Biomedical Engineering

Undergraduate Courses

BME 1001. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

This course uses lectures, demonstrations, projects and scientific literature readings on the major branches of biomedical engineering. A series of guest lectures, including device demonstrations introduce students to the many branches of biomedical engineering. Course work for BME 1001 is based on small, creative projects focusing on primary literature, department research, global health, and biomedical engineering as a whole

BME 1004. INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING IN MATLAB

Cat. I
This course will introduce basic and essential programming skills in modern engineering program language, Matlab, to all BME students. The course will include basic programming syntax, control structures, data structures (vectors, matrices, structures, cell arrays), 2D images, 3D image volumes, string manipulations, File I/O, figure plotting/visualization, image display, and basic graphical user interface (GUI) design.
Recommended background: none.
NOTE: The course does not count for engineering credits, but will fulfill the computer programming requirement for BME students.

BME 2001. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMATERIALS

Cat. I This beginning course provides important background for all science and engineering disciplines regarding the capabilities and limitations of materials relevant to the development of medical devices. Students are introduced to the fundamental theme of materials science-- structureproperty-processing relationships in biomaterials, specifically metals, ceramics, and plastics. Aspects of material structure range from the atomic to microstructural and macroscopic scales. In turn, these structural features determine the properties of materials. In particular, this course investigates connections between structure and mechanical properties, and how working and thermal treatments may transform structure and thus alter material properties. This knowledge is then applied to material selection decisions for the design of medical devices and engineered tissues. Recommended background: prior knowledge of college-level chemistry and physics. Students who have previously received credit for ES 2001 or BME 2811 may not receive credit for BME 2001.

BME 2210. BIOMEDICAL SIGNALS, INSTRUMENTS AND MEASUREMENTS

Cat I.

This course is an introduction to the instrumentation methods used to measure,
store and analyze the signals produced by biomedical phenomena. The goal of
this course is to familiarize students with the basic design and implementation of
techniques for measuring a broad scope of signal types for molecular, cellular
and physiological research. Sensors used for acquiring electrical, magnetic,
optical/spectral and chemical signals will be covered. Topics include the
underlying physics and chemistry of biomedical signals, biosensor types and
usage, amplification and signal conditioning, data acquisition methods, and
sources of artifact and noise.

Recommended background: PH 1120/21, CH 1010 or equivalent.

BME 2211. BIOMEDICAL DATA ANALYSIS

Cat I.
To learn the fundamentals of basic signal processing methods as well as linear
time series analyses framework for modeling and mining biological data. Tools
of data analysis include statistics for determining significance of a result, Laplace
and Z transforms, convolution, correlation, sampling theorem, Fourier
transform, transfer function, coherence function and various filtering techniques.
The goal of this course is to offer the students an opportunity to learn
and model and simulate static and dynamic physiological systems using linear
systems theory. First principles of chemistry and physics are used to quantitatively
model physiological systems. Most of the models are based on linear
systems theory. Simulations and estimation are performed using Matlab and
already-developed software.
Recommended background: BME 2210, CS 1004 or equivalent.

BME 2502. INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS: STRESS ANALYSIS

Cat. I This is an introductory course that addresses the analysis of basic mechanical and structural elements relevant to biomechanics. Topics include general concepts of stresses, strains, and material properties of biomaterials and biological materials including viscoelasticity. Also covered are stress concentrations, two-dimensional stress transformations, principal stresses, and Mohr’s circle. Applications are to uniaxially loaded bars, circular shafts under torsion, bending and shearing and deflection of beams. Both statically determinate and indeterminate problems are analyzed. Recommended background: Differential (MA 1021) and integral (MA 1022) calculus, vector algebra (MA 1023), physics mechanics (PH 1110 or PH 1111), and statics (ES 2501). Students who have previously received credit for BME 2511 or ES 2502 may not receive credit for BME 2502.

