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RBE Directed Research Presentation: John Dong | An Adaptive Needle Guidance System to Improve Needle Placement Accuracy in Targeted Biopsy and Treatment for Prostate Cancer

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WPI Robotics Engineering
Wednesday, August 11, 2021
1:00 pm to 2:00 pm

RBE DIRECTED RESEARCH PRESENTATION

 

John Dong

An Adaptive Needle Guidance System to Improve Needle Placement Accuracy in Targeted Biopsy and Treatment for Prostate Cancer

 

Wednesday, August 11, 2021
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Virtual | Zoom: https://partners.zoom.us/my/snrlab

 

Abstract: Targeted biopsy and treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) currently suffers from a lack of needle tip placement accuracy due to the deviation of the needle as a result of its interaction with the surrounding tissue. This error in needle tip placement contributes to false‐negative biopsies and suboptimal treatments during focal ablation. To address this need for higher accuracy needle steering, Johns Hopkins University (JHU) developed a computational model to estimate a surgical needle’s shape based on the readings from Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors located along its length. Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) developed a model to generate control signals for a two degree of‐freedom motorized needle positioner to minimize the error in the needle’s trajectory towards the target.

In order to validate the computational models developed by JHU and BWH, we developed a prototype which integrates their work into one adaptive needle guidance system. The prototype system includes both the physical hardware, as well as a virtual copy simulated in Robot Operating System (ROS) and Gazebo. To ensure that the system can adequately allow testing and collaboration between the team members located in different regions around the world without requiring access to the hardware, we performed a study to measure the synchronization of behaviors between the hardware and the virtual copy. We found that the virtual copy mimics the motion of the hardware to within 0.2 mm, showing that it can serve as an accurate representation of the physical system’s behavior.

Directed Research Advisor:

Dr. Nobuhiko Hata, PhD., Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School

DEPARTMENT(S):