Supplemental Course Information

Special Topics Courses for ECE

 

The following information is provided as a supplement to the Graduate Course Catalog.

 

ECE 529B. Analog Circuits and Intuition

The ability to see the simplicity in a complex design problem is a skill that is not usually taught in engineering classes. Some engineers, when faced with design problems, immediately fill up pages and pages of calculations, or do complex circuit simulations or finite-element analyses.   One problem with this approach is that if you get an answer, you do not know if it is correct unless you have an intuitive “feel” for what the answer should be. The application of some simple rules of thumb and design techniques is a possible first step to developing intuition into the behavior of complex electrical systems. This course outlines some ways of thinking about analog circuits and systems that are intended will help to develop intuition and guide design. The lectures are a mixture of instructional sessions covering new background material, and design case studies. (Prerequisites: Undergraduate background in device physics, microelectronics, control systems, electromagnetism)  

ECE 529C. Noise in Analog and Mixed Signal Circuits and Systems

This course covers the application of probabilistic techniques to the analysis of noise in analog and mixed signal circuits and systems, as well as the design of systems to meet required noise performance. The course begins with a review of basic and advanced probability concepts: probability, random variables, stochastic processes, power spectral density, and autocorrelation. This is followed by a description of fundamental noise mechanisms (e.g. thermal noise, shot noise) and noise models at the device level for the MOSFET and bipolar transistors. Modeling of noise at the amplifier and system level, as well as noise simulation in SPICE, is also covered. These noise analysis techniques are then applied to the design of low noise amplifiers, for both discrete and integrated circuit applications. Also addressed are interference mechanisms that affect measured noise performance, including crosstalk, power supply induced noise, and ground loops. The course concludes with optional advanced topics, possibly including 1/f noise, phase noise and jitter in oscillators, and phase-locked loops (PLL) systems. (Prerequisite: Undergraduate courses in probability, signals and systems, analog microelectronics. ECE 502 helpful but not essential.)

ECE 529N. Special Topics in Nanophotonics

This course covers topics in nanophotonics and plasmonics. Material to be covered includes analytical and computational methods for calculating electromagnetic fields and propagation in complex nanophotonic geometries on the nano and microscale. Methods include the finite difference time domain method, boundary element methods, Green's functions methods, and finite element methods.

Recommended background: Undergraduate fields (such as covered in ECE2112).

Suggested background: Numerical methods (such as covered in MA 3457), vector calculus (such as covered in MA 2251).

ECE 539A. Real Time DSP

The student will develop in-depth understanding of the architecture and basic operation of fixed- and floating- point digital signal processors (DSPs). The student will realize computationally efficient algorithms, such as FIR/IIR digital filters, FFTs, and fast convolution, on a DSP platform (Texas Instruments Digital Starter Kit- TMS320C6713),. Collaterally the student will learn to optimize DSP code by techniques such as software pipelining, to perform worst-case timing analysis, and to evaluate system performance both theoretically and experimentally.

ECE 539D. Applied Bioelectric Signal Analysis

This course provides a broad introduction to biomedical signal analysis, particularly tailored to students who have no prior background in biomedicine.  The course will concentrate on signal analysis of the electrical activity of the human body, providing sufficient physiologic background for study of the relevant organ systems.  System-level engineering models of the electrical activity of the heart, skeletal muscles and brain will be presented and actual biomedical signals will be analyzed.  Digital signal processing algorithms for analysis of biomedical signals will be studied extensively using MATLAB.  Specific signal processing topics may include: use of muscle electrical activity to command powered prostheses and/or guide rehabilitation therapy; design of filters to reject motion artifact, noise and interference; monitoring (e.g., detection and classification) of heart, brain and muscle electrical impulses; and non-invasive estimation of muscle activation level. Students may not receive credit for both ECE 443X and ECE 539D. (Prerequisites: Undergraduate (or graduate) course in digital signal processing, experience with MATLAB and a course in probability and/or statistics.)