BME 2610. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING

Cat. I
This course is an introduction to fundamental material and energy balances related to the field of Biomedical Engineering. The fundamentals of bioprocess engineering calculations and data analysis, and bioengineering processes and process variables will be covered. Students will learn to identify a system, define boundary conditions, and characterize the system processes to generate appropriate material and energy balances using the principles of conservation of mass and energy. Fundamentals and applications in the human body and biomanufacturing are examined. Specific examples may include an organ, multiple organs or the entire body, bioprocess instrumentation, individual or groups of cells, cell culture bioreactors, tissue engineered scaffolds, and drug delivery systems.
Recommended background: Basic knowledge of differential and integral calculus (e.g. MA 1021 and MA 1022 or equivalent), human biology (e.g., BB 1025 or equivalent), and chemistry (e.g. CH 1010 and CH1020 or equivalent).

BME 3012. BIOMEDICAL SENSORS LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit)
This laboratory-based course is designed to develop hands-on experimental skills
relevant to the selection and application of various sensors used to acquire
biomedical signals.
Recommended background: BME 2210, BME 2211, ECE 2010, ECE 2019 or equivalent.

Students who have previously taken BME 3011 cannot receive credit for this
course.

BME 3013. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit)
This laboratory-based course is designed to develop hands-on experimental skills
relevant to the design and application of analog instrumentation commonly
used to acquire biomedical signals.

Recommended background: BME 2210, BME 2211, ECE 2010, ECE 2019
or equivalent.
Students who have previously taken BME 3011 cannot receive credit for this
course.

BME 3014. SIGNAL PROCESSING LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit)
This course is an introduction to the computational methods used to extract and analyze the signals produced by biomedical phenomena. The goal of this course is to familiarize the student with implementing the most common algorithmic approaches for data analysis used in biomedical engineering. Coursework will cover programming for topics such as peak detection, spectral analysis and the fast Fourier transform FFT method, auto-regression analysis, polynomial trend removal, and signal filtering methods.
Recommended background: BME 2211, CS1004 or equivalent

BME 3111. PHYSIOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

Cat. I
This course provides students with an understanding of mammalian physiology
and the engineering aspects of different physiological systems. The course will
have both a lecture and laboratory portion. The laboratory portion will provide
the students with the ability to analyze and interpret data from living systems,
which is a required ABET program criteria for student majoring in Biomedical
Engineering. The course will focus on a number of organ systems that may
include cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal. Engineering principles that include
biomechanical, bioelectrical, and biofluids will be applied to physiological systems.

Recommended background: A knowledge of biomechanics and biotransport (BME 2511), interactions of cells and biomaterials, (BME 2811), bioelectric foundations (BME 2210) and data acquisition and data analysis (BME 2211) or equivalent.

BME 3300. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN

Cat. I

Students are guided through the open-ended, real-world, design process starting
with the project definition, specification development, management, team
interactions and communication, failure and safety criteria, progress reporting,
marketing concepts, documentation and technical presentation of the final
project outcome. The course will include a significant writing component, will
make use of computers, and hands-on design explorations.

Students who have previously received credit for BME 2300 may not receive
credit for BME 3300.

BME 3503. SKELETAL BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit)
This laboratory course will help students increase their knowledge of the
mechanics of the musculoskeletal system. Students will gain understanding of
the course materials and technical skills through the combined hands-on
application of state-of-the-art biomechanical testing equipment and computer
simulation modules towards solving authentic problems involving balance,
strength, and movement.
Recommended background: Statics (ES 2501) and dynamics (ES 2503).
Students who have previously taken BME 3504 cannot receive credit for this course.

BME 3505. SOLID BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY: TECHNIQUES

Cat. I (1/6 units)
This laboratory-driven solid biomechanics course provides hands-on experience in
characterizing the mechanical properties of biological tissues such as bone, tendons, ligaments, skin, and blood vessels and their synthetic analogs. Students gain an in-depth understanding of the course material by performing uniaxial tension and compression, bending, and torsion tests on hard and soft tissues using industry-standard testing equipment and completing mechanical and statistical analysis of the data.
Recommended background: A solid knowledge of mechanics of materials (ES2502) and material science (ES 2001).
Students who have previously received credit for BME3504 cannot receive credit for this course.

