student interested in gaining a managerial-level understanding of information security. A combination of readings, lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and discussion of real world events will be used to bridge the gap between theory and practice. The course will primarily explore the Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) of information security, along with other related topics. It will also explore the interaction between People, Process and Technology as the cornerstone of any effective information security program. Upon completion of this course, the student will have an in-depth understanding of the essential components of a comprehensive information security program, as well as an understanding of the technology at work behind the scenes.

MIS 583. USER EXPERIENCE APPLICATIONS

The course provides an introduction to various methods to study user experience, which includes the newest research in user experience theory and practice (e.g., the use of eye tracking in informing the design of webpages). Students will learn how businesses can benefit from user experience research to develop new or improve existing products and services. Both theoretical concepts and practical skills will be addressed within the scope of the class through hands-on projects and assignments. Both theoretical concepts and practical skills will be addressed within the scope of the class through hands-on projects and assignments (Recommended background: ability to program in a higher level programming language)

MIS 584. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE

Today?s business computing infrastructures are producing the large volumes of data organizations need to make better plans and decisions. This course provides an introduction to the technologies and techniques for organizing and analyzing data about business operations in a way that creates business value, and prepares students to be knowledgeable producers and consumers of business intelligence. During the course, students will study a variety of business decisions that can be improved by analyzing large volumes of data about customers, sales, operations, and business performance. Students will apply commercially available business intelligence software to analyze data sets and make recommendations based on the results. The course explores the technical challenges of organizing data for analysis and the managerial challenges of creating and deploying business intelligence expertise in organizations. The course includes business cases, in-class discussion, and hands-on analyses of business data. It is designed for any student interested in analyzing data to support business decision making, including students whose primary focus is IT, Marketing, Operations, or Business Management. (Prerequisite: MIS 571 or CS 542, or equivalent content, or consent of the instructor.)

MIS 585. USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN

Designing positive user experiences is becoming increasingly important in staying competitive in the marketplace. This course covers basic concepts and practical techniques for designing successful digital experiences. These concepts and methods are practiced through hands-on class exercise, assignments, and projects.

MKT 500. MARKETING MANAGEMENT

This course addresses consumer and industrial decision-making, with emphasis on the development of products and services that meet customer needs. Topics covered include management and the development of distinctive competence, segmentation and target marketing, market research, competitor analysis and marketing information systems, product management, promotion, price strategy, and channel management. Students will learn how the elements of marketing strategy are combined in a marketing plan, and the challenges associated with managing products and services over the life cycle, including strategy modification and market exit.

MKT 561. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

This course provides an in-depth analysis of factors that affect purchase decisions and consumption in the marketplace. Topics covered include consumer behavior theory, an examination of attitude formation and value creation, the challenges of consumer protection, market research, and the influence of technology on consumer decision making. Students will learn how the elements of consumer behavior impact marketing strategy and decisions through case analysis and other activities.

MKT 562. MARKETING RESEARCH

This course is designed to equip students with research methods and tools that are used for marketing decision making. Students will learn to conduct, use, apply, interpret, and present marketing research in order to become effective decision makers. The topics covered in this course include problem formulation, research design, data collection methods, and finally presentation of a research plan. This course will be an activity-based course involving design and presentation of a marketing research plan. Basic knowledge of marketing concepts is assumed. (Prerequisite: MKT 500 or equivalent content, or consent of instructor.)

MKT 563. MARKETING OF EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

This course focuses on the new product development process in high-tech corporations, from idea generation through launch. Topics include: understanding customer responses to innovation, engaging customers in the innovation process, developing the marketing mix for new products (product features and benefits, pricing, channel selection, communications), new product introduction timing and competitive positioning. Particular emphasis is placed on how new products can be used to generate firm growth and renewal in a dynamic environment, and on the challenges of incorporating emerging technologies in new products. (Prerequisite: MKT 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

MKT 564. GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY MARKETING

Extending technology to global markets requires an understanding of consumer behavior in different cultures, and effective management of risk and overseas infrastructures. This course addresses the issues associated with technology application in new markets and includes the following topics: consumer behavior differences in international markets and the implications for the marketing mix, cultural differences that affect business practices in new markets, managing exchange rate fluctuation, factors that affect manufacturing and research location, the impact of local government on marketing decision making, and the use of strategic alliances to acquire expertise and manage risk in global market development. Knowledge of marketing management is assumed.

