Sharing Data Faster to Fight an Epidemic

Bioinformatics professor Dmitry Korkin was featured in an article highlighting a trend in researchers bypassing traditional journals in favor of publishing their findings more quickly online. Korkin and his team built a 3D roadmap of the coronavirus and posted it online to provide a tool for others to use in their own research. “We felt the urgency of this work,” Korkin said.

Here’s how local researchers are helping cure the new coronavirus

A stand-alone story about WPI’s role in developing and sharing a 3D roadmap of the novel coronavirus appears in Boston.com. The story includes quotes from WPI bioinformatics professor Dmitry Korkin and PhD students Senbao Lu and Oleksandr Narykov. The piece also includes several photos, a graphic of the novel coronavirus, and a 30-second video explainer.

 

Coronavirus 3D roadmap: WPI researcher’s model could help find a treatment

WPI professor Dmitry Korkin is interviewed in this story about his role in guiding a research team in developing and sharing the 3D roadmap of the novel coronavirus. The story includes comments from PhD student Ziyang Gao, who has friends in the region most impacted by coronavirus. The story also includes an explainer graphic.

WPI Professor and Students Create 3D Models of Coronavirus

Dmitry Korkin, associate professor of computer science at WPI and director of the university’s bioinformatics and computational biology program, appears on a three-minute segment on NBC10 discussing his role in developing and sharing the 3D roadmap of the novel coronavirus. The segment includes insightful comments from PhD students Ziyang Gao and Hongzhu Cui.

WPI Professor, Grad Students Share Coronavirus Roadmap

Dmitry Korkin, associate professor of computer science, spoke with WBZ News Radio about the structural road map of the 2019 novel conoravirus he and his graduate students developed. The goal of the research is to reach new breakthroughs in treating the virus.

WPI Professor Develops 3D Model of Coronavirus

Dmitry Korkin, associate professor of computer science, was featured in the Telegram & Gazette for groundbreaking research he is doing to create a structural 3D roadmap of the new coronavirus. The story includes multiple photos and a 60-second video.

Too Hot, Too Cold? Scientists Search For The Optimal Temperature For Learning

Forbes reported online about research led by Shichao Liu to study the optimal indoor conditions for learning. Liu, Jacob Whitehill and Steven Van Dessel received $299,991 develop technologies that detect and boost student engagement in lessons by controlling classroom temperature, ventilation, and lighting.

WPI Researcher Gets $1M Grant to Develop Technology for Deaf Users

Erin Solovey, assistant professor of computer science, was featured in a Telegram & Gazette article. Solovey received a $1 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant that could lead to significant breakthroughs in technology platforms for the ASL-signing Deaf Community.

Ring Recommends Users Update Their Home Security System Passwords After String of Hacking Incidents

Time interviewed Craig Shue, associate professor of computer science, for this article (scroll down to 8th graph).  Shue told Time he agrees hackers are likely getting Rings users’ account information from third parties. “I would also encourage everybody to do their own form of risk assessment and determine what they need in these devices and whether it’s worth the risk to have that functionality,” he added. 

 

I Took a Break From the Classroom to Help Do Research. It Made Me a Stronger Teacher.

EdSurge published an article by seventh-grade teacher Andrew Burnett, FA Day Middle School in Newton, in which she sited her work with Neil Heffernan, the William Smith Dean's Professor of Computer Science and the director of the Learning Sciences and Technologies Program at WPI. She detailed how her research for Heffernan, involving ASSISTments, a responsive online learning tool based in learning science that was founded by Heffernan and his wife, impacted her teaching when she returned to the classroom.

WPI's $8M Grant for ASSISTments

Boston 25 reported that WPI is getting an $8 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to scale up ASSISTments, a middle-school math assessment tool. ASSISTments was created by Neil Heffernan, the William Smith Dean Professor of Computer Science and the director of the Learning Sciences and Technologies Program at WPI, and his wife, Cristina Heffernan.

The new wave of business cyber attacks

Associate Computer Science Professor Craig Shue was interviewed by the Worcester Business Journal for this article. As companies increase their defenses, hackers, meanwhile, react. “It is an arms race. We do have an ebb and flow going back and forth,” Shue said. “It almost feels like a competitive sport at times

Persistence Is Not Always Productive: How to Stop Students From Spinning Their Wheels

Neil Heffernan, professor of computer science and director of the Learning Sciences and Technologies Program, had his opinion piece published in Ed Surge

WPI Students Developing Robot that can Find and Detonate Landmines

Boston 25 news broadcasted a segment on WPI students, under the guidance of Craig Putnam, senior instructor, computer science, developing an autonomous rover and payload-deploying drone that work together to search for and detonate landmines.

Should Cities Ever Pay Ransom to Hackers?

Craig Shue, associate professor of computer science and cybersecurity, contributed his thoughts in a Wall Street Journal point-counterpoint opinion piece, “Should Cities Ever Pay Ransom to Hackers?” Shue’s position: “YES: Sometimes, the Benefits of Paying a Ransom Outweigh the Costs."

WPI, UMass Lowell team to support $111K in research

The Worcester Business Journal reported on WPI and the University of Massachusetts Lowell partnering to award more than $111,000 in seed funding to six different teams, focusing on work ranging from human-robot collaboration to cancer detection and rehabilitation for stroke patients.

Artificial Intelligence: Moving Beyond Computer Science

Computer Science Professor Michael Gennert had his article published in Educational Technology Insights.

Heffernan: How Can We Know If Ed Tech Works? By Encouraging Companies & Researchers to Share Data. Government Funding Can Help

An op-ed by Neil Heffernan, professor of computer science and director of Learning Sciences & Technologies, published by The 74 Million, discusses how sharing data can inform researchers whether education technology is actually working.

FaceApp Is Getting People to Age Overnight. Here's What You Should Know About Its Security Concerns

Time interviewed Associate Computer Science Professor Craig Shue for its article (10th graph), “FaceApp Is Getting People to Age Overnight. Here's What You Should Know About Its Security Concern.” “It’s all about your tolerance for risk,” Shue told Time. “In this case the user is giving third party company a very high-quality image of themselves that they can do what they want with.”

OPINION: Online homework tools trade ‘busy work’ for feedback to help end inequities in schools

Computer science professor Neil Heffernan’s opinion piece in the Hechinger Report takes a look at the need for new technology and evidence-based instructional practices, such as online homework tools, to address inequities in our public school system.

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