BME 3506. SOLID BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY: APPLICATIONS

Cat. I (1/6 units)
This laboratory-driven solid biomechanics course provides hands-on experience in
characterizing the mechanical properties of biological tissues such as bone, tendons, ligaments, skin, and blood vessels and their synthetic analogs, in the context of an authentic challenge. Students gain an in-depth understanding of the course material from personal observations, measurements, and analysis of biological tissues and synthetic replacement/fixation materials using industry-standard testing equipment. A challenge-based laboratory project will be assigned which will require the students to determine and execute effective test methods at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively.
Recommended background: Ability to independently perform tensile and bending tests using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine and to perform mechanical and statistical analysis of test data (BME3505).
Students who have previously received credit for BME3504 cannot receive credit for this course.

BME 3605. BIOTRANSPORT LABORATORY

Cat. I (1/6 unit)

This laboratory-driven transport course provides hands-on experience in
measuring heat, flow, and transport in biologically-relevant systems. Students
gain an in-depth understanding of the course material from personal observations
and measurements on model cardiovascular systems and connective tissues.
Challenge-based laboratory projects will be assigned which will require the
students to determine and execute effective test methods at their own pace in a
team setting and communicate their findings effectively. Systems modeled may
include blood vessels, stenotic vessels, and aneurysms. Connective tissues tested
may include blood vessels and skin.
Recommended background: Heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and transport (BME 2511 and ES 3002, ES 3003, or ES 3004 or equivalent).

BME 361X. TRANSPORT ANALYSIS IN BIOENGINEERING

This course provides an overview of the modeling and analysis of fluid and mass transport processes related to the field of Biomedical Engineering. Fundamentals and applications of hydrostatics, conservation of mass and momentum in modeling and analysis of biological fluid transport processes in the human body are discussed. It includes modeling and analysis of blood and biological fluid flow through blood vessels, capillary beds and bioprocess equipment. Modeling and analysis of diffusive and convective mass transport in biological conduits and membranes, selective permeability and nutrient/waste exchange in parenchymal tissues with transport barriers unique to biological systems such as intact and fenestrated endothelium. Basic concepts of pharmacokinetics such as plasma clearance, volume of distribution of drugs and other biological solutes in body tissues are also covered. Surface adsorption and membrane permeability concepts are covered in the context of ligand-receptor interaction kinetics and passive and active transport, respectively.
Recommended background: Basic knowledge of differential and integral calculus (e.g., MA 2051 or equivalent), fundamental knowledge of biological system function or cell function (e.g., BB 1035 or BB 2550 or equivalent), fundamentals of data analysis and programming (e.g., BME 2211) and fundamentals of mathematical modeling techniques applied to biological systems (e.g., BME 2511 or BME 2811, or equivalent).

BME 3811. BIOMATERIALS LAB

Cat I (1/6 units)
This laboratory-driven course provides hands-on experience in the design, fabrication and characterization of biomaterials for medical applications. Students will use synthetic and natural polymer materials to fabricate a scaffold for applications such as tissue engineering, wound healing or controlled drug delivery. A challenge-based laboratory project will be assigned which will require the students to design a biomaterial scaffold that meets specific design criteria, and quantitatively assess the properties of this scaffold to evaluate how well the criteria were met. Design criteria may include mechanical strength, biocompatibility, porosity, degradation rate, or release kinetics. Students will complete the project at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively.
Recommended background: Basic chemistry (CH 1010 and CH 1020) and a knowledge of material science (ES 2001) or equivalent.

