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Worcester Business Journal

The Worcester Business Journal reported on WPI receiving $3 million from the National Science Foundation to study human-robot interaction in the workplace. Eight WPI researchers are involved: Cagdas Onal (principal investigator), Yunus Telliel, Jeanine Skorinko, Winston Soboyejo, Jing Xiao, Pratap Rao, Soussan Djamasbi and Jane Li
 

The Worcester Business Journal featured Haichong (Kai) Zhang, assistant professor in biomedical engineering and robotics engineering, and his receiving a five-year $1,869,423 Director's Early Independence Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It’s for his ongoing work to create a robotic system that will detect and analyze three different indicators of prostate cancer. Gregory Fischer, professor of robotics engineering, is also working on the project.

Associate Computer Science Professor Craig Shue was interviewed by the Worcester Business Journal for this article. As companies increase their defenses, hackers, meanwhile, react. “It is an arms race. We do have an ebb and flow going back and forth,” Shue said. “It almost feels like a competitive sport at times

The Worcester Business Journal reported on WPI and the University of Massachusetts Lowell partnering to award more than $111,000 in seed funding to six different teams, focusing on work ranging from human-robot collaboration to cancer detection and rehabilitation for stroke patients.

The Worcester Business Journal is the latest to report on how Ted Clancy, professor of electrical and computer engineering, and Xinming Huang, professor of electrical and computer engineering, are developing wireless sensors to improve the performance of prosthetics for individuals with upper