Treating Schistosomiasis with Wormwood Tea

BBC Radio  interviewed Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology, about the benefits of using a tea infused with plant Artemesia annua to treat and cure the parasitic disease schistosomiasis. Artemesia annua is easily grown in Africa, where the illness is more common. (The interview begins at 26:35.)

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Tea Treatment for Schistosomiasis

National Public Radio’s "All Things Considered" profiled research by Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology, comparing the efficacy of sweet wormwood tea to cure the parasitic disease schistosomiasis. The tea cured patients faster than the most common drug treatment and with no adverse side effects. NPR also featured Weathers’ work on its blog last week.

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If A Worm Makes You Sick, Can This Cup Of Tea Cure You?

In a story on National Public Radio’s Goats and Soda blog, health reporter Jason Beaubien describes a new study co-authored by Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology, that showed that tea infusions made from the wormwood plant cured patients with schistosomiasis faster than the commonly used drug.

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Schistosomiasis: Artemisia tea infusions just as effective as praziquantel for treatment

Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology, was interviewed for an article and podcast on Outbreak News Today regarding her study testing the efficacy of a tea infusion made from the wormwood plant to cure the tropical disease schistosomiasis. The tea cured patients and cleared them of the parasitic infection much faster than the drug most commonly used, and with no adverse side effects.

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WPI Forum on CRISPR Breakthrough

Worcester News Tonight covered a forum held at WPI on the gene-editing technology known as CRISPR.

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WPI professors raise ethical questions on CRISPR breakthrough

The Worcester Business Journal covered a WPI forum on the gene-editing technology known as CRISPR. Noted in the article were: Dean, Arts and Sciences, Jean King; Assistant Professor, Social Science, Patricia Stapleton; Associate Professor, Humanities and Arts Bethel Eddy; Associate Professor, Biology and Biotechnology, Rita Rao; and Associate Teaching Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Destin Heilman.

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Wild Bees are Dying and Ecosystem Collapse will Follow—but Nobody's Taking Notice

In a Q&A with Rob Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, Newsweek reported on the decline in pollinators, how people can help bumblebees, and the Bee-cology project, Gegear's app that enables citizen scientists to collect data on native bees. 

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The Self-Taught Gardener: Embracing Codependency

A recent speech by Robert J. Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, at the Berkshire (Mass.) Botanical Garden was cited in this Berkshire Edge article.

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WPI Researcher's Study Shows that Pesticides Might be Adding to Bumblebee Decline

WBUR spoke with Rob Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, about his research on the decline of bumblebees. His work explores neonicotinoids - an ingredient in pesticides that can be purchased in hardware stores - and how the chemical might be a key factor in the decreasing numbers of native bees.

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Pesticide could be killing Massachusetts' endangered bumblebees, study finds

MassLive featured research by Robert Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, that uncovered a new link between neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and wild bumblebee decline. MassLive also featured Gegear’s work in the editorial, “Bee Crisis Is Nothing to Snicker At.”

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Artemisia and malaria: health in the hands of Africans

Professor Pam Weathers, biology and biotechnology, was interviewed for this Paris Match article. “Convinced that Artemisia is a therapeutic path adapted to developing countries, the American biologist is studying the action of an oral treatment that she developed in 2008,” Paris Match stated.

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How studying business, engineering in college can lead to jobs

WPI’s multi-faceted approach to preparing engineering students for the work force was featured in this article. “The multidisciplinary component is especially key, said Biology Professor Karen Kashmanian Oates. “None of these problems will be solved just by an engineer, so we are interested in combining the very best of engineering and the very best of liberal arts and sciences.” 

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Tracking Rare Whippoorwills on the Island

The Vineyard Gazette included WPI wildlife research in its article. “Marja Bakermans, a researcher at WPI who focuses on migratory songbirds, began a study last year where she outfitted whippoorwills with geolocator backpacks to track the exact spots where the birds winter,” the Gazette reported.

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Artemisia: an herbal tea against malaria?

The French daily newspaper Le Monde published a lengthy feature on the use of Artemisia annua to treat malaria, focusing in large part on work by Pamela Weathers, associate professor of biology and biotechnology, who has been studying Artemisia for more than 25 years. (Note: the article is in French; right click on the page to translate.)

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COULD A PLANT END MALARIA? RESEARCHERS THINK THERE IS HOPE

Newsweek quoted Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology, in this article. Newsweek, referring to Weathers as an ‘expert’ in the field, detailed how she turned the Artemisia annua plant into pills, which she later gave to dying patients in Congo. 

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Foxborough father may have been stung by ‘aggressive’ yellow jackets, experts say

The Boston Globe consulted with Robert J. Gegear, assistant professor and director of the New England Bee-cology Project at WPI, for insight into bee behavior, following a tragic incident in which a Foxborough man died after being stung multiple times by yellow jackets.

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Smartphone app tracks, identifies bee-plant interactions

 “The app collects data on individual species of bee and flowers and allows us to figure out what the individual needs of the species are ... so people can make changes to their yard, learn what flowers to plant, and tell us how do we conserve lands to increase bee diversity,” Robert Gegear, professor of biology and biotechnology, told the T&G.  

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As I See It: Plight of the bumblebee, and how to save it
  • Biology and biotechnology assistant professor Robert J. Gegear wrote an op-ed in the Telegram & Gazette in which he stresses that bumblebee decline has detrimental effects on our ecology and notes differences between bumblebees and honeybees, which were the subject of a prior editorial. 
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Spinach Leaves Are The Heartbeat Of These Scientists' Research

WGBH featured the WPI-related segment interviewing Glenn Gaudette, professor of biomedical engineering, and grad student Joshua Gershlak, on growing heart tissue on spinach.

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Spinach Leaf Transformed Into Beating Human Heart Tissue

National Geographic features a WPI research team that has learned how to grow heart cells on spinach leaves. The stripped down spinach becomes a vascular network to deliver blood, oxygen and nutrients to grow human tissues like cardiac muscle to treat heart attack patients.

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