Tracking Rare Whippoorwills on the Island

The Vineyard Gazette included WPI wildlife research in its article. “Marja Bakermans, a researcher at WPI who focuses on migratory songbirds, began a study last year where she outfitted whippoorwills with geolocator backpacks to track the exact spots where the birds winter,” the Gazette reported.

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Artemisia: an herbal tea against malaria?

The French daily newspaper Le Monde published a lengthy feature on the use of Artemisia annua to treat malaria, focusing in large part on work by Pamela Weathers, associate professor of biology and biotechnology, who has been studying Artemisia for more than 25 years. (Note: the article is in French; right click on the page to translate.)

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COULD A PLANT END MALARIA? RESEARCHERS THINK THERE IS HOPE

Newsweek quoted Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology, in this article. Newsweek, referring to Weathers as an ‘expert’ in the field, detailed how she turned the Artemisia annua plant into pills, which she later gave to dying patients in Congo. 

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Foxborough father may have been stung by ‘aggressive’ yellow jackets, experts say

The Boston Globe consulted with Robert J. Gegear, assistant professor and director of the New England Bee-cology Project at WPI, for insight into bee behavior, following a tragic incident in which a Foxborough man died after being stung multiple times by yellow jackets.

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Smartphone app tracks, identifies bee-plant interactions

 “The app collects data on individual species of bee and flowers and allows us to figure out what the individual needs of the species are ... so people can make changes to their yard, learn what flowers to plant, and tell us how do we conserve lands to increase bee diversity,” Robert Gegear, professor of biology and biotechnology, told the T&G.  

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As I See It: Plight of the bumblebee, and how to save it
  • Biology and biotechnology assistant professor Robert J. Gegear wrote an op-ed in the Telegram & Gazette in which he stresses that bumblebee decline has detrimental effects on our ecology and notes differences between bumblebees and honeybees, which were the subject of a prior editorial. 
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Spinach Leaves Are The Heartbeat Of These Scientists' Research

WGBH featured the WPI-related segment interviewing Glenn Gaudette, professor of biomedical engineering, and grad student Joshua Gershlak, on growing heart tissue on spinach.

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Spinach Leaf Transformed Into Beating Human Heart Tissue

National Geographic features a WPI research team that has learned how to grow heart cells on spinach leaves. The stripped down spinach becomes a vascular network to deliver blood, oxygen and nutrients to grow human tissues like cardiac muscle to treat heart attack patients.

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WPI Professor Receives $1.1 Million Grant for Bacteria Study

Scarlet Shell, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, has received a $1.1 million CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation for a five-year program to study the molecular mechanisms bacteria use to survive stressful conditions of starvation and lack of oxygen. 

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The Tragic Tale of Mt. Everest's Most Famous Dead Body

Professor Michael Elmes provides perspective on the factors that may contribute to accidents and casualties during high altitude mountain climbing. 

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