• ECON 110X. EVERYDAY ECONOMICS
  • ECON 210X. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
  • ECON 212X. PUBLIC ECONOMICS
  • ECON 291X. ECONOMICS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
  • ECON 1110. INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS
  • ECON 1120. INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS
  • ECON 1130. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRIC MODELING
  • ECON 2110. INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS
  • ECON 2117. ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
  • ECON 2120. INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
  • ECON 2125. DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS
  • ECON 2145. BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS
  • ECON 2155. EXPERIMENTAL ECONOMICS
  • ENV 150X. INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
  • ENV 200X. CLIMATE CHANGE: VULNERABILITY AND MITIGATION
  • ENV 230X. ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND INNOVATION
  • ENV 250X. GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN CHINA
  • ENV 280X. ENVIRONMENTAL & RISK COMMUNICT
  • ENV 300X. FIELD COURSE IN EUROPEAN URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY
  • ENV 1100. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
  • ENV 1500. INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS
  • ENV 2200. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES IN THE VARIOUS DISCIPLINES
  • ENV 2201. PLANNING FOR SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES
  • ENV 2310. ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE AND INNOVATION
  • ENV 2400. ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR
  • ENV 2600. ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD
  • ENV 2700. SOCIAL MEDIA, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, AND THE ENVIRONMENT
  • ENV 2900. THE GREEN ECONOMY AND MODELS FOR ALTERNATIVE FORMS OF DEVELOPMENT
  • ENV 3100. ADVENTURES IN SUSTAINABLE URBANISM
  • ENV 4400. SENIOR SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
  • GOV 200X. THE POLITICS OF PLAGUE
  • GOV 231X. THE POLITICS OF FOOD
  • GOV 1301. U.S. GOVERNMENT
  • GOV 1303. AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICY
  • GOV 1310. LAW, COURTS, AND POLITICS
  • GOV 1320. TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
  • GOV 2302. SCIENCE-TECHNOLOGY POLICY
  • GOV 2310. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: FOUNDATIONS OF GOVERNMENT
  • GOV 2311. ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND LAW
  • GOV 2312. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
  • GOV 2313. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW
  • GOV 2314. CYBERLAW AND POLICY
  • GOV 2315. PRIVACY: HOW LAWS, POLICY, AND TECHNOLOGY FIT TOGETHER
  • GOV 2319. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS
  • GOV 2320. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES
  • PSY 140X. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSY 141X. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSY 340X. SURVEY DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY
  • PSY 1400. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE
  • PSY 1401. COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSY 1402. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSY 1404. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSY 1412. MENTAL HEALTH
  • PSY 1504. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING COGNITIVE SKILLS
  • PSY 2401. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EDUCATION
  • PSY 2406. CROSS-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY: HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
  • PSY 2407. PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER
  • PSY 2408. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSY 2410. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSY 2501. MUSIC AND MIND
  • PSY 2502. PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY
  • PSY 2504. HUMAN SEXUALITY
  • PSY 3000. PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW
  • PSY 3500. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
  • SOC 221X. LEARNING STYLES, CREATIVITY, AND TEAMWORK
  • SOC 1202. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY
  • SS 150X. GAMES OF UNDERSTANDING COMPLEXITY
  • SS 2400. METHODS, MODELING, AND ANALYSIS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE
  • STS 120X. FUNDAMENTALS OF GLOBAL HEALTH
  • STS 1200. FUNDAMENTALS OF GLOBAL HEALTH
  • STS 1207. INTRODUCTION TO THE PSYCHO-SOCIOLOGY OF SCIENCE
  • STS 2208. THE SOCIETY-TECHNOLOGY DEBATE
  • STS 4000. SENIOR SEMINAR IN GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH

Supplemental Undergraduate Courses

  • ECON 110X. EVERYDAY ECONOMICS
    In its simplest form, economics is about how people respond to incentives. Every day, we all make many decisions in which we choose among the options available to us by responding to the relevant incentives. People wake up and decide whether to go to school or work, or enjoy a day of leisure. They choose what to do with the money that they earn. Though people typically do not understand the complex cost/benefit analysis associated with the decisions that they make, they for the most part make decisions suggesting that they do. In this course, we will study the economics of real world situations like those from the books Freakonomics and Super Freakonomics. We will cover the economic theory necessary for understanding the topics of the course, but the focus is the real-world applications of basic economic principles. The course involves a project and presentations.

    Recommended background: None
  • ECON 212X. PUBLIC ECONOMICS
    This course examines the economics of government expenditure and taxation. On the expenditure side, the course will review why governments often choose to be involved in the provision of healthcare, education, national defense, a clean environment, and infrastructure such as roads and bridges. It will also delve into the rationale behind programs such as social security. Regarding taxation, the course will cover income, consumption, and corporate taxes, including the use of corrective taxes to address market failures due to externalities. Within each topic, the relevant economic theories will be presented, and then students will practice applying the theories to real-world examples. As such, there will be plenty of opportunity to discuss policy implications and debate proposed policy changes.

