Wild Bees are Dying and Ecosystem Collapse will Follow—but Nobody's Taking Notice

In a Q&A with Rob Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, Newsweek reported on the decline in pollinators, how people can help bumblebees, and the Bee-cology project, Gegear's app that enables citizen scientists to collect data on native bees. 

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The Self-Taught Gardener: Embracing Codependency

A recent speech by Robert J. Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, at the Berkshire (Mass.) Botanical Garden was cited in this Berkshire Edge article.

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WPI Researcher's Study Shows that Pesticides Might be Adding to Bumblebee Decline

WBUR spoke with Rob Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, about his research on the decline of bumblebees. His work explores neonicotinoids - an ingredient in pesticides that can be purchased in hardware stores - and how the chemical might be a key factor in the decreasing numbers of native bees.

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Pesticide could be killing Massachusetts' endangered bumblebees, study finds

MassLive featured research by Robert Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, that uncovered a new link between neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and wild bumblebee decline. MassLive also featured Gegear’s work in the editorial, “Bee Crisis Is Nothing to Snicker At.”

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Foxborough father may have been stung by ‘aggressive’ yellow jackets, experts say

The Boston Globe consulted with Robert J. Gegear, assistant professor and director of the New England Bee-cology Project at WPI, for insight into bee behavior, following a tragic incident in which a Foxborough man died after being stung multiple times by yellow jackets.

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Bee Bill

Rob Gegear, assistant professor of biology and biotechnology, was interviewed in a story about legislation being filed by State Representative Carolyn Dykema of Holliston to minimize the use neonicotinoids, a class of pesticides that have a harmful effect on bees and bee colonies—a major threat to the ecosystem and agriculture. 

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What would happen if bees disappeared?
  • The Boston Globe interviewed Robert Gegear, assistant professor, biology and biotechnology, in the Q&A, “What Would Happen if Bees Disappeared?” Gegear discussed his new bee app that allows users to import a photo or video of a bee to a database for analysis.
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Smartphone app tracks, identifies bee-plant interactions

 “The app collects data on individual species of bee and flowers and allows us to figure out what the individual needs of the species are ... so people can make changes to their yard, learn what flowers to plant, and tell us how do we conserve lands to increase bee diversity,” Robert Gegear, professor of biology and biotechnology, told the T&G.  

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As I See It: Plight of the bumblebee, and how to save it
  • Biology and biotechnology assistant professor Robert J. Gegear wrote an op-ed in the Telegram & Gazette in which he stresses that bumblebee decline has detrimental effects on our ecology and notes differences between bumblebees and honeybees, which were the subject of a prior editorial. 
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