Fat-shaming pregnant women isn’t just mean, it’s harmful

An article written by Angela Incollingo Rodriguez, assistant professor of social science and policy studies, was published in The Conversation. Rodriguez’s research suggests that nearly two-thirds of pregnant and postpartum women experience some form of weight stigma. In the article she writes, “As a health psychologist studying weight stigma and its consequences, I see pregnancy as an important new avenue for research.”
 

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Suicide-by-Text Is a Disturbing New Form of Domestic Violence

Vice cited work by Professor Emily Douglas, head of the Department of Social Science and Policy Studies, for this article. The publication cited a 2016 analysis co-authored by Douglas, that found while women are more likely to be injured (or killed) in domestic violence disputes, men and women inflict violence on their intimate partners at roughly the same rate.

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WPI receives $3M to study human-robot workplace interaction

The Worcester Business Journal reported on WPI receiving $3 million from the National Science Foundation to study human-robot interaction in the workplace. Eight WPI researchers are involved: Cagdas Onal (principal investigator), Yunus Telliel, Jeanine Skorinko, Winston Soboyejo, Jing Xiao, Pratap Rao, Soussan Djamasbi and Jane Li
 

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Bans on rebuilding in disaster-prone areas ignore homeowners preferences – raising costs works better

The Conversation published this article by Alexander Smith, associate professor of economics.

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Women who drink are judged more harshly than men, report finds

Boston 25 News reported on WPI research on women and alcohol. “Professor Jeanine Skorinko from Worcester Polytechic Institute wanted to find out about the perceptions women face when they go out for a drink,” the broadcast stated.

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Women, Alcohol and Perceived ‘Sexual Availability’

In the article, “Women, Alcohol and Perceived ‘Sexual Availability”, The New York Times reported on a study coauthored by Jeanne Skorinko, professor of psychology, “She Looks Like She’d Be an Animal in Bed: Dehumanization of Drinking Women in Social Contexts.” 

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New Paths to Full Professor

This Inside Higher Ed article featured work by WPI faculty and administration to clarify the university’s faculty promotion guidelines to better support associate professors and offer options that go beyond traditional research paths.

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Study Shows that Women Who Drink Alcohol in Public are Dehumanized

WBUR talked with Jeanine Skorinko, professor of psychology, about her research on how women who drink alcohol in social settings are seen as less human by other women and men. 

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WPI Prof's Study Examines Gender Bias in Social Drinking

The Telegram and Gazette reported on a study by Jeanine Skorinko, professor of social science and policy studies that looks at the social perceptions of women and men who drink alcohol and considers the consequences of these perceptions.
 

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WPI study looks at impact of weight-shaming pregnant women

Boston 25 spoke with Angela Incollingo Rodriguez, assistant professor of social science and policy studies, regarding her research about the impact of weight stigma or fat shaming on pregnant and postpartum women.

Boston 25
The Impact of Weight Stigma on Pregnant and Postpartum Women

This morning, WBUR featured an interview with Angela C. Incollingo Rodriguez, assistant professor of psychology, on her research - the first such study of its kind - into the impact of weight stigma on pregnant and postpartum women. 

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As I See It: Public's interest is crucial in gene-editing Discussion

An op-ed by Patricia Stapleton, assistant professor of social science and policy studies, was published in today's Telegram & Gazette.

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WPI Addresses Unconscious Bias

WPI’s ongoing efforts to prepare students for an increasingly diverse workforce were highlighted in this Diversity in Action article. “Researchers will teach WPI students how to identify and address bias and work in groups in ways that promote equity,” the article stated.

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WPI professor and associates get $3.3M grant to test new algebra learning game

Assistant Professor Erin Ottmar, psychology and learning sciences, was highlighted in this Telegram & Gazette article. “We have very strong evidence that it’s useful,” she said of the game called “From Here to There!.”  

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The age of the Worcester skyscraper has been replaced by street-level interactions

The Worcester Business Journal interviewed Rob Krueger, associate professor of social science & policy studies, about why the city of Worcester seems to no longer construct skyscrapers. Towers are often built for two main reasons, Krueger noted: land values are high, or a builder or owner wants to spend the money. 

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Major Storms & Community Resilience

Patricia Stapleton, assistant professor of social sciences & policy studies, along with a colleague from Plymouth State University, published an article about their work on a new teaching modules that helps educators address disaster reduction challenges.

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As I See It: Major storms & climate change: Rethinking our approach to the elephant in the room

Patricia A. Stapleton, assistant professor of Social Science & Policy Studies and director of The Society, Technology and Policy program, wrote an “As I See It” op-ed in the Telegram & Gazette. In the article, Stapleton noted that debating the impact of climate change is a distraction that “undermines public support to develop and implement hazard mitigation plans.”

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Will CRISPR fears fade with familiarity?

The Conversation published this article by Patricia Stapleton, assistant professor and director of the Society, Technology and Policy Program.

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Why You Shouldn’t Walk on Escalators

The New York Times quoted WPI’s Jeanine L. Skorinko, associate professor of psychology. She told The Times, that people, especially Americans, prefer more distance between themselves and strangers and would rather take the stair below them or walk past them. “This is why people put bags on seats next to them on the train so people don’t sit next to them,” she said.

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