ECE 539K. Waves & Devices

This is a graduate-level power electronics course, covering power electronic systems, device physics, rectifiers, switching power converters (DC/DC and resonant), control issues, practical design issues such as snubbers, gate drives, and thermal design, and magnetic design. The focus is on real-world, approximate design techniques, case studies, and intuitive methods, with special emphasis on switching DC/DC converters. Circuit simulations will be used when necessary. (Prerequisites: Basic background in device physics, transistor amplifier and operational amplifier design. Control systems. Electromagnetism. Access to web searching, MATLAB and PSPICE simulation tools. It is also assumed that the students understand the basics of Bode plots, pole-zero analysis, and Laplace transforms.)

ECE 539M. Introduction to Antenna Design

This course is aimed to study the following major topics: radiation (introduction to Maxwell’s equations and their solutions), dipole (monopole) antennas, loop antennas, antenna reflectors, horn and notch antennas, aperture antennas, microstrip antennas. Topics of interest also include small antennas and antenna arrays. Special attention is paid to antenna simulation software. This course is intended for graduate and senior-level undergraduate students.   (Prerequisites: Undergraduate background in electromagnetics, College MATLAB, Differential and integral calculus.)

ECE 539N. Introduction to Computational Electromagnetics and High-Frequency Circuit Modeling

This course is intended for graduate and senior-level undergraduate students. Existing numerical methods and major software packages are reviewed. The classic Method of Moments (MoM) for static inductance and capacitance calculations and the MoM for full-wave metal-antenna modeling are introduced. The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method for electric circuit modeling (Euler method, Runge-Kutta methods, stability, and solution of RC, RL, and RLC circuits, SPICE versus FDTD) is studied next. 1D and 2D versions of FDTD are applied to transmission line modeling. Theory of 3D FDTD (Yee grid and finite differences, material properties, model of a small dipole antenna, model of a small coil antenna, model of an impressed electric field or voltage source, boundary conditions) is introduced. This study is applied to wireless communications, localization and sensing, in particular to Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs). All numerical methods are programmed in MATLAB. (Prerequisites: College MATLAB, differential and integral calculus.)

ECE539W/CS525W. Wireless Access and Localization

This course covers the systems engineering aspects of wireless access networks and their relation to localization techniques for Electrical Engineering, Computer Science or other graduate students interested in this field.  The course provides a comprehensive overview of wireless access techniques used in wide, local and personal area networks and relates these technologies to emerging localization techniques using cellular, UWB, WiFi, and other signals of opportunity used in emerging smart devices such as iPhone.   The emphasis of the wireless access methods is on comparative performance evaluation and system description of TDMA, CDMA and OFDM transmission and distributed contention and assigned access methods. The emphasis on localization is on comparative performance evaluation of different algorithms in multipath rich indoor and urban areas.  (Prerequisite: ECE506/CS513 or equivalent familiarity with the local and wide area networks.)  

ECE 549. Selected Topics in Control

Courses in this group are devoted to the study of advanced topics in the formulation and solution of theoretical or practical problems in modern control.

ECE 5500 (formerly ECE 559A). Introduction to Power Systems Engineering

This graduate course introduces the fundamentals of Electric Power Systems Engineering. Topics include a review of AC circuit analysis and then introduce transmission line parameter calculation, symmetrical component analysis, transformer and load modeling, symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault analysis, power flow, and power systems stability. (Prerequisites: Knowledge of circuit analysis, basic calculus and differential equations, elementary matrix analysis and basic computer programming.)

ECE 5510 (formerly ECE 559B). Fundamentals of Power Quality

This graduate course aims to provide tools and techniques needed to analyze and quantify power quality phenomena in power systems. It addresses a set of analytical and practical problems, with a special emphasis on a sound theoretical treatment of relevant questions. Homework problems will be assigned as necessary.

