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The MQP team working on the landmine rover. alt
The MQP team working on the landmine rover.
May 14, 2020
WPI student working on autonomous car alt
Nikolas Gamarra '19 works on a robot that could help charge electric cars.
June 04, 2019
William Godsey ’18, left, and Bradley Miller, associate director of WPI’s Robotics Resource Center, examine the lionfish harvesting robot built by Godsey and his project team. alt
William Godsey ’18, left, and Bradley Miller, associate director of WPI’s Robotics Resource Center, examine the lionfish harvesting robot built by Godsey and his project team.The robot is designed to help reduce the harm caused by an invasive species.
August 22, 2018

Media Coverage

Drone and rover tag teams could help solve the world’s deadly land mine problem

Under Emerging TechDigital Trends interviewed Craig Putnam, associate director of robotics engineering, about the student-led project that is developing the autonomous rover and payload-deploying drone. The goal is to find and safely destroy hidden munitions that kill or maim as many as 20,000 people around the world each year. Putnam told Digital Trends, “the goal was to come up with a system that was as low cost as reasonably possible so that it could be afforded by some remote village that has a problem with land mines in the area.”

Rover-Drone Combo Hope to Spot and Destroy Landmines

BBC News profiled WPI landmine-related research in this segment. “I believe we’re probably the first that’s been doing the robot drone duo in the context of looking for landmines. Initially, it was just the aerial part then we worked on the rover. Now we’re trying to bring it all together,” Craig Putnam, associate director, robotics engineering, told the BBC. The student teams are developing the autonomous rover and payload-deploying drone to find and safely destroy hidden munitions that kill or maim as many as 20,000 people around the world each year.