MKT 565. DIGITAL MARKETING

The rapid evolution of technology has led to increasingly well-informed buyers who are connected, communicative, and more in control than ever. This course discusses the theory and practice of digital marketing and its role in building relationships and, ultimately, driving sales. It examines digital technologies and their impact on business models, the marketing mix, branding, communication strategies, and distribution channels. Emphasis is placed on contemporary topics that face today?s marketing managers -- including online lead generation, search, social networking, and ecommerce -- and their application within a comprehensive, integrated digital marketing strategy. The course considers the opportunities and challenges faced in business-to-consumer and business-to-business markets. It covers latest research, current practices, and hands-on project work. (Prerequisite: MKT 500 or equivalent content, or consent of instructor.)

MKT 566. MARKETING AND ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

This course discusses the tools and techniques being used today to harness the vast marketing potential of the Internet. It examines various Web-based business models for effectively and efficiently using the net as a strategic marketing tool for new products, market research, direct and indirect distribution channels, and marketing communications. The course considers both business-to-consumer and business-to-business applications, and explores the major opportunities, limitations and issues of profiting from the Internet.

MKT 567. INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

This course provides students with an understanding of the role of integrated marketing communications in the overall marketing program and its contribution to marketing strategy. The tools of marketing communications include advertising, sales promotion, publicity, personal selling, public relations, trade shows, direct, and online marketing. Understanding the concepts and processes that organizations use in developing effective and synergistic marketing communications is useful for managers across functional disciplines. This course will also consider ethical issues of IMC.

MKT 568. DATA MINING BUSINESS APPLICATIONS

This course provides students with the key concepts and tools to turn raw data into useful business intelligence. A broad spectrum of business situations will be considered for which the tools of classical statistics and modern data mining have proven their usefulness. Problems considered will include such standard marketing research activities as customer segmentation and customer preference as well as more recent issues in credit scoring, churn management and fraud detection. Roughly half the class time will be devoted to discussions on business situations, data mining techniques, their application and their usage. The remaining time will comprise an applications laboratory in which these concepts and techniques are used and interpreted to solve realistic business problems. Some knowledge of basic marketing principles and basic data analysis is assumed.

MKT 569. PRODUCT AND BRAND MANAGEMENT

The conversion of technology into new products requires an understanding of how to develop a meaningful value proposition and integrate the development of a product with a marketing strategy that creates brand equity. This course will focus on the management of products, the implications of other marketing decisions on product and brand management, the management of product lines within the organization, including introduction, growth, and market exit. (Prerequisite: MKT 500 or equivalent content, or consent of instructor.)

MKT 598. SP TOP:PRODUCT & BRAND MANAGE

OBC 505. TEAMING AND ORGANIZING FOR INNOVATION

How do we navigate complex human systems in organizations? How do we foster innovation within organizations? In this course, we explore the paradoxes, opportunities, and hidden systemic challenges that arise on teams and projects, and in working across networks and within innovative organizations. Students will learn to more deftly manage the inherent challenges and opportunities of cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary teams; work through or avoid dysfunctional team and organizational conflicts; wrestle with ambiguity and uncertainty; negotiate change by learning to work with networks of power and influence; and analyze the individual, group, organizational and contextual dynamics that enable and constrain productive and innovative work in organizations. (Students cannot get credit for both OBC 505 and OBC 500.)

OBC 506. THE HEART OF LEADERSHIP: POWER, REFLECTION, AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

All of us hope to have positive, collaborative, and effective interactions with others -in our professional and personal lives. Yet often our interactions do not go as planned and it gets ugly: people behave irrationally and get emotional, communication stops, conflicts fester, and opportunities are left unrealized and obscured. This course develops skills for understanding and acting more powerfully, ethically, and mindfully in our interactions. These include analytic techniques for understanding emotional, biographical, and social-psychological reasons for our own and others behavior, and skills for paying attention to and managing the complex dynamics unfolding in interpersonal interactions. Students will learn to identify and reflect upon their own contributions to problematic interactions; design and execute better ways of interacting with others; and develop their own interpersonal strengths and collaborative capacities. (Prerequisite: OBC 505 or instructor consent.) (Students cannot get credit for both OBC 506 and OBC 501.)

