Mechanical Engineering

ME 230X. NANOBIOTECHNLGY LAB EXPERIENCE

ME 231X. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL SOLUTIONS FOR ENGINEERING PROBLEMS

The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts of programming and numerical methods using Matlab within an engineering framework. The course will review basic linear algebra, statics, stress analysis, and engineering governing equations with solution pathways developed and presented as numerical programming problems. The fundamental programming techniques cover a variety of input and output formats typically encountered in engineering situations. Control and conditional loops, recognizing and controlling numerical error, numerical integration and differentiation will be introduced and developed within an engineering framework. Recommended background: Statics (ES 2501), Stress Analysis (ES 2502), General Physics-Mechanics (PH 1110), Differential and Integral Calculus (MA 1021, MA 1022) or equivalents.

ME 1520. THE TECHNOLOGY OF ALPINE SKIING

This course explores science and engineering issues associated with equipment and technique for alpine skiing, particularly racing. A diverse group of technical subjects related to engineering mechanics are discussed: tribology, beams, rigid body motion, material science, machining and biomechanics. Specifically we will examine: ski-snow interactions, technique for gliding, turning and stepping, selection of line in racing; equipment design, testing and performance; and ski injuries. We will also address issues in the epidemiology of skiing injuries, the calculation of the cost of ski injuries to society, the impact of ski equipment technology on litigation and the impact of litigation on equipment and trail design.

ME 1800. MANUFACTURING SCIENCE, PROTOTYPING, AND COMPUTER-CONTROLLED MACHINING

Cat. I This course introduces students to manufacturing science and engineering and prototype part production. It emphasizes CNC (computer-controlled) machining. Students will learn how to go from a solid (CAD, computer-aided design) model to a machined part, using CAM software (computer-aided manufacturing) and CNC machining. They will also be exposed to associated issues in manufacturing process analysis, engineering design, material science, and in dimensional and surface metrology. Using machining as an example, the science of manufacturing processes is developed in a combination of class work and laboratory experience. The laboratory experience includes an experimental component that relates process variables in machining with performance and machined part quality. Students whose project work will necessitate fabrication of parts and those who want a background in manufacturing process science and engineering should take this course.

ME 2300. INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN

This project based course introduces students to the engineering design process including; identifying the need, benchmarking, writing design specifications, evaluating alternative designs and selecting a final design. Student groups will construct and evaluate a working prototype of their design. Additional topics include; creativity, product liability, reverse engineering, patents, and codes of ethics for engineers. Extensive written reports and oral presentations are required. Recommended background: ES 1310, ES 2501, ES 2502 and ME 1800.

ME 2301. NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY EXPERIENCE

The current developments and experimental skills in nanoscale bioscience and biotechnology will be introduced. Experimental skills such as nanomaterials synthesis, electron microscopy and introductory biotechnology techniques are presented. This course will provide students training in laboratory technique and data handling. Recommended background: CH 1010 or equivalent.

ME 2550. ATMOSPHERIC AND SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

This course introduces the ambient atmospheric and space environments encountered by aerospace vehicles. Topics include: the sun and solar activity; the solar wind; planetary magnetospheres; planetary atmospheres; radiation environments; galactic cosmic rays; meteoroids; and space debris. Recommended background: mechanics (PH1110 / 1111 or equivalent), electromagnetism (PH 1120 / 1121 or equivalent), and ordinary differential equations (MA 2051 or equivalent).

ME 2713. ASTRONAUTICS

Cat. I An introductory course that covers the fundamentals of space flight, spacecraft trajectory analysis and mission design. Topics studied: orbital mechanics; geocentric orbits and trajectories; interplanetary transfers; ambient space environments for geocentric orbits and interplanetary transfers; introduction to spacecraft and mission design. Recommended background: dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

ME 2820. MATERIALS PROCESSING

Cat. I An introduction to material processing in manufacturing. This course provides important background for anyone interested in manufacturing, design engineering design, sales, or management. Processing of polymers, ceramics, metals and composites is discussed. Processes covered include: rolling, injection molding, forging, powder metallurgy, joining and machining. The relationships between materials, processes, processing parameters and the properties of manufactured parts are developed. During the course the students should develop the ability to choose materials, processes, and processing parameters for designing manufacturing procedures to take a prototype part to production. Recommended background: ME 1800 Materials Selection and Manufacturing Processes, and ES 2001 Introduction to Materials Science.