BME 3813. CELLULAR ENGINEERING LAB

Cat. I (1/6 units)
This laboratory-driven course provides hands-on experience in the application of bioengineering to control cellular processes. Students will be challenged to design an intervention to manipulate a specific cellular process (adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation) and use modern cellular and molecular biology tools to assess and refine their approach. Laboratory exercises will provide an overview of cell culture technique, microscopy and molecular probes, quantification of cell proliferation and migration, and assessment of cellular differentiation in the context of the assigned projects. Students will complete the project at their own pace in a team setting and communicate their findings effectively.
Recommended background: Basic chemistry (CH 1010 and CH 1020) and a solid knowledge of cell biology (BB 2550) or equivalent.

BME 4011. BIOMEDICAL SIGNAL ANAYLSIS

Cat. II
Introduction to biomedical signal processing
and analysis. Fundamental techniques to analyze
and process signals that originate from biological
sources: ECGs, EMGs, EEGs, blood pressure
signals, etc. Course integrates physiological
knowledge with the information useful for physiologic
investigation and medical diagnosis and
processing. Biomedical signal characterization,
time domain analysis techniques (transfer functions,
convolution, auto- and cross-correlation),
frequency domain (Fourier analysis), continuous
and discrete signals, deterministic and stochastic
signal analysis methods. Analog and digital filtering.

Recommended background: ECE 2311,
ECE 2312, or equivalent.
This course will be offered in 2016-17 and in alternating years thereafter

BME 4023. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION DESIGN

This course builds on the fundamental knowledge of instrumentation and sensors. Lectures cover the principles of designing, building and testing analog instruments to measure and process biomedical signals. The course is intended for students interested in the design and development of electronic bioinstrumentation. Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s ability to design a simple medical device to perform real-time physiological measurements.
Recommended background: BME 3012, BME 3013, ECE 2010 and ECE 2019.

BME 4201. BIOMEDICAL IMAGING

This course is a practical introduction to biomedical
image processing using examples from various
branches of medical imaging. Topics include:
point operations, filtering in the image and Fourier
domains, image reconstruction in computed
tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and
data analysis using image segmentation. Review of
linear-systems theory and the relevant principles
of physics. Course work uses examples from microscopy,
computed tomography, X-ray radiography,
and magnetic resonance imaging. Familiarity with a high-level
programming language is recommended.

BME 4300. MQP CAPSTONE DESIGN

Cat. I (1/6 unit)
This course guides students through the engineering design process during the first term of their MQP to aid them in fulfilling their capstone design requirement. The course focuses on developing a revised client statement based on the objectives, constraints, and functions of the design. Methods for concept generation, concept selection and development strategy will be covered. In addition, project planning tools, business plans, ethics, and design for manufacturability and sustainability will be covered.
Recommended background: Principles of engineering design such as BME 3300 or equivalent. Course should be taken concurrently with the MQP. Students who have taken BME 430X cannot get credit for BME 4300. BME 4300 cannot be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

BME 4504. BIOMECHANICS

Cat. I
This course emphasizes the applications of mechanics to describe the material properties of living tissues. It is concerned with the description and measurements of these properties as related to their physiological functions. Emphasis on the interrelationship between biomechanics and physiology in medicine, surgery, body injury and prostheses. Topics covered include: review of basic mechanics, stress, strain, constitutive equations and the field equations, viscoelastic behavior, and models of material behavior. The measurement and characterization of properties of tendons, skin, muscles and bone. Biomechanics as related to body injury and the design of prosthetic devices.

Recommended background: mechanics (ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503, ME 3501), mathematics (MA 2051).

BME 450X. COMPUTATIONAL BIOMECHANICS

This course will focus on using computational modeling approaches, particularly, finite element models, to simulate, validate, and analyze the biomechanics involved in soft and hard tissue deformation and stress/strain analysis in quasi-static or impact conditions. First, students will be introduced to the process of setting specific analytical goals and establishing the need for a specific quantitative biomechanical model. Then, basic underlying principles of forward and inverse static/dynamics simulations are covered. Finally, multi-scale and multi-step models will be introduced. During the process, material models and property assignment will also be covered. Model building, testing, optimization and validation with experimental data will be discussed. An introduction to tools and techniques used in computational biomechanics will be provided.
Recommended background: Basic knowledge of solid mechanics (e.g., ES 2501, ES 2502, ES 2503, ME 3501 or equivalent), differential and integral calculus (e.g., MA 2051 or equivalent).