ECE 5511 (formerly ECE 559C). Transients in Power Systems

This graduate-level course introduces the student to the effects of electromagnetic transients in distribution systems. Topics include transient analysis, lightning and switching surges, mechanisms of transient generation, insulation coordination, grounding, surge protection devices, and shielding. (Prerequisites: Introduction to Power Systems Engineering.)

ECE 5512 (formerly ECE 559E). Electromechanical Energy Conversion

This graduate-level course will further explore alternating current circuits, three phase circuits, basics of electromagnetic field theory, magnetic circuits, inductance, and electromechanical energy conversion. Topics also include ideal transformer, iron-core transformer, voltage regulation, efficiency equivalent circuit, and three phase  transformers. Induction machine construction, equivalent circuit, torque speed characteristics,   and single phase motors, synchronous machine construction, equivalent circuit, power  relationships phasor diagrams, and synchronous motors will be covered. Direct current machine construction, types, efficiency, power flow diagram, and external characteristics will be discussed.

ECE 5520 (formerly ECE 559H). Power System Protection and Control

This 3 credit graduate-level course seeks to provide an understanding of how interconnected power systems and their components are protected from abnormal events such as faults (short circuits), over-voltages, off-nominal frequency and unbalanced phase conditions. This subject is presented from a theoretical viewpoint, however, many practical examples and applications are included that emphasize the limitations of existing protective equipment. Course content is not specific to any particular manufacturer’s equipment. The course begins with a brief review of power system operation, three-phase system calculations and the representation (modeling) of power system elements. The modeling of current transformers under steady-state and transient conditions is presented with emphasis on the impact on protective devices. A unit on system grounding and its impact on protective device operation are included. Course emphasis then shifts to protective devices and their principles of operation. Both electromechanical and numeric relay designs are covered. The final course segments cover specific applications such as pilot protection of transmission lines, generator protection and transformer protection. (Prerequisite: ECE559A: Introduction to Power System Engineering or equivalent experienced.)

ECE 5521 (formerly ECE 559J). Fundamentals of Protective Relaying

This graduate-level course is the first of a two course sequence that covers both the principles and practices of power system protective relaying. The course seeks to provide an understanding of how interconnected power systems and their components are protected from abnormal events such as faults (short circuits), over-voltages, off-nominal frequency and unbalanced phase conditions. This subject is presented from a theoretical viewpoint, however, many practical examples are included that emphasize the limitations of existing protective equipment. Course content is not specific to any particular manufacturer’s equipment. The course begins with a brief review of the nature of power system operation, power system faults and other abnormal conditions. The nature and objectives of protective relaying are covered with emphasis on how the power system can be monitored to detect abnormal conditions. The computational tools needed to analyze system operation and apply protective relaying are covered next, including the per-unit system, phasors and symmetrical components. The modeling of current transformers under steady-state and transient conditions is presented with emphasis on the impact on protective devices. A unit on system grounding and its impact on protective device operation is included. Course emphasis then shifts to protective devices and their principles of operation. Both electromechanical and numeric relay designs are covered. (Prerequisite: To be familiar with phasors, derivatives, transfer functions, poles and zeros, block diagram and the notion of feedback with basic understanding power system analysis or similar background recommended. ECE559A: Introduction to Power System Engineering or equivalent background experience is suggested. Note: Credit cannot be awarded for this course if ECE 559H Power System Protection and Control has already been taken. )

ECE 5522 (formerly ECE 559K). Advanced Applications in Protective Relaying

This graduate-level course covers advanced topics in the principles and practices of power system protective relaying. The course seeks to provide an understanding of how protective relays are applied to protect power system components. While the subject is presented from a theoretical viewpoint, many practical examples are included. Examples specific to both new installations and existing, older facilities will be included. Course content is not specific to any particular manufacturer’s equipment. The course begins with applications of protective devices to generators. This will include distributed generation as well as wind-turbine and inverter-connected sources. Transformer protection is covered next, including application procedures for older, electromechanical relays as well as modern numeric relay designs. A unit on bus protection is covered next, including all typical high-speed and time backup bus protection schemes. Transmission line and distribution feeder protection is covered in detail including both conventional and communications-assisted schemes. The course ends with a unit on other protection applications such as under frequency load shedding, reclosing and out-of-step relaying. (Prerequisite: ECE 559J- Fundamental of Protective Relaying. Note: Credit cannot be awarded for this course if ECE 559H Power System Protection and Control has already been taken.)