ME 3310. KINEMATICS OF MECHANISMS

Cat. I An introduction to the synthesis and analysis of linkages, cams and gear trains is presented. The design process is introduced and used to solve unstructured design problems in linkage and cam design. Algebraic and graphical techniques to analyze the displacement, velocity and acceleration of linkages and cams are developed. Computer programs for the design and analysis of linkages are used by students. Results of student design projects are presented in professional engineering reports. Recommended background: Ordinary Differential Equations (MA 2051), statics (ES 2501), dynamics (ES 2503).

ME 3311. DYNAMICS OF MECHANISMS AND MACHINES

This course provides an in-depth study of forces in dynamic systems. Dynamic force analysis is developed using matrix methods. Computer programs are used to solve the sets of simultaneous equations derived by students for realistic, unstructured design problems. Inertial and shaking forces, elementary mechanical vibrations, torque-time functions, rotational and reciprocating balance and cam dynamics are covered using the internal combustion engine as a design example. Students execute unstructured design projects and prepare professional engineering reports on the results. Computers are used extensively to solve the dynamic equations. Recommended background: Ordinary Differential Equations (MA 2051), statics (ES 2501), dynamics (ES 2503), kinematics (ME 3310), linear algebra.

ME 3320. DESIGN OF MACHINE ELEMENTS

Cat. I This is an introductory course in mechanical design analysis, and it examines stress and fatigue in many machine elements. Common machine elements are studied and methods of selection and design are related to the associated hardware. Topics covered include: combined stresses, fatigue analysis, design of shafts, springs, gears, bearings and miscellaneous machine elements. Recommended background: mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503), materials (ME 1800, ME 2820), computer programming (CS 1101 or CS 1102).

ME 3410. COMPRESSIBLE FLUID DYNAMICS

Cat. I In this course, students are introduced to various compressibility phenomena such as compression (shock) and expansion waves. Conservation laws and thermodynamic principles are applied to the description of flows in which compressibility effects are significant. One-dimensional models are applied to analysis of flow in variable area ducts, normal and oblique shock waves, expansion waves, and flows with friction and heat addition. Numerous applications from engineering are investigated including supersonic inlets, rocket nozzles, supersonic wind tunnels, gas delivery systems, and afterburning jet engines. Recommended background: thermodynamics (ES 3001, CH 3510 or equivalent), fluid dynamics (ES 3004 or equivalent).

ME 3501. ELEMENTARY CONTINUUM MECHANICS

In typical mathematics courses, students learn principles and techniques by solving many short and specially prepared problems. They rarely gain experience in formulating and solving mathematical equations that apply to real life engineering problems. This course will give students this type of applied mathematical experience. The course emphasizes the application of basic laws of nature as they apply to differential elements which lead to differential equations that need to be solved; all of these ideas are used in higher level engineering science courses such as fluid mechanics, heat transfer, elasticity, etc. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the physical concepts in a problem, selecting appropriate differential elements, developing differential equations, and finding ways to solve these equations. Limitations on the mathematical solutions due to assumptions made will be considered. Recommended background: Ordinary Differential Equations (MA 2051), statics (ES 2501), dynamics (ES 2503).

ME 3506. REHABILITATION ENGINEERING

This project based design course focuses on the design and use of devices to aid persons with disabilities. Human factors and ergonomics are integrated into all phases of the design process with particular emphasis on the user interface. Topics include: defining the problem, developing design specifications, development of preliminary designs, selecting, realization and evaluation of a final design. Students will also learn how physical and cognitive parameters, safety, economics, reliability and aesthetics need to be incorporated into the design process. Recommended background: mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503), design (ME 2300), materials (ME 1800) and electrical engineering (ECE 2010).