BME 4606. BIOFLUIDS

Cat. II
This course emphasizes the applications of fluid mechanics to biological
problems. The course concentrates primarily on the human circulatory and
respiratory systems. Topics covered include: blood flow in the heart, arteries,
veins and microcirculation and air flow in the lungs and airways. Mass transfer
across the walls of these systems is also presented.

Recommended background: continuum mechanics (ME 3501), fluids (ES 3004).

BME 4701. CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOENGINEERING

Cat. I

This course examines the principles of molecular
and cell biology applied to the design of
engineered molecules, cells and tissues. Topics will
include the basic structural, chemical and physical
properties of biomolecules (proteins, lipids, DNA
and RNA), application of biomolecules to monitor
and alter cellular processes in vitro and in vivo,
and design considerations for engineering cell and molecular therapeutics. Case studies will be used
to examine specific applications of molecular and
cellular bioengineering technologies to treat disease
and promote tissue repair and regeneration.

Recommended background: Cell biology (BB
2550). Additional coursework in molecular biology
(BB 2950) and/or genetics (BB 2920) would
be beneficial.
Students who earned credit for BME 37XX cannot
receive credit for BME 4701.

BME 4814. BIOMEDICAL MATERIALS

Cat. I
This course discusses various aspects pertaining to
the selection, processing, testing (in vitro and in
vivo) and performance of biomedical materials.
The biocompatibility and surgical applicability
of metallic, polymeric and ceramic implants and
prosthetic devices are discussed. The physico-chemical
interactions between the implant material
and the physiological environment will be
described. The use of biomaterials in maxillofacial,
orthopedic, dental, ophthalmic and neuromuscular
applications is presented.
Recommended
background: BB 3101 or equivalent introduction
to Human Anatomy, ES 2001 or equivalent introduction to materials science and engineering.

BME 4828. BIOMATERIAL - TISSUE INTERACTIONS

Cat. I
This course examines the principles of materials
science and cell biology underlying the design of
medical devices, artificial organs, and scaffolds for
tissue engineering. Molecular and cellular interactions
with biomaterials are analyzed in terms
of cellular processes such as matrix synthesis,
degradation, and contraction. Principles of wound
healing and tissue remodeling are used to study
biological responses to implanted materials and
devices. Case studies will be analyzed to compare
tissue responses to intact, bioresorbable and
bioerodible biomaterials. Additionally, this course
will examine criteria for restoring physiological
function of tissue and organs, and investigate
strategies to design implants and prostheses based
on control of biomaterial-tissue interactions.
Recommended Background:
BB 2550 or equivalent, ES 2001 or equivalent, PH 1110 or PH 1111.

BME 4831. DRUG DELIVERY

Cat. I
The course examines fundamental composition, structure, property and performance relationships in classical and novel drug delivery systems as part of disease treatment strategies (i.e. cancer, organ damage). Physiological barriers to drug delivery and methods to overcome these barriers are analyze. The course will familiarize students with biomaterial-based drug delivery systems that have recently been developed. Topics include routes of drug administration, diffusion, Fick's law, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, drug modifications, materials for drug delivery (implantable, transdermal, injectable), antibody therapeutics, cells as drugs and drug delivery vehicles, and novel drug formulations and delivery systems.
Recommended background: Fundamental knowledge of biomaterials (e.g. BME 2811 or equivalent), multivariable calculus (e.g. MA 1024 or equivalent) and biological system function or cell function (e.g., BB 1035 or BB 2550 or equivalent).

