WPI's $8M Grant for ASSISTments

Boston 25 reported that WPI is getting an $8 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to scale up ASSISTments, a middle-school math assessment tool. ASSISTments was created by Neil Heffernan, the William Smith Dean Professor of Computer Science and the director of the Learning Sciences and Technologies Program at WPI, and his wife, Cristina Heffernan.

Boston 25
The new wave of business cyber attacks

Associate Computer Science Professor Craig Shue was interviewed by the Worcester Business Journal for this article. As companies increase their defenses, hackers, meanwhile, react. “It is an arms race. We do have an ebb and flow going back and forth,” Shue said. “It almost feels like a competitive sport at times

Worcester Business Journal
Persistence Is Not Always Productive: How to Stop Students From Spinning Their Wheels

Neil Heffernan, professor of computer science and director of the Learning Sciences and Technologies Program, had his opinion piece published in Ed Surge

edsurge
WPI Students Developing Robot that can Find and Detonate Landmines

Boston 25 news broadcasted a segment on WPI students, under the guidance of Craig Putnam, senior instructor, computer science, developing an autonomous rover and payload-deploying drone that work together to search for and detonate landmines.

Boston 25
Should Cities Ever Pay Ransom to Hackers?

Craig Shue, associate professor of computer science and cybersecurity, contributed his thoughts in a Wall Street Journal point-counterpoint opinion piece, “Should Cities Ever Pay Ransom to Hackers?” Shue’s position: “YES: Sometimes, the Benefits of Paying a Ransom Outweigh the Costs."

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WPI, UMass Lowell team to support $111K in research

The Worcester Business Journal reported on WPI and the University of Massachusetts Lowell partnering to award more than $111,000 in seed funding to six different teams, focusing on work ranging from human-robot collaboration to cancer detection and rehabilitation for stroke patients.

Worcester Business Journal
Artificial Intelligence: Moving Beyond Computer Science

Computer Science Professor Michael Gennert had his article published in Educational Technology Insights.

Education Technology Insight
Heffernan: How Can We Know If Ed Tech Works? By Encouraging Companies & Researchers to Share Data. Government Funding Can Help

An op-ed by Neil Heffernan, professor of computer science and director of Learning Sciences & Technologies, published by The 74 Million, discusses how sharing data can inform researchers whether education technology is actually working.

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FaceApp Is Getting People to Age Overnight. Here's What You Should Know About Its Security Concerns

Time interviewed Associate Computer Science Professor Craig Shue for its article (10th graph), “FaceApp Is Getting People to Age Overnight. Here's What You Should Know About Its Security Concern.” “It’s all about your tolerance for risk,” Shue told Time. “In this case the user is giving third party company a very high-quality image of themselves that they can do what they want with.”

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OPINION: Online homework tools trade ‘busy work’ for feedback to help end inequities in schools

Computer science professor Neil Heffernan’s opinion piece in the Hechinger Report takes a look at the need for new technology and evidence-based instructional practices, such as online homework tools, to address inequities in our public school system.

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WPI Develops Next Generation of Autonomous Vehicle Ideas

The Robotics Business Review highlighted work by Major Qualifying Project (MQP) teams, ranging from an autonomous vehicle platform to a robot that can guide prospective students around a campus.

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Junior AI researchers are in demand by universities and industry

Nature reported on the increased demand of AI researchers by universities and businesses, citing a report by Craig Wills, professor and department head of computer science, who has been studying the increase in unfilled tenure track faculty positions in this field.  
 

Nature International Weekly Journal of Science
WPI ‘Thinking Cap’ Study Could Improve Online Learning

In their “Eye on Education” segment, WBZ-TV Boston featured research led by computer science assistant professor Erin Solovey, who, through a collaborative $1 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant, will explore the use of sensors to measure brain activity during learning.

CBS Boston
WPI Algorave

Worcester News Tonight covered New England's first Algorave, which was brought to PopUp Worcester by Charlie Roberts, assistant professor of computer science. Roberts, along with Gillian Smith, assistant professor of computer science, participated in live coding to create images and music simultaneously for attendees to enjoy. Roberts said one of the goals of the event was to combine computer science with art to make coding easier to digest and more accessible to students. (Clip begins at 9:21)

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A New Kind of Thinking Cap for Online Learning

NSF360 (2:17 mark), the National Science Foundation’s online news channel featured work by Erin Solovey, assistant professor of computer science, on using non-invasive sensors to capture brain wave images to better understand how a person learns using on-line programs. Solovey’s research received $1 million in funding from the NSF.  

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College Town: WPI to Host Women in Data Science Conference

The Telegram & Gazette's College Town led off with news of WPI hosting its second annual Women in Data Science Central Massachusetts Conference, a satellite event coinciding with the annual Global Women in Data Science Conference. 

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WPI Thinking Cap

Channel 3 “Worcester News Tonight” aired an interview with Erin Solovey, associate professor of computer science, about her NSF-funded research. Solovey is leading a team of researchers in developing a new program combining computer science and neuroscience tools to study online learning.

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College Town: WPI Computer Scientist Developing Anti-hacking Technology

The T&G's College Town reported on work by Craig Shue, associate professor of computer science, to develop "containerization" technology, to prevent a malware attack via commercial websites. Shue received a three-year grant from the National Science foundation for this work. 

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Schools Don’t Need to Ban Homework, They Just Need to Make It Better

Education Post featured an op-ed by Neil Heffernan, professor of computer science and director of learning sciences and technologies, that examines ways school districts nationwide can make homework more effective and relevant. In “Schools Don’t Need to Ban Homework; They Just Need to Make It Better,” Heffernan argues for homework technologies that help replicate the kind of back-and-forth interactions that students and teachers have in class.

Education Post
WPI receives $895K to develop artificial intelligence fellowships

The Worcester Business Journal reported that WPI received a $895,000 grant from the Department of Education to provide six fellowships to graduate students looking to pursue studies in artificial intelligence. The program, called Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAAN), comes in anticipation of a decrease in artificial intelligence professionals in the field. GAAN will train students in the artificial intelligence field, and connect them with colleagues in academic, industry and government settings.  

Worcester Business Journal

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