INTL 2310. MODERN LATIN AMERICA

Cat. II What is justice during an era of globalization? What are the rights and responsibilities of individuals, groups, nations, or supranational organizations in a world of profound inequalities of wealth or disparities of power? This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to historical, literary, religious, and ethical debates about global justice as well as the political and practical responses by various actors in the global South and North.

INTL 2110. GLOBAL JUSTICE

Cat. II What is justice during an era of globalization? What are the rights and responsibilities of individuals, groups, nations, or supranational organizations in a world of profound inequalities of wealth or disparities of power? This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to historical, literary, religious, and ethical debates about global justice as well as the political and practical responses by various actors in the global South and North.

INTL 1300. INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICA

Cat. I This course reviews the past and present of South America, Central America and the Caribbean through an interdisciplinary approach. It examines historical and contemporary issues related to social mobilization, cultural innovation, political activism, economic development, and environmental sustainability through the critical analysis of books, films, and creative arts from and about the region.

HU 2910. PROJECT CENTER EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Cat. III This course will provide students participating in a HUA Project Center with a framework for investigating a particular cultural site, and to define a unique set of humanities and arts learning goals through experiential learning. Experiential learning means learning from experience or learning by doing. Experiential education immerses learners in an experience and then encourages reflection about the experience to develop new skills, new attitudes, or new ways of thinking.

HU 2502. GLOBAL FEMINISMS

Cat. II Bringing together transnational, postcolonial, and indigenous feminist and queer lines of thought, this course provides a global perspective on the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and women’s studies. Motivated by the idea that marginalized peoples - including women, those who identify as non-binary, and ethnic, religious, and economic minorities - share common experiences of exclusion and common stories of resistance, this course fosters critical examination of the relationship between gender, sexuality, feminism, colonialism, and racism.

HU 2501. STEM-INISM

Cat. II The study and practice of STEM-inism centers the equal participation and representation of all social groups in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). In particular, this course highlights the concepts, theories, and practices of feminism into its understanding of STEM-inism as a field of inquiry.

HU 2258: WORLD CINEMAS

Cat. II This course will examine works of film from multiple continents, drawing on film criticism and theory and attending to the development of film industries in several different cultural contexts and national traditions. Some iterations may turn on a broader survey, others on more particular engagements with wider inflections.

HU 2222. TOPICS IN MEDICAL HUMANITIES

Cat. II Topics in Medical Humanities provides students with opportunities to investigate the human (cultural, religious, historical, philosophical) dimensions of medicine, illness, and healing, from various perspectives in the humanities.

HU 1222. INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL HUMANITIES

Cat. II How do medicine, disease, health, and healing shape our experience of what it is to be human? What do literature, poetry, popular culture, or religious and spiritual traditions have to do with modern medical practices and institutions? This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities, and its core set of concepts, questions, methodologies, and theoretical frameworks.

HI 3344. PACIFIC WORLDS

Cat. II The Pacific Ocean covers a third of our earth’s surface. Home to over a thousand languages and thousands of years of rich histories, the Pacific has been and continues to be one of the most diverse regions of cultural, social, economic, and environmental interaction. The course focuses on both local connections to the Pacific, such as the New England whaling industry, and global issues, such as the impact of climate change on Pacific islanders. Other topics to be discussed include the environment, oceanic navigation, arts, colonialism, race, and migration. 

Pages