ME 3602. INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUIDS

Cat. I This course covers inviscid and viscous incompressible fluid dynamics at an intermediate level. Topics include: fluid kinematics and deformation; integral conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy for finite systems and control volumes; differential conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy; the Navier-Stokes equations and solution methods; the incompressible Euler equations and Bernoulli?s equation; the streamfunction and the velocity potential; incompressible, inviscid, irrotational flow theory and solution methodology; elementary potential flows, the superposition principle and its applications to flows over solid bodies; two-dimensional incompressible, viscous boundary layer, Prandtl?s theory, the Blasius solution and it?s application; other analytical solutions for two-dimensional viscous and inviscid incompressible channel flows. Recommended background: thermodynamics (ES 3001, CH 3510 or equivalent), fluid dynamics (ES 3004 or equivalent).

ME 3703. INTRODUCTION TO CONTROL OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

Cat. I The course introduces the mathematical modeling and control of dynamical systems found in aerospace and mechanical engineering applications. Topics include: introduction to feedback control analysis and synthesis of linear dynamic systems; transient response analysis of first and second order systems (thermal, pneumatic, hydraulic, and mechanical); introduction to state-space modeling and representation of control systems; linearization of nonlinear systems; stability analysis using Routh?s criterion and Lyapunov methods; system analysis using frequency response methods; introduction to the design of controlers in time and frequency domain. The analysis and design will be accomplished with Matlab/Simulink? software. Recommended background: ordinary differential equations (MA 2051 or equivalent), dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201, PH 2202 or equivalent), fluid dynamics (ES3004, AE/ME 3602 or equivalent), electricity and magnetism (PH 1120 or PH 1121 or equivalent)

ME 3711. AERODYNAMICS

Cat. I This course introduces students to the aerodynamics of airfoils, wings, and aircraft in the subsonic and supersonic regimes. Topics covered include: prediction of aerodynamic forces (lift, drag) and moments, dynamic similarity, experimental techniques in aerodynamics, Kutta-Joukowski theorem, circulation, thin airfoil theory, panel methods, finite wing theory, subsonic compressible flow over airfoils, linearized supersonic flow, and viscous flow over airfoils. Recommended background: incompressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3602 or equivalent).

ME 3712. AEROSPACE STRUCTURES

Cat. I This is a course in solid mechanics that covers stress analysis of aerospace structures. It begins with an overview of stress, strain, three-dimensional elasticity theory, and stress-strain relations for an isotropic materials. Applied topics include general torsion of solid noncircular cross sections, torsion of thin walled multi-celled members, bidirectional bending of unsymmetric cross sections, flexural shear flow in and shear center of thin walled multi-celled members, and buckling and stability of columns. Recommended background: Stress Analysis (ES 2502 or equivalent.)

ME 3820. COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING

Cat. I This introductory course in modern control systems will give students an understanding of the basic techniques, and the range of equipment used in most computer controlled manufacturing operations. The class work is reinforced by hands-on laboratories in the Robotics/CAM lab. Modeling and analysis of machining processes, and applications of PLC (programmable logic control) are included. Class topics include: Manufacturing Automation, Microcomputers for Process Monitoring and Control, Computer Numerical Control, Switching Theory and Ladder Logic, Transducers and Signal Conditioning, and Closed Loop Digital Control. The laboratories allow students to program and implement several types of the controllers, and will provide an introduction to the topic of industrial robotics. Recommended background: manufacturing (ME 1800), materials processing (ME 2820), elementary computer/logic device programming.

ME 3901. ENGINEERING EXPERIMENTATION

Cat. I A course designed to develop analytical and experimental skills in modern engineering measurement methods, based on electronic instrumentation and computer-based data acquisition systems. The lectures are concerned with the engineering analysis and design as well as the principles of instrumentation, whereas the laboratory periods afford the student an opportunity to use modern devices in actual experiments. Lecture topics include: review of engineering fundamentals and, among others, discussions of standards, measurement and sensing devices, experiment planning, data acquisition, analysis of experimental data, and report writing. Laboratory experiments address both mechanical and thermal systems and instrumentation in either traditional mechanical engineering (heat transfer, flow measurement/visualization, force/torque/strain measurement, motion/vibration measurement) or materials engineering (temperature and pressure measurements in materials processing, measurement of strain and position in mechanical testing of materials). Each year students will be notified which type of experiments will be used in each term offering. Students may also consult with their academic advisor or the Mechanical Engineering department office. Recommended background: mathematics (MA 2051), thermo-fluids (ES 3001, ES 3003, ES 3004), mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503), materials (ES 2001).