Graduate Courses

BME 523. BIOMEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION

Origins and characteristics of bioelectric signals,
recording electrodes, biopotential amplifiers,
basic sensors, chemical, pressure, sound, and flow
transducers, noninvasive monitoring techniques
and electrical safety. (Prerequisites: Circuits and
electronics, control engineering or equivalent.)

BME 531. BIOMATERIALS IN THE DESIGN OF MEDICAL DEVICES

Biomaterials are an integral part of medical devices,
implants, controlled drug delivery systems, and
tissue engineered constructs. Extensive research
efforts have been expended on understanding
how biologic systems interact with biomaterials.
Meanwhile, controversy has revolved around
biomaterials and their availability as a result of
the backlash to the huge liability resulting from
controversies related to material and processing
shortcomings of medical devices. This course specifically
addresses the unique role of biomaterials
in medical device design and the use of emerging
biomaterials technology in medical devices. The
need to understand design requirements of medical
devices based on safety and efficacy will be
addressed. Unexpected device failure can occur if
testing fails to account for synergistic interactions
from chronic loading, aqueous environments,
and biologic interactions. Testing methodologies
are readily available to assess accelerated effects of
loading in physiologic-like environments. This
combined with subchronic effects of animal implants
is a potential tool in assessing durability. It
is difficult to predict the chronic effects of the total
biologic environment. The ultimate determination
of safety comes not only from following the
details of regulations, but with an understanding
of potential failure modes and designs that lowers
the risk of these failures. This course will evaluate
biomaterials and their properties as related to the
design and reliability of medical devices.

BME 532. MEDICAL DEVICE REGULATION

This course provides an overview of regulations
that guide the medical devices industry. Primary
focus is on the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act
(FD&C Act) and its associated regulations.
The course covers the FD&C Act, including
definitions, prohibited acts, penalties and general
authority. The course also covers regulations,
including establishment registration, premarket
approval (PMA) and current good manufacturing
practices. Requirements of other federal agencies
(NRC, FCC, EPA) will also be discussed.

BME 550. TISSUE ENGINEERING

This biomaterials course focuses on the selection,
processing, testing and performance of materials
used in biomedical applications with special
emphasis upon tissue engineering. Topics include
material selection and processing, mechanisms
and kinetics of material degradation, cell-material
interactions and interfaces; effect of construct architecture
on tissue growth; and transport through
engineered tissues. Examples of engineering tissues
for replacing cartilage, bone, tendons, ligaments,
skin and liver will be presented. (Prerequisites: A first course in biomaterials equivalent
to BME/ME 4814 and a basic understanding
of cell biology and physiology. Admission of undergraduate students requires the permission of the instructor.)

BME 552. TISSUE MECHANICS

This biomechanics course focuses on advanced
techniques for the characterization of the structure
and function of hard and soft tissues and their
relationship to physiological processes. Applications
include tissue injury, wound healing, the
effect of pathological conditions upon tissue
properties, and design of medical devices and
prostheses. (Prerequisite: An understanding of
basic continuum mechanics.)

BME 555. BIOMEMS AND TISSUE MICROENGINEERING

This course covers microscale biological and physical phenomena and state-of-the-art techniques to measure and manipulate these processes. Topics include scaling laws, microfabrication, machining three-dimensional microstructures, patterning biomolecules, and designing and building microfluidic devices. We will cover various biomedical problems that can be addressed with microfabrication technology and their associated engineering challenges, with special emphasis on applications related to quantitative biology, tissue microengineering, controlling the cellular microenvironment, and clinical/diagnostic lab-on-a-chip devices.

BME 560. PHYSIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS

An introduction to fundamental principles in
cell biology and physiology designed to provide
the necessary background for advanced work in
biomedical engineering. Quantitative methods of
engineering and the physical sciences are stressed.
Topics include cell biology, DNA technology and
the physiology of major organ systems.

NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a life
science requirement in the biomedical engineering
program. It cannot be used to satisfy a biomedical
engineering course requirement.