    Recommended background: ECON 1110 or ECON 1120
  • ECON 291X. ECONOMICS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
    This course is designed to provide an introduction to economics, an introduction to entrepreneurship, and an understanding of the linkages between economics and entrepreneurship. Students will apply these concepts to the assessment of opportunities that might arise from participation in WPI projects. Students will engage in exploring how economics and entrepreneurship can inform opportunity assessment within an ambiguous and uncertain context. These decisions are always made with incomplete information and there is typically no single correct answer but rather multiple possible answers -- each with pluses and minuses.
  • GOV 200X. THE POLITICS OF PLAGUE
    Black Death. Cholera. Smallpox. Spanish flu. AIDS. Swine flu. Ebola. Humans have been the victims of infectious diseases across history, geography, and cultures. But what elevates an outbreak to the level of an epidemic or a pandemic? And when should the state step in? This class explores how states respond to epidemics. The course will be split into four modules for advanced analysis. The first section will focus on understanding disease in the context of public policy and international relations studies. Then, students will perform in-depth studies of three major outbreaks. Through readings, lectures, class activities, and research, students will learn the historical basis of state response to epidemics. They will apply international relations theories and concepts to the three case studies, in addition to developing analytic and research skills to engage effectively with the debates in contemporary scholarship on public health issues and risk assessment and management strategies in public policy. Students will explore the role of government in addressing public health threats, as well as how public health is a crucial component of national security.

    Recommended background: GOV1303 or GOV1320 and an understanding of basic public policy, both in the US and on an international scale.
  • PSY 340X. SURVEY DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY
    Surveys are everywhere. But good surveys based on sound social science are rare. Conducting a successful survey requires familiarity with the methods and techniques developed by psychologists and other social scientists through long experience to ensure the accuracy, reliability, and validity of survey data. This course will focus on the common mistakes of first time survey researchers and ways to avoid them. Topics covered will include alternatives to survey research, sampling, response rates, questionnaire design and implementation, question wording, pretesting, ethical issues in survey research, and communicating survey results. Special attention will be given to issues related to the use of on-line survey platforms. During the course students will be guided through the development, implementation, and analysis of a survey on a topic of their own choosing.

    This course is an appropriate methodology course for psychology and other social science majors and can also be taken by students of all majors as preparation for a survey-based IQP.

    Recommended background: Social Psychology (PSY1402) or Introduction to Sociology and Diversity (SOC1202) or equivalent.
  • SOC 221X. LEARNING STYLES, CREATIVITY, AND TEAMWORK
    In this course psychological concepts developed to study personality and creativity connect with concepts from the sociology of education and the study of innovation. The result is a psycho-sociological perspective on “learning styles” as they affect both individual and active cooperative learning in small groups. Several different measures of learning style will be discussed in this course, including the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the Gordon-Mednick Cognitive Style Indicator, and others. Applications of these measures to a variety of outcomes will be examined, including SAT scores, high school achievement tests, career and major choices, student reactions to courses, texts, and programs, 4-year graduation rates, graduation with honors, and team formation in college and the workplace. The course culminates in a final team project that will take the form of a proposal writing exercise to recommend changes to a public school system or college on how to best serve different kinds of learners.

    Suggested background: PSY1402 or STS1207.
  • SS 590. ST:EDUCATIONAL DATA MINING

Supplemental Graduate Courses

  • SS 590: ST: ENERGY AND ENVIRO DYNAMICS
    Energy and Environmental Dynamics helps students develop understanding and proficiency in system dynamics simulation of energy and environmental problems. The majority of this course is devoted to case studies that focus on energy, water and environmental problems in the western USA. Major business applications deal with boom and bust in power plant construction and a similar pattern of boom and bust in real-estate construction.
  • SS 590: ST:APP MULTI MODEL IN MATH EDU
    This course examines current issues in mathematics education and introduces students to the analysis of nested data structures (e.g. students within classrooms). Readings will be drawn from book chapters on multilevel modeling and journal articles that utilize a national longitudinal data set (ECLS-K) to answer questions about student learning in mathematics education. The lab portion of this course will provide students with opportunities to learn and apply hierarchical linear modeling to longitudinal data using two computer programs (HLM and SPSS).
  • SS 590: ST:Q/QMETHD ASSESS STDT LEARN
    Assessment that supports teaching and learning is the focus of this course. Participants are introduced to the five keys of quality classroom assessment (Chappuis et al.) and examine each individual key through introductory readings, classroom case studies, discussions with colleagues, activities, and personal reflections.

    Participants will go through the process of standard-based planning to define learning targets, identify misconceptions, and develop assessment plan. A variety of quantitative and qualitative assessment methods will be introduced and practiced during the course. In addition, participants will review some key documents related to assessment of student
    learning. The final course assignment is a performance assessment, in which participants are asked to design a quality assessment, employ it in their classroom (if possible), analyze results and reflect on the experience. Participants will be able to develop and receive feedback on the final project’s components during the course.
  • SS 590: ST:GRNT WRITG SCIENCE & EDUC
    This course will provide the foundation to enable graduate students to find appropriate funding sources and write a competitive grant proposal in learning sciences and educational psychology research. Students will learn about the entire grant submission process, including proposal development and the peer review evaluation process. The end goal of the course is to create a high quality grant or dissertation fellowship proposal for agencies such as NSF, IES, AERA, and the Spencer Foundation.