ME 4320. ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN

Cat. I This course integrates students? background in ME in a one-term design project that is usually taken from a local company. Students must organize themselves and the project to successfully realize a product that meets customer needs. Activities include problem definition, design analysis, mathematical modelling, CAD modelling, manufacturing, testing, liaison to vendors, customer relations, marketing, technical management, purchasing, report writing, and oral presentations. Recommended background: mechanisms (ME 3310, ME 3311), stress analysis (ES 3502), design (ME 3320), thermo-fluids (ES 3001, ES 3003, ES 3004), materials (ES 2001), manufacturing (ME 1800).

ME 4322. MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS

Cat. I This course introduces students to the modeling and analysis of mechatronic systems. Creation of dynamic models and analysis of model response using the bond graph modeling language are emphasized. Lecture topics include energy storage and dissipation elements, transducers, transformers, formulation of equations for dynamic systems, time response of linear systems, and system control through open and closed feedback loops. Computers are used extensively for system modeling, analysis, and control. Hands-on projects will include the reverse engineering and modeling of various physical systems. Physical models may sometimes also be built and tested. Recommended background: mathematics (MA 2051, MA 2071), fluids (ES 3004), thermodynamics (ES 3001), mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2503).

ME 4429. THERMOFLUID APPLICATION AND DESIGN

This course integrates thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer through the use of design projects involving modern technologies, such as electronic cooling, vapor compression power and refrigeration cycles. Activities include problem definition, design creation and analysis, mathematical modeling, cost analysis and optimization. Recommended background: Knowledge in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and introduction to design (ES 3001, ES 3004 and ES 3003 or equivalent).

ME 4430. INTEGRATED THERMOMECHANICAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS

Current state-of-the-art computer based methodologies used in the design and analysis of thermomechanical systems will be presented and illustrated by selected laboratory demonstrations, and used in projects. Projects will include thermal, mechanical, electronic, and photonic loads of steady state and dynamic nature and will integrate design, analysis, and testing. Students will prepare a technical report and present their results. Topics will include, but not be limited to, thermomechanics of fiber optic telecommunication cables, high-energy beam interactions with materials, shape memory alloys, microelectronics, MEMS and mechatronics. Recommended background: MA 2051, ES 2001, ES 2502, ES 3003, ME 3901, and an introduction to design.

ME 4504. BIOMECHANICS

This course emphasizes the applications of mechanics to describe the material properties of living tissues. It is concerned with the description and measurements of these properties as related to their physiological functions. Emphasis on the interrelationship between biomechanics and physiology in medicine, surgery, body injury and prostheses. Topics covered include: review of basic mechanics, stress, strain, constitutive equations and the field equations, viscoelastic behavior, and models of material behavior. The measurement and characterization of properties of tendons, skin, muscles and bone. Biomechanics as related to body injury and the design of prosthetic devices. Recommended background: mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503, ME 3501), mathematics (MA 2051).

ME 4505. ADVANCED DYNAMICS

This course provides natural continuation of the course ES 2503 (Introduction to Dynamic Systems). The main extension is advanced three-dimensional kinematics and dynamics, with illustrations of application to engineering problems. In particular a variety of inherently 3D phenomena is described whereby a rigid body rotates around an axis, which itself may rotate (gyroscopic effects). A set of new topics includes, among others, Introduction into Rotordynamics (bringing in concept of critical rotation speed); swings-effect and its use in engineering with computer-based miniproject; and brief introduction to stability analysis. While the main part of the course is based on direct use of the Newton?s Laws, a brief introduction into Analytical Mechanics is presented as an alternative approach to Dynamics. The corresponding part of the course includes principle of virtual work and Lagrange equations. Recommended background: Introduction to Dynamic Systems (ES-2503) The course will be offered in 2014-2015 and in alternating years thereafter.

