In the News

Note: Some media outlets require users to log-in. The Gordon Library offers the WPI community free access to a number of newspapers. Visit newspaper database for details.  

Preview News Image

WPI researcher provides expertise and context in The New York Times on AT&T data breach

“When you move your IT infrastructure to the cloud, suddenly you’re in a place that is shared with a bunch of other people, and it becomes much trickier… There are many more ways in which potential attacks can be done.”  Professor Patrick Schaumont in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering provided analysis for The New York Times on the AT&T breach involving the data of more than 100 million phone customers. He discussed the potential risks of shared IT infrastructure in the cloud. The article also appeared on MSN. He was also quoted on the national security concerns raised by the data breach in an article on CBS News that was posted on yahoo! News and AOL.

Boston 25

Professor of Biomedical Engineering Glenn Gaudette, was interviewed in a Boston 25 segment (.57).  "A tight fit is key and the mask should be flush against one’s face to keep air droplets carrying the virus from entering and exiting your mouths and nose," he said.

WHDH-TV

As local hospitals struggle with a shortage of supplies during the coronavirus outbreak, WPI faculty have been collecting Nitrile gloves, masks, and other protective gear to donate, reported WHDH.

Mass Live

In addition to collecting and donating protective supplies like masks and gloves to local hospitals during the coronavirus outbreak, WPI is also offering other services, such as printing supplies via 3-D printers, MassLive reported.

Telegram.com

The Telegram & Gazette reported on the supplies WPI faculty collected to donate to the medical facilities in the region as colleges and universities across the Commonwealth respond to the COVID-19 outbreak. The university is donating roughly 35,000 gloves and 1,000 surgical masks, along with protective gowns, shoe covers and other needed materials.

WCVB

WCVB News Center 5 at Noon talked to WPI about supplies faculty collected to donate to the medical facilities in the region as colleges and universities across the Commonwealth respond to the COVID-19 outbreak. The university is donating roughly 35,000 gloves and 1,000 surgical masks, along with protective gowns, shoe covers and other needed materials.

Telegram.com

The Telegram & Gazette sought input from WPI’s Glenn Gaudette, the Willliam Smith Dean’s Professor of Biomedical Engineering, for this article. “From a scientific point of view, it is not that shocking if you think about all we can do in regards to genetic engineering in human and animal cells,” Gaudette told the T&G.  “There has been some amazing work done in plant biology that just doesn’t get the same press as human biology.”

Forbes

Glenn Gaudette, the William Smith Dean’s Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Director of the Value Creation Initiative, was quoted in a Forbes article about the importance of training engineering students to think entrepreneurially. The article focused on the Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN), of which WPI is a member.

New Food Economy (the)

Glenn Gaudette, professor of biomedical engineering, was interviewed by New Food Economy for this article, a look at efforts to develop alternative food sources in the future.

National Geographic

WPI’s now-famous spinach leaf was named seventh in National Geographic’s Our 21 Most Popular Stories of 2017.” The annual roundup noted that, “In a feat of science that captivated the attention of a million readers, a spinach leaf’s genetic material was replaced with that of a human heart, with far-reaching implications for future heart surgeries.” 

WGBH

WGBH featured the WPI-related segment interviewing Glenn Gaudette, professor of biomedical engineering, and grad student Joshua Gershlak, on growing heart tissue on spinach.

National Geographic

National Geographic features a WPI research team that has learned how to grow heart cells on spinach leaves. The stripped down spinach becomes a vascular network to deliver blood, oxygen and nutrients to grow human tissues like cardiac muscle to treat heart attack patients.

STEM Cells Portal

A study demonstrating changes in heart function that occur directly in the region where researchers delivered stem cells was coauthored by Katrina Hansen, PhD candidate in Biomedical Engineering; Glenn Gaudette, professor, biomedical engineering; and other university colleagues.