The robots in our future

WPI mechanical engineering professor Greg Fischer, the director of WPI’s Automation and Interventional Medicine Lab, is noted in a story about medical robotics and his research on MRI-compatible robots for cancer therapy.

Mumbai Mirror
Vegan burgers muscle their way onto menus as plant-based diets take root

The Telegram & Gazette sought input from WPI’s Glenn Gaudette, the Willliam Smith Dean’s Professor of Biomedical Engineering, for this article. “From a scientific point of view, it is not that shocking if you think about all we can do in regards to genetic engineering in human and animal cells,” Gaudette told the T&G.  “There has been some amazing work done in plant biology that just doesn’t get the same press as human biology.”

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WPI professor aims to understand life and death of our cells

The Worcester Business Journal is the latest to report on research by Kristen Billiar, professor and head of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, who hopes to close an important gap in the understanding of physical factors that help regulate the life and death of cells in our bodies, and the important roles they play in the development of a wide range of disorders. Co-principle investigators include Nima Rahbar, associate professor of civil & environmental engineering, and Qi Wen, associate professor of physics.

Worcester Business Journal
Training Engineers To Spot Opportunity And Impact

Glenn Gaudette, the William Smith Dean’s Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Director of the Value Creation Initiative, was quoted in a Forbes article about the importance of training engineering students to think entrepreneurially. The article focused on the Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN), of which WPI is a member.

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WPI team developing athletic shoe to reduce ACL knee injuries

WPI students Julia Dunn ’19, Josephine Bowen ’20, graduate student Jimmy Muller, and Professor Chris Brown are featured in the Telegram & Gazette about an athletic shoe designed to reduce knee and ankle injuries.  

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How a WPI-engineered shoe could prevent devastating joint injuries

WPI student Alex Alvarez ’19, graduate student Jimmy Muller, and Professor Chris Brown appear on Boston 25 News touting the benefits of an athletic shoe designed to reduce knee and ankle injuries.

Boston 25
WPI senior discusses shoe project on WBUR radio

WPI senior Kyle Mudge ’19 appears on WBUR radio discussing a working prototype of a sports shoe designed to reduce knee and ankle injuries.

WBUR 90.9
WPI Invents New Shoe

Mechanical engineering professor Chris Brown and WPI senior Kyle Mudge ’19 appear on the Charter TV3 segment segment about the WPI student team developing a working prototype of a sports shoe designed to reduce knee and ankle injuries. 

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WPI Students Design Shoe To Protect Athletes From ACL Injuries

WBZ-TV aired a segment about the WPI student team developing a working prototype of a sports shoe designed to reduce knee and ankle injuries. 

CBS Boston
How scientists are hijacking plant skeletons to make “clean meat” steaks

Glenn Gaudette, professor of biomedical engineering, was interviewed by New Food Economy for this article, a look at efforts to develop alternative food sources in the future.

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Engineers Creating Diseased Blood Vessels to Test Medications

WBUR reported on research by Marsha Rolle, associate professor of biomedical engineering, spoke to WBUR about her work to develop self-assembling human blood vessels that exhibit the symptoms of common cardiovascular conditions. The engineered blood vessels may give scientists a better way to test the effectiveness of new medications.

WBUR 90.9
Engineering Innovation Sperm Obstacle Course Engineering Innovation Podcast and Radio Series

WTOP radio in Washington, D.C., aired a segment featuring Erkan Tüzel, associate professor of physics, biomedical engineering, and computer science, discussing a sperm-sorting device that could improve IVF success. The segment also appears on the National Academy of Engineering web site.

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Sperm Sorting Device Developed At WPI May Improve Fertility Treatments

WBZ-TV​ profiled research in which a team of researchers from WPI and Stanford University developed a sperm sorting device that could improve IVF Success. The device uses an “obstacle course” to sort and select faster and healthier sperm cells. 

CBS Boston
Our 21 Most Popular Stories of 2017

WPI’s now-famous spinach leaf was named seventh in National Geographic’s Our 21 Most Popular Stories of 2017.” The annual roundup noted that, “In a feat of science that captivated the attention of a million readers, a spinach leaf’s genetic material was replaced with that of a human heart, with far-reaching implications for future heart surgeries.” 

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How much battering can a brain take?

The Boston Globe profiled research by biomedical engineering professor Songbai Ji in this article. Ji is developing animated brain maps that show how brain tissue deforms and stretches after impact, which could prove valuable in understanding concussions. “Ji hopes someday to show players and coaches what each hit has probably done to the brain - the minute it happens.

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A New Way to Measure Potential Football Concussions

Bill Marcus interviewed Professor Songbai Ji, biomedical engineering, about his research using advanced neuroimaging to develop highly specific computer models of the head and brain to better diagnose concussions in real time. Ji’s work is funded by two grants from the National Institutes of Health. 

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This team is on the verge of creating a beating Band-Aid for the heart. Just don’t call it goopy

The Boston Globe’s ‘STAT’ section published an article today on WPI research aimed at helping the heart recover after parts of it die from lack of oxygen. “I want to fix people with heart attacks,” George Pins, PhD, associate professor of biomedical engineering, told STAT. “I think it’s an important global health care problem and there’s significant unmet need.”

STAT News
Spinach Leaves Are The Heartbeat Of These Scientists' Research

WGBH featured the WPI-related segment interviewing Glenn Gaudette, professor of biomedical engineering, and grad student Joshua Gershlak, on growing heart tissue on spinach.

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Spinach Leaf Transformed Into Beating Human Heart Tissue

National Geographic features a WPI research team that has learned how to grow heart cells on spinach leaves. The stripped down spinach becomes a vascular network to deliver blood, oxygen and nutrients to grow human tissues like cardiac muscle to treat heart attack patients.

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Thanks to WPI Undergrads, This Sea Turtle has a ‘Biomimetic’ Flipper

A WPI student research project which created a 3D printed prosthetic for a rare sea turtle lands to front page of The Boston Globe.

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