BME 562. LABORATORY ANIMAL SURGERY

A study of anesthesia, surgical techniques and
postoperative care in small laboratory animals.
Anatomy and physiology of species used included
as needed. Class limited to 15 students. Approximately
15 surgical exercises are performed by
each student. (Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Admission of undergraduate students requires
the permission of the department head and the
instructor.)

NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a life
science requirement in the biomedical engineering
program. It cannot be used to satisfy a biomedical
engineering course requirement.

BME 564. CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS

An advanced course in cell and molecular biology for engineering graduate students, with an emphasis on molecular approaches to measuring and manipulating cell responses for biomedical engineering applications. Course topics will include in depth exploration of the molecular basis of cellular function, including protein biochemistry, signal transduction, cell-extracellular matrix interactions and regulation of gene expression. Tools and techniques used in modern cell and molecular biology will be discussed in the context of current research literature.

NOTE: This course can be used to satisfy a life science requirement in the graduate biomedical engineering program. It cannot be used to satisfy a biomedical engineering course requirement (undergraduate or graduate).

BME 581. MEDICAL IMAGING SYSTEMS

Overview of the physics of medical image analysis.
Topics covered include X-Ray tubes, fluoroscopic
screens, image intensifiers; nuclear medicine;
ultrasound; computer tomography; nuclear magnetic
resonance imaging. Image quality of each
modality is described mathematically, using linear
systems theory (Fourier transforms, convolutions).
(Prerequisite: Signal analysis course BME/ECE
4011 or equivalent.)

BME 583. BIOMEDICAL MICROSCOPY AND QUANTITATIVE IMAGING

This course introduces fundamental principles of biomedical imaging focused on quantitative microscopy. Topics include physical basis of light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, live cell imaging and computer vision algorithms. Advanced topics include 3D imaging (confocal, light sheet, 2-photon), super-resolution, sample preparation, and equipment considerations. Selected topics in medical imaging (CT, MRI, ultrasound) may be included, with hands-on instruction on commercial and student-built systems.
NOTE: Students who received credit for BME 581 in Spring 2016 may not also receive credit for BME 583.

BME 591. GRADUATE SEMINAR

Topics in biomedical engineering are presented
both by authorities in the field and graduate students in the program. Provides a forum for
the communication of current research and an
opportunity for graduate students to prepare and
deliver oral presentations. Students may meet the
attendance requirement for this course in several
ways, including attendance at weekly biomedical
engineering seminars on the WPI campus, attendance
at similar seminar courses at other universities
or biotech firms, attendance at appropriate
conferences, meetings or symposia, or in any other
way deemed appropriate by the course instructor.

BME 592. HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS AND CLINICAL PRACTICE

This course fulfills the Clinical Competency requirement in Biomedical Engineering. The course will follow a seminar format, with healthcare professionals, faculty, and medical device industry experts serving as invited lecturers and case study presenters. The course is designed to introduce BME graduate students to clinical environments and practice, healthcare delivery systems, and communication with clinical stakeholders.

BME 594. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL CLUB

(1 credit)
This course will cover different topics in biomedical engineering research, both basic and translational. Enrolled students read and discuss the literature in relevant topics, which may include biomaterials, drug delivery, tissue engineering, cardiovascular engineering, mechanobiology, quantitative imaging, instrumentation, computational biomechanics, injury and rehabilitative biomechanics, or any focused topic related to biomedical engineering. The objectives of the course are for students to learn about current topics within a focused area of biomedical engineering, to improve their ability to critically review literature, and develop their technical presentation skills. Multiple sections of biomedical engineering journal club focused on different research topics may be offered each semester. (Pre-requisite: Master’s or Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering or a related discipline).
Biomedical engineering graduate students may take up to 3 credits of BME 594 to satisfy Biomedical Engineering or Elective course credit to meet graduate program distribution requirements.
NOTE: This course cannot be used to satisfy Biomedical Engineering or Engineering elective credit to meet undergraduate program distribution requirements.