ME 4506. MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

Cat. I This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of mechanical vibrations, which are important for design and analysis of mechanical and structural systems subjected to time-varying loads. The objective of the course is to expose the students to mathematical modeling and analysis of such systems . Topics covered include: formulation of the equations of motion using Newton?s Laws, D?Alembert?s Principle and energy methods; prediction of natural frequency for single-degree-of-freedom systems; modeling stiffness characteristics, damping and other vibrational properties of mechanical systems; basic solution techniques by frequency response analysis and convolution integral methods. Examples may include analysis and design for transient passage through resonance; analysis and design of vibration measurement devices; introductory rotordynamics. The course is mainly focused on analysis of single-degree-of-freedom systems, however a basic introduction into multidegree- of-freedom systems is also presented. Computer-based project may be suggested. Recommended background: Ordinary Differential Equations (MA 2501), Statics (ES 2501), Dynamics (ES 2503).

ME 4512. INTRODUCTION TO THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

Cat. I This course serves as an introduction to finite element analysis (FEA) for stress analysis problems. Finite element equations are developed for several element types from stiffness and energy approaches and used to solve simple problems. Element types considered include spring, truss, beam, two-dimensional (plane stress/strain and axisymmetric solid), three-dimensional and plates. Stress concentrations, static failures, and fatigue failures are considered for each element type. Emphasis will be placed on knowing the behavior and usage of each element type, being able to select a suitable finite element model for a given problem, and being able to interpret and evaluate the solution quality. A commercial, general-purpose finite element computer program is used to solve problems that are more complex. Projects are used to introduce the use of FEA in the iterative design process. Recommended background: Mathematics (MA 2051, MA 2071), Mechanics (ES 2501 & ES 2502 or CE 2000 & CE 2001).

ME 4606. BIOFLUIDS

This course emphasizes the applications of fluid mechanics to biological problems. The course concentrates primarily on the human circulatory and respiratory systems. Topics covered include: blood flow in the heart, arteries, veins and microcirculation and air flow in the lungs and airways. Mass transfer across the walls of these systems is also presented. Recommended background: continuum mechanics (ME 3501), fluids (ES 3004).

ME 4710. GAS TURBINES FOR PROPULSION AND POWER GENERATION

Cat. I This course provides a study of open-cycle and closed-cycle gas turbines. Topics covered include: thermodynamic cycles and fluid dynamics of airbreathing gas turbines (turbojets, turbofans, turboprops), ramjets, and scramjets; thermodynamic cycles and fluid dynamics of closed-cycle gas turbines. Performance of specific engine components such as inlets, combustors, nozzles, as well as axial compressors and turbines will be addressed. Recommended background: compressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3410 or equivalent).

ME 4713. SPACECRAFT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

Cat. I. The course covers broad topics in spacecraft attitude dynamics, stability and control. The course includes a review of particle and two-body dynamics and introduction to rigid body dynamics. Orbital and attitude maneuvers are presented. Attitude control devices and momentum exchange techniques such as spinners, dual spinners, gravity gradient, and geomagnetic torques are presented. Attitude sensors/actuators are presented and the attitude control problem is introduced. Gyroscopic instruments are introduced and demonstrated in the laboratory. Open-loop stability analysis for a variety of equilibrium conditions is discussed. Control using momentum exchange and mass expulsion (thrusters) devices is discussed. Recommended background: astronautics (ME 2713 or equivalent), dynamics (ES 2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

ME 4718. ADVANCED MATERIALS WITH AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS

Cat. I This course covers topics on the design, fabrication and behavior of advanced materials used in structural and propulsion components of aerospace vehicles. The design, fabrication, and properties of polymer, metal and ceramic matrix composites used in aerospace structures are presented. The fabrication and behavior of aluminum and titanium alloys used in propulsion components as well as the processing and performance of Nickel-based superalloys are also presented. The fundamentals of coatings for high temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and thermal protection are introduced. Recommended background: Introduction to Materials Science (ES 2001), Stress Analysis (ES 2502) or equivalent.