ECE 5523 (formerly ECE 559M). Power Systems Dynamics

This graduate-level course is concerned with modeling, analyzing and mitigating power system stability and control problems. The course seeks to provide an understanding of the electromechanical dynamics of the interconnected electric power grid. This subject is presented from a theoretical viewpoint; however, many practical examples are included. The course begins with a description of the physics of the power system, frequency regulation during “steady-state” operation, dynamic characteristics of modern power systems, a review of feedback control systems, power system frequency regulation, and a review of protective relaying. This is followed by material on synchronous machine theory and modeling. Simulation of power system dynamic response, small signal stability, transient stability analysis using SIMULINK and effects of non-traditional power sources on systems dynamics will also be covered. Power system stabilizers, load modeling and under frequency load shedding are covered in the final lectures. (Prerequisite: Familiarity with the basics of Laplace Transforms, derivatives, transfer functions, poles and zeros, block diagram and the notion of feedback with basic understanding power system analysis topics recommended. ECE559A- Introduction to Power System Engineering and ECE559C-Transients in Power Systems or equivalent background experience is suggested.)

ECE 5530 (formerly ECE 559F). Fundamentals of Power Distribution

This graduate-level course introduces the fundamentals of power distribution systems, apparatus, and practices suited to new and experienced utility distribution engineers. Topics include distribution system designs, transformers and connections, practical aspects of apparatus and protection, principles of device coordination, grounding, voltage control, and power quality. (Prerequisites: Prior courses in magnetism and three-phase circuits. An electric machines course would be recommended.)

ECE 5531 (formerly ECE 559G). Power System Operation and Planning

This graduate-level course deals with modern operation, control and planning for power systems. Topics include: Characteristics of generating units; Economic Dispatch; Unit Commitment; Effects of the transmission system on power delivery; Optimal Power Flow and Location Marginal Pricing; Power System Security; State Estimation for Power Systems; Power System Reliability Evaluation. MATLAB and the Power World Simulator software will be used both in the classroom and in some homework assignments.

ECE 5540 (formerly ECE 559L). Fundamentals of Power Transmission

A graduate-level course in engineering, analysis, and design of high-voltage power transmission systems. Developed with electric utility engineers, consultants, and technical managers in mind, it presents a broad range of topics specific to transmission system engineering. In addition to classical subjects of transmission line theory, stability, reactive compensation, transient analysis, and protection systems, some specialized topics are introduced. These include UHV transmission, transmission planning, static compensation, and a full chapter on HVDC lines and converter stations. Given the magnitude of the mechanical loadings on transmission structures and the tensions on transmission lines and insulator strings, one lecture is also devoted to   structure design, line construction, and sag analysis. The course will be challenging, and students should have a working knowledge of power system analysis, matrix algebra, elementary calculus, and differential equations. (Prerequisites: ECE559A–Introduction to Power System Analysis or pre-approval by instructor recommended. ECE559F-Fundamentals of Power Distribution and ECE559E-Electro- Mechanical Energy Conversion are suggested.)