OBC 533. NEGOTIATIONS

This course focuses on improving the student's understanding of the negotiation process and effectiveness as a negotiator. Emphasizes issues related to negotiating within and on behalf of organizations, the role of third parties, the sources of power within negotiation, and the impact of gender, culture and other differences. Conducted in workshop format, combining theory and practice.

OBC 535. MANAGING CREATIVITY IN KNOWLEDGE INTENSIVE ORGANIZATIONS

This course considers creativity in its broadest sense from designing new products and processes to creating our own role and identity as managers and leaders in knowledge-intensive organizations. In this course we will look actively at our own creative process and how we might more fully realize our creative potential. At the same time we will build a conceptual understanding of creating, creativity, and knowledge based in the philosophic, academic, and practitioner literatures. We will critically apply this conceptual understanding to organizational examples of managing creativity in support of practical action.

OBC 536. ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN

A key role for organizational leaders is to design their organization to achieve their desired results. This course applies design thinking and methods to the practical problems of designing various sized organizations for optimal results in a complex environment. This is based on a foundation of organizational theory, design methodology, and organizational strategy. (Prerequisite: OBC 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

OBC 537. LEADING CHANGE

This course focuses on the role of leadership in the design and implementation of organizational change. Topics include visioning, communication, social influence, power, resiliency, and resistance to change. Teaching methods include classroom discussion of readings and cases, simulations, and experiential exercises. (Prerequisite: OBC 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

OIE 501. DESIGNING OPERATIONS FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

The operations function in an organization is focused on the transformation processes used to produce goods or provide services. Operations design is driven by strategic values, and innovative improvements can support sustained competitive advantage. In this course, a variety of analytical and statistical techniques are introduced to develop a deep understanding of process behavior, and to use this analysis to inform process and operational designs. Topics such as process analysis and value stream mapping,postponement and global and local supply chain strategies, queuing models, and managing system constraints are covered using case studies and hands-on activities such as on-line simulations. Non-traditional operations systems are also explored. The skills required to model an operational system, to reduce variation and mitigate bottlenecks, to effectively present resource needs, and to adjust capacity and inventory service levels are practiced during the course. (Students cannot get credit for both OIE 501 and OIE 500.)

OIE 541. OPERATIONS RISK MANAGEMENT

Operations risk management deals with decision making under uncertainty. It is interdisciplinary, drawing upon management science and managerial decision-making, along with material from negotiation and cognitive psychology. Classic methods from decision analysis are first covered and then applied, from the perspective of business process improvement, to a broad set of applications in operations risk management and design including: quality assurance, supply chains, information security, fire protection engineering, environmental management, projects and new products. A course project is required (and chosen by the student according to his/her interest) to develop skills in integrating subjective and objective information in modeling and evaluating risk. (An introductory understanding of statistics is assumed.)

OIE 542. RISK MANAGEMENT AND DECISION ANALYSIS

Risk management deals with decision making under uncertainty. It is interdisciplinary, drawing upon management science and managerial decision-making, along with material from negotiation and cognitive psychology. Classic methods from decision analysis are first covered and then applied, from the perspective of business process improvement, to a broad set of applications in operations risk management and design including: quality assurance, supply chains, information security, fire protection engineering, environmental management, projects and new products. A course project is required (and chosen by the student according to his/her interest) to develop skills in integrating subjective and objective information in modeling and evaluating risk. (Prerequisite: OIE 501 or equivalent content, or instructor consent.) (Students cannot get credit for both OIE 542 and OIE 541.)

OIE 544. SUPPLY CHAIN ANAYLSIS AND DESIGN

This course studies the decisions and strategies in designing and managing supply chains. Concepts, techniques, and frameworks for better supply chain performance are discussed, and how e-commerce enables companies to be more efficient and flexible in their internal and external operations are explored. The major content of the course is divided into three modules: supply chain integration, supply chain decisions, and supply chain management and control tools. A variety of instructional tools including lectures, case discussions, guest speakers, games, videos, and group projects and presentations are employed. (Prerequisite: OIE 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

OIE 546. MANAGING TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION

This course studies successful innovations and how firms must enhance their ability to develop and introduce new products and processes. The course will discuss a practical model of the dynamics of industrial innovation. Cases and examples will be discussed for products in which cost and product performance are commanding factors. The important interface among R&D/ manufacturing/marketing is discussed. International technology transfer and joint venture issues are also considered.