ME 4719. ROCKET PROPULSION

Cat. I This course provides a study of rocket propulsion systems for launch vehicles and spacecraft. Dynamics, performance and optimization of rocket-propelled vehicles are presented. Performance and component analysis of chemical and electric propulsion systems are covered including thermochemistry of bipropellant and monopropellant thrusters. Additional topics may include advanced propulsion concepts and propellant storage and feed systems. Recommended background: compressible fluid dynamics (AE/ME 3410 or equivalent).

ME 4723. AIRCRAFT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

Cat. I The goal of this course is for students to develop, analyze, and utilize models of aircraft dynamics, and to study various aircraft control systems. Topics include: review of linear systems, longitudinal and lateral flight dynamics, simulation methodologies, natural modes of motion, static and dynamic aircraft stability, and aircraft control systems (such as autopilot design, flight path control, and automatic landing). Other topics may include: vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) vehicles and rotorcraft. Recommended background: dynamics (ES2503, PH 2201 or equivalent).

ME 4733. GUIDANCE, NAVIGATION AND COMMUNICATION

Cat. I This course broadly covers methods and current enabling technologies in the analysis, synthesis and practice of aerospace guidance, navigation, and communication and information systems. Topics covered include: position fixing and celestial navigation with redundant measurements, recursive navigation, and Kalman filtering; inertial navigation systems, global position systems, and Doppler navigation; orbit determination; atmospheric re-entry; communication architectures, data rates, and communication link design; tropospheric and ionospheric effects on radio-wave propagation; pursuit guidance and ballistic flight. Recommended background: Controls (AE/ME 3703, ES 3011 or equivalent).

ME 4770. AIRCRAFT DESIGN

Cat. I This course introduces students to design of aircraft systems. Students complete a conceptual design of an aircraft in a term-long project. Students are exposed to the aircraft design process, and must establish design specifications, develop and analyze alternative designs, and optimize their designs to meet mission requirements. Students work together in teams to apply material learned in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials, propulsion, stability and control, and flight mechanics and maneuvers to the preliminary design of an aircraft. The project requirements are selected to reflect real-life aircraft mission requirements, and teams are required to design systems which incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. The teams present their design in a final report and oral presentation. Recommended background: fluid dynamics (ME 3410, ME 3602 or equivalent), subsonic aerodynamics (ME 3711 or equivalent), aerospace structures (ME 3712 or equivalent), airbreathing propulsion (ME 4710 or equivalent), aircraft dynamics and control (AE/ME 4723 or equivalent).

ME 4771. SPACECRAFT AND MISSION DESIGN

Cat. I This course introduces students to design of spacecraft and missions. Students are introduced to the process of designing a spacecraft and major subsystems to meet a specific set of objectives or needs. In addition, students will learn about different spacecraft subsystems and what factors drive their design. Particular emphasis is given to propulsion, power, attitude control, structural and thermal control subsystems. Students work together in teams to apply material learned in the areas of orbital mechanics, space environments, attitude determination and control, space structures, and propulsion to the preliminary design of a spacecraft and mission. The project requirements are selected to reflect real-life missions, and teams are required to design systems which incorporate appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. The teams present their design in a final report and oral presentation. Recommended background: astronautics (AE/ME 2713 or equivalent), rocket propulsion (AE/ME 4719 or equivalent), spacecraft dynamics and control (AE\ME 4713 or equivalent).

ME 4810. AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS AND PROCESS DESIGN

This course focuses on materials used in the automotive industry. Students complete a term-long project that integrates design, materials selection and processing considerations. Activities include: problem definition, development of design specifications, development and analysis of alternative designs, conceptual designs and materials and process selection. Students will consider cost, and environmental impact of alternative material choices. Students will present their results in intermediate and final design reviews. Recommended background: materials science (ES 2001), stress analysis (ES 2502), or equivalent.

ME 4813. CERAMICS AND GLASSES FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

This course develops an understanding of the processing, structure, property, performance relationships in crystalline and vitreous ceramics. The topics covered include crystal structure, glassy structure, phase diagrams, microstructures, mechanical properties, optical properties, thermal properties, and materials selection for ceramic materials. In addition the methods for processing ceramics for a variety of products will be included. Recommended Background: ES 2001 or equivalent.