ECE 569A. Advanced Solid-State Devices

The operation of the MOS transistor will be explored in detail, resulting in thorough understanding of observed phenomena. Device behavior will be explained using the energy band diagram and modeled for large and small signals as well as high frequencies. Sources of noise, sub threshold operation, scaling effects, and other non-ideal behavior will also be addressed. While the MOS transistor will be the focus of the course, advanced topics in bipolar transistor design may also be included. This course is intended for students pursuing study in either integrated circuit design or device physics. (Prerequisite: undergraduate analog electronics)

ECE 569B. Advanced Bi-Polar Solid State Devices

The operation of the bipolar junction transistor (BJT) will be explored in detail, resulting in thorough understanding of observed phenomena including second-order effects that limit device performance in practical integrated circuit applications.  The course begins with a review of semiconductor fundamentals and p-n junction behavior, followed by extension to the BJT, with an emphasis on effects such as temperature dependence of operation parameters, deviations from ideal behavior at high and low voltages and currents, and failure modes such as zener and avalanche breakdown.  BJT behavior will be modeled for large and small signals under DC, AC, and transient conditions. Results from theoretical hand-analysis equations will be correlated with model parameters in software tools such as SPICE. Implications of fabrication technology including device scaling in submicron processes will be considered.  This course is intended for students pursuing study in either integrated circuit design or device physics. (Prerequisite: undergraduate analog electronics).

ECE 579D. Methodologies for System Level Design and Modeling

This course discusses principles, methodologies and tools used for a modern hardware design process. Design flows and hardware languages needed for each stage of the design process are discussed. The use of transaction level modeling (TLM) for dealing with today’s complex designs is emphasized. The course starts with a discussion of the evolution of hardware design methodologies, and then discusses the use of C++ for an algorithmic description of hardware. SystemC and its TLM derivative and the role of SystemC in high-level design will be discussed. In addition, RT level interfaces and the use of SystemC for this level of design will be covered. Timed, untimed, and approximately timed TLM models and modeling schemes will be presented. Use of TLM for fast design simulation, design space exploration, and high-level synthesis will be discussed. TLM testing methods and testing of TLM based NoCs will be discussed. The course starts with a complete design project and exercises various parts of this design as methodologies, concepts, and languages are discussed. Specific topics covered are as follows: Levels of abstraction C++ for digital design SystemC RT level and above TLM methodology TLM timing aspects TLM channels TLM channels Mixed level design NoC TLM modeling System testing

ECE 579E. Embedded Core Architectures and Core-based Design

Prerequisite: Familiarity with C programming, Undergraduate knowledge of basic logic design concepts, Familiarity with a hardware description language. Notes: For students not having the necessary background, online videos will be made available to cover the prerequisites.This course introduces the concept of design with embedded components. Embedded processors, IP cores, and bus structures are discussed here. Embedded processor architectures, architectures for arithmetic processors, I/O interfacing modules, memory interfacing, and architectures related to busses and switch fabrics for putting a complete embedded system are discussed here. Topics include RT level design, arithmetic processors, ISA, CPU structure and function, addressing modes, instruction formats, memory system organization, memory mapping and hierarchies, concepts of cache, standard local buses, IO devices, pipelining, memory management, embedded processors, embedded environments, bus and switch fabrics, and embedded system implementation. An example embedded design environment including its configurable cores and processors and its bus structure will be presented in details. The course also includes a number of design projects, including design and simulation of an embedded processor, design of an arithmetic core, and design of a complete embedded system.  

ECE 579H. Modeling and Synthesis of Digital Systems Using Verilog

Prerequisite: Undergraduate knowledge of basic logic design concepts. Notes: ECE 574 may be substituted for ECE 579H. Students may not receive credit for both ECE 574 and ECE 579H. For students not having the necessary background, online videos will be made available to cover the prerequisites.Automatic design, synthesis, verification, and modeling of complex digital systems with Verilog are the main course objectives. Verilog for modeling existing circuits, as well as Verilog for design and automatic synthesis is discussed. Using Verilog for a design that consists of a hierarchy of components that include controllers, sequential and combinational parts is focused. Design description from transistor level to software interface will be discussed. Students will learn details of hardware of processor architectures and their peripherals. The course discusses module delay adjustments using Verilog path delay and distributed delay mechanisms. Testbench development and assertion verifications will be discussed. Students will learn to simulate verify, synthesize, and program their designs on an Altera development board using advanced Altera FPGAs.