OIE 548. PRODUCTIVITY MANAGEMENT

Productivity management and analysis techniques and applications are covered from engineering and management perspectives. Topics include benchmarking, production functions, and the concept of relative efficiency and its measurement by data envelopment analysis. Application examples include efficiency evaluations of bank branches, sales outlets, hospitals, schools and others.

OIE 552. MODELING AND OPTIMIZING PROCESSES

This course is designed to provide students with a variety of quantitative tools and techniques useful in modeling, evaluating and optimizing operation processes. Students are oriented toward the creation and use of spreadsheet models to support decision-making in industry and business.

OIE 553. GLOBAL PURCHASING AND LOGISTICS

This course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of the decisions and challenges related to the design and implementation of a firm?s purchasing strategy within a context of an integrated, global supply chain. Topics centering on operational purchasing, strategic sourcing, and strategic cost management will be covered. The global logistics systems that support the purchasing process will be analyzed, and the commonly used techniques for designing and evaluating an effective logistics network will be studied.

OIE 554. GLOBAL OPERATIONS STRATEGY

This course focuses on operations strategy from a global perspective. Topics such as strategy of logistics and decisions to outsource are examined. As an example, the strategic issues concerned with firms that are doing R&D in the United States, circuit board assembly in Ireland and final assembly in Singapore. Cases, textbooks and recent articles relating to the topic are all used. Term paper based on actual cases is required.

OIE 555. LEAN PROCESS DESIGN

Lean thinking has transformed the way that organizational processes are designed and operated, using a systematic approach that eliminates waste by creating flow dictated by customer pull. In this course we explore the lean concepts of value, flow, demand-pull, and perfection in global, multistage processes. The tactics that are used to translate these general principles into practice, such as creating manufacturing cells, are also discussed. The design process is complicated because in reality not all wastes can be eliminated. To learn effective design, students will practice applying lean ideas in case studies and simulations, exploring how variability affects process dynamics and combining this knowledge with analysis of process data.

OIE 558. DESIGNING AND MANAGING SIX-SIGMA PROCESSES

This course teaches Six-Sigma as an organizational quality system and a set of statistical tools that have helped the world?s leading companies save millions of dollars and improve customer satisfaction. This course is organized in three parts: part one covers the essentials of Six-Sigma, including fundamental concepts, the advantages of Six-Sigma over Total Quality Management, and a five-phase model for building a Six-Sigma organization; part two of the course covers the Six-Sigma training, including technical topics such as capability and experimental design as well as how to train ?Black Belts? and other key roles; part three describes the major activities of the Six- Sigma Roadmap, from identifying core processes to executing improvement projects to sustaining Six-Sigma gains.

OIE 598. ST:HEALTH SYS MODEL&IMPROVMET

OIE 598. SPECIAL TOPICS: Instructor-Trapp, Andrew C. OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR BUSINESS ANALYTICS This course covers mathematical optimization in greater detail beyond the foundational concepts of linear programming. A variety of optimization problem classes will be addressed, likely including integer programming, nonlinear programming, stochastic programming and global optimization. While ensuring an appropriate level of theory, the main emphasis will be the methodological and computational aspects of solving such problems arising in the operational, manufacturing, and service sectors. Recommended background: Previous course(s) in linear algebra, basic knowledge about optimization and linear programming, or consent of the instructor

OIE 598. ST:OPTIMZ METHD FOR BUS ANALYT

OIE 598. SPECIAL TOPICS: Instructor-Trapp, Andrew C. OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR BUSINESS ANALYTICS This course covers mathematical optimization in greater detail beyond the foundational concepts of linear programming. A variety of optimization problem classes will be addressed, likely including integer programming, nonlinear programming, stochastic programming and global optimization. While ensuring an appropriate level of theory, the main emphasis will be the methodological and computational aspects of solving such problems arising in the operational, manufacturing, and service sectors. Recommended background: Previous course(s) in linear algebra, basic knowledge about optimization and linear programming, or consent of the instructor