ME 4814. BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS

This course discusses various aspects pertaining to the selection, processing, testing (in vitro and in vivo) and performance of biomedical materials. The biocompatibility and surgical applicability of metallic, polymeric and ceramic implants and prosthetic devices are discussed. The physico-chemical interactions between the implant material and the physiological environment will be described. The use of biomaterials in maxillofacial, orthopedic, dental, ophthalmic and neuromuscular applications is presented. (Recommended background: BB 3101 or equivalent introduction to human anatomy, ES 2001 or equivalent introduction to materials science and engineering.)

ME 4815. INDUSTRIAL ROBOTICS

Cat. I This course introduces students to robotics within manufacturing systems. Topics include: classification of robots, robot kinematics, motion generation and transmission, end effectors, motion accuracy, sensors, robot control and automation. This course is a combination of lecture, laboratory and project work, and utilizes industrial robots. Through the laboratory work, students will become familiar with robotic programming (using a robotic programming language VAL II) and the robotic teaching mode. The experimental component of the laboratory exercise measures the motion and positioning capabilities of robots as a function of several robotic variables and levels, and it includes the use of experimental design techniques and analysis of variance. Recommended background: manufacturing (ME 1800), kinematics (ME 3310), control (ES 3011), and computer programming.

ME 4821. PLASTICS

This course develops the processing, structure, property, performance relationships in plastic materials. The topics covered include polymerization processes, chain structure and configuration, molecular weights and distributions, amorphous and crystalline states and glass-rubber transition. The principles of various processing techniques including injection molding, extrusion, blow molding, thermoforming and calendaring will be discussed. The physical and mechanical properties of polymers and polymer melts will be described with specific attention to rheology and viscoelasticity. Pertinent issues related to environmental degradation and recyclability will be highlighted. Recommended Background: ES 2001 or equivalent.

ME 4832. CORROSION AND CORROSION CONTROL

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the different forms of corrosion and the fundamentals of oxidation and electro-chemical corrosion. Topics covered include: corrosion principles, environmental effects, metallurgical aspects, galvanic corrosion, crevice corrosion, pitting, intergranular corrosion, erosion corrosion, stress corrosion, cracking and hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion testing, corrosion prevention, oxidation and other high-temperature metal-gas reactions. Recommended background: materials (ES 2001).

ME 4840. PHYSICAL METALLURGY

Cat. I Fundamental relationships between the structure and properties of engineering materials are studied. Principles of diffusion and phase transformation are applied to the strengthening of commercial alloy systems. Role of crystal lattice defects on material properties and fracture are presented. Strongly recommended as a senior-graduate level course for students interested in pursuing a graduate program in materials or materials engineering at WPI, or other schools. Recommended background: materials (ES 2001, ME 2820).

ME 4860. FOOD ENGINEERING

An introductory course on the structure, processing, and properties of food. Topics covered include: food structure and rheology, plant and animal tissues, texture, glass transition, gels, emulsions, micelles, food additives, food coloring, starches, baked goods, mechanical properties, elasticity, viscoelastic nature of food products, characteristics of food powders, fat eutectics, freezing and cooking of food, manufacturing processes, cereal processing, chocolate manufacture, microbial growth, fermentation, transport phenomena in food processing, kinetics, preserving and packaging of food, testing of food. Recommended Background: ES 2001 or equivalent.

ME 4875. INTRODUCTION TO NANOMATERIALS AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Cat. I This course introduces students to current developments in nanoscale science and technology. The current advance of materials and devices constituting of building blocks of metals, semiconductors, ceramics or polymers that are nanometer size (1-100 nm) are reviewed. The profound implications for technology and science of this research field are discussed. The differences of the properties of matter on the nanometer scale from those on the macroscopic scale due to the size confinement, predominance of interfacial phenomena and quantum mechanics are studied. The main issues and techniques relevant to science and technologies on the nanometer scale are considered. New developments in this field and future perspectives are presented. Topics covered include: fabrication of nanoscale structures, characterization at nanoscale, molecular electronics, nanoscale mechanics, new architecture, nano-optics and societal impacts. Recommended background: ES 2001 Introduction to Materials or equivalent.

 
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