WPI Shows Off New PracticePoint Labs-a Place Where Ideas can be Tested

The Telegram & Gazette in this article, highlighted the university’s ribbon-cutting at PracticePoint, its membership-based development and testing facility. PracticePoint labs is a collaborative health care technology facility that university, state and business leaders hope will deliver breakthroughs in medical devices.

WPI Marks Opening of New $17M PracticePoint Facility

The Worcester Business Journal highlighted WPI’s PracticePoint ribbon-cutting event in its article​, "WPI Marks Opening of New $17M PracticePoint Facility​." PracticePoint is the university’s membership-based development and testing facility. The goal of this alliance space is to advance healthcare technologies and launch better medical cyber-physical systems, through collaboration across the spectrum of product development and implementation. 

WPI Professor Adam Powell discusses benefits of new welding technique on car designs

WBUR radio aired a segment about Adam Powell, associate professor of mechanical engineering, who is testing a new type of welding that may make car joints more resistant to corrosion, leading to lighter and more fuel efficient cars. Powell said the welding process is ideal for car doors, which are “especially beneficial for a car with reduced weight in some other parts that need just another 20 or 40 pounds of additional weight reduction to get to that smaller engine.”

WPI Researcher Uses Corrosion Test Chamber to Simulate Road Salt Impacts on Future Car Designs

WBZ Radio reported on Adam Powell, associate professor of mechanical engineering, testing a new type of welding that may make the joint between light metal alloys more resistant to corrosion, including salt spray, leading to future designs of durable, next-generation metal car joints used in ultra-light car doors and other vehicle body applications. This “could cut the weight in half of a lot of major parts of a vehicle,” Powell told WBZ.

WPI is researching ways to help your car survive New England’s salt-covered winter roads

MassLive reported on WPI's research to help cars survive New England's salt-covered winter roads. ​Adam Powell, associate professor of mechanical engineering, was awarded a three-year, $1.5 million grant from the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office for the research.

 

5 takeaways from Day 2 of the Healthcare Robotics Engineering Forum

The Robot Report quoted Gregory Fischer, professor of mechanical engineering, in its coverage of the Healthcare Robotics Engineering Forum in California. He described the work done at WPI’s PracticePoint development and testing facility on robotic systems that can work on a patient inside an MRI machine. “We’re adding cooperative control like that for an autonomous car, with the doctor pushing the gas and the robot steering,” said Fischer, who is also director of PracticePoint. “PracticePoint is working in real time in clinical environments.” 

WPI Engineers Create Wireless Oxygen Sensor for Sick Babies

Boston 25 reported on WPI researchers developing a sensor the size of a Band-Aid to measure a baby’s blood oxygen levels, a vital indication of the lungs’ effectiveness and whether the baby’s tissue is receiving adequate oxygen supply. This wearable device will be flexible and stretchable, wireless, inexpensive, and mobile - possibly allowing the child to leave the hospital and be monitored remotely.

WPI Explores Robots In The Workplace

WBZ News Radio interviewed Cagdas Onal, associate professor of mechanical engineering about a $3m NSF grant WPI received to study how humans and robots can co-exist in the workplace.

WPI receives $3M to study human-robot workplace interaction

The Worcester Business Journal reported on WPI receiving $3 million from the National Science Foundation to study human-robot interaction in the workplace. Eight WPI researchers are involved: Cagdas Onal (principal investigator), Yunus Telliel, Jeanine Skorinko, Winston Soboyejo, Jing Xiao, Pratap Rao, Soussan Djamasbi and Jane Li
 

WPI gets $1.9M grant to help better detect prostate cancer

The Associated Press published a Telegram & Gazette article on WPI’s Haichong (Kai) Zhang, assistant professor in biomedical engineering and robotics engineering, and his five-year $1.8 million Director's Early Independence Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It’s to create a robotic system that will detect and analyze three different indicators of prostate cancer.

WPI engineer creating prostate-exam robot receives $2M grant

The Worcester Business Journal featured Haichong (Kai) Zhang, assistant professor in biomedical engineering and robotics engineering, and his receiving a five-year $1,869,423 Director's Early Independence Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It’s for his ongoing work to create a robotic system that will detect and analyze three different indicators of prostate cancer. Gregory Fischer, professor of robotics engineering, is also working on the project.

‘I know I can do it’: WPI student looks forward to an engineering-related career — despite blindness

In a front-page article, The Boston Globe profiled WPI student  Jack Duffy-Protentis. “The sky’s the limit for Jack,’’ his mother told The Globe. “He’s innovative. He’s all personality. The experience at WPI made me realize that it’s not a disability for Jack. He’s differently abled, that’s all.’’​

The robots in our future

WPI mechanical engineering professor Greg Fischer, the director of WPI’s Automation and Interventional Medicine Lab, is noted in a story about medical robotics and his research on MRI-compatible robots for cancer therapy.

WPI team gets $25M Army grant to improve 3-D printing for repairing metal parts

The Telegram & Gazette featured WPI research by Danielle Cote, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, in this article. Cote and Kyle Tsaknopoulos, a postdoctoral fellow at WPI, will use the funding to advance a cold spray 3D printing technique that could be used to repair military vehicles and equipment.  The grant will also allow their research to bring in other departments at WPI, like robotics and data science.

WPI Researchers Discuss Work with Army Research Lab

Danielle Cote, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, and Kyle Tsaknopoulos, a postdoctoral fellow at WPI, discuss their $25 million award to advance a cold spray 3D printing technique that could be used to repair military vehicles and equipment. Cote noted that they alter the chemical composition of spray powders, where “a small adjustment in composition can make a big difference.”

WPI Receives a $25M Award to Study 3D Printing Techniques

Boston 25 reported news about WPI receiving a $25 million award from the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Army Research Laboratory. Danielle Cote, assistant professor of materials science and engineering and director of WPI’s Center for Materials Processing Data, is the principal investigator for the project.

WPI, UMass Lowell team to support $111K in research

The Worcester Business Journal reported on WPI and the University of Massachusetts Lowell partnering to award more than $111,000 in seed funding to six different teams, focusing on work ranging from human-robot collaboration to cancer detection and rehabilitation for stroke patients.

Indian American Researcher’s Team Develops Chip to Capture Circulating Tumor Cells

IndiaWest newspaper reported on a new liquid biopsy chip developed by Balaji Panchapakesan, professor of mechanical engineering. The chip was designed to capture circulating tumor cells, making it possible for early-stage cancer detection.

WPI Designs Chip to Capture Circulating Cancer Cells

WBZ Radio interviewed Balaji Panchapakesan, professor of mechanical engineering, on the chip he designed to capture circulating tumor cells, making it possible for early-stage cancer detection.  “He says the chip could be revolutionary,” WBZ reported. “If we can detect it using this chip early detection, which is actually the key, we could actually save lives,” Panchapakesan said.

WPI Develops a New Liquid Biopsy Chip

NBC Louisville reported on a new liquid biopsy chip developed by Balaji Panchapakesan, professor of mechanical engineering. The chip was designed to capture circulating tumor cells, making it possible for early-stage cancer detection.

Pages