ECE 579S. Computer and Network Security

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of computer security. Security architectures and their impact on computers are examined. Critical computer security aspects are identified and examined from the standpoints of both the user and the attacker: physical security, communications security, system security and operational security. Computer system vulnerabilities are examined, and mitigating approaches are identified and evaluated. Concepts and procedures for computer and computer network risk analysis are introduced. An overview of computer security statutes and case law is presented. The course emphasizes a timely approach, maintained by using recent examples of computer attacks and the resources available to deal with the rapidly changing framework of computer security. (Prerequisites: Working knowledge of computers, basic computer networks and a programming language.)

ECE 579T - Digital Systems Testing and Testable Design

This course discusses faults and fault modeling, test equipment, test generation for combinational and sequential circuits, fault simulation, memory testing, design for testability, built-in self-test techniques, boundary scan, IEEE 1149.1, and board and SoC test standards. Various fault simulation and ATPG methods including concurrent fault simulation, D-algorithm, and PODEM are discussed. Controllability and observability methods such as SCOAP for testability analysis are discussed. Various full-scan and partial scan methods are described and modeled in Verilog and tested with Verilog testbenches. BIST architectures for processor testing, memory testing and general RT level hardware testing are described, modeled in Verilog and simulated and evaluated for fault coverage. The course uses Verilog testbenches for simulating golden models, developing and evaluating test sets, and for mimicking testers.  

ECE579U. Information Security Systems and Management

This course addresses the essential elements of turning individually secure workstations and networks into a secure information system. An engineering view of how overall security can be obtained in the face of individual system elements that are only partially secure will be undertaken. Risk identification, vulnerability assessment, disaster planning and recovery, continuity of operations, and interactions of large computer networks will be discussed. Essential information on pertinent laws and regulations will be included, as will an introduction to computer forensics. A viable systems security design and supporting security policy will be developed. (Prerequisites: ECE 579S, 579T)

ECE 579V. Computer Arithmetic Circuits

Computer arithmetic is a subfield of digital computer organization. It deals with the hardware realization of arithmetic functions to support various computer architectures, as well as with arithmetic algorithms for hardware implementation. A major focus of computer arithmetic is the development of high-speed arithmetic algorithms, design of application-specific circuits to enhance the speed of numerical applications, and understanding their implementation in ASIC technology. This course consists of a detailed study of the theory, specification and design of basic arithmetic algorithms and hardware architectures used in digital systems. Topics that will be covered include number systems and representation, redundant and residue systems. Addition/subtraction circuits, multiplication, division, square-root-finding algorithms, and floating-point arithmetic systems.

ECE 579Y. Reconfigurable Computing Using FPGA’s

This course focused on the principles and applications of using FPGAs for reconfigurable computing. The key feature of reconfigurable computing is its ability to perform computations in customized hardware, while retaining much of the flexibility of a software solution. This course provides an overview of field programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture and technology. It introduces computer-aided design tools for FPGAs including synthesis, timing, placement, and routing. The course emphasizes on the techniques to analyze algorithms and to implement them on the FPGAs. It demonstrates real-time signal and data processing in customized hardware circuits. This course also covers system-on-chip design using the embedded processors inside the FPGAs. Partially reconfiguration and runtime reconfiguration design flow are also included.

RBE/ECE 595C. Robot Control: Theory and Applications

This course demonstrates the synergy between the control theory and robotics through applications and provides an in-depth coverage of control of manipulators and mobile robots. Topics include kinematic and dynamic models; trajectory and motion planning; feedback control; compliance and force control; impedance contol; control of  redundant manipulators; control of underactuated robots; adaptive robot control; integrated force and motion control; digital implementation of control laws; model identification and parameter estimation techniques. Course projects will emphasize modeling, simulation and practical implementation of control systems for robotic applications. (Prerequisites: linear algebra and differential equations as in MA 2071 and MA 2051; linear systems and control theory as in ECE 504 or consent of the instructor.)

 

 
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