I Give

1998-1999

WPI Professor Is Elected Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE/July 23, 1999
Contact: WPI Media Relations, 508-831-5616

WORCESTER, Mass. - Mohammad Noori of Westborough, Mass., head of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, has been elected to the rank of fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME). He is internationally recognized for his research work in the modeling of hysteretic systems and their random vibration analysis.

ASME fellows are nominated by their peers for significant engineering achievement. Fellows must have more than 10 years of active practice in the society.

Noori's recent research work is focused on the use of autoadaptive materials for seismic application and health monitoring of structural systems. He leads a U.S.-Japan Cooperative Research Team in these areas. He has been invited to President Clinton's Commission on Civil Infrastructure Protection, a public hearing that resulted in a White House report on the topic. He has published more than 120 technical papers and has presented several invited and keynote lectures. Honored as the John Woodman Higgins Professor, he is the director and founder of the Center for Loss Prevention and Structural Integrity at WPI.

Earlier this summer, Noori was elected to serve as the chair of the National Mechanical Engineering Department Heads Committee, an executive board of the national organization for mechanical engineering department heads. Its members hail from more than 300 universities in the United States and Canada.

A promoter of engineering education through industry/university partnerships, he has developed several student project centers at industrial sites. He also has helped establish a collaboration between the University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez and WPI. The relationship allows WPI to develop joint research and educational programs with the largest Hispanic engineering school in the world.

WPI, founded in 1865, is renowned for its project-based curriculum.