Indian American Researcher’s Team Develops Chip to Capture Circulating Tumor Cells

IndiaWest newspaper reported on a new liquid biopsy chip developed by Balaji Panchapakesan, professor of mechanical engineering. The chip was designed to capture circulating tumor cells, making it possible for early-stage cancer detection.

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WPI Designs Chip to Capture Circulating Cancer Cells

WBZ Radio interviewed Balaji Panchapakesan, professor of mechanical engineering, on the chip he designed to capture circulating tumor cells, making it possible for early-stage cancer detection.  “He says the chip could be revolutionary,” WBZ reported. “If we can detect it using this chip early detection, which is actually the key, we could actually save lives,” Panchapakesan said.

WBZ News Radio
WPI Develops a New Liquid Biopsy Chip

NBC Louisville reported on a new liquid biopsy chip developed by Balaji Panchapakesan, professor of mechanical engineering. The chip was designed to capture circulating tumor cells, making it possible for early-stage cancer detection.

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Novel Liquid Biopsy Chip Design Dramatically Improves Cancer Detection

Breakthrough technology developed by Balaji Panchapakesan, associate professor of mechanical engineering at WPI, is highlighted in this premier biotech publication.

GEN
First Look: New approach to liquid biopsy catches cancer cells on cusp of metastasis

The Boston Globe national publication STAT reports on how a chip developed by mechanical engineers led by Balaji Panchapakesan, associate professor of mechanical engineering, that can trap and identify metastatic cancer cells in a small amount of blood drawn from a cancer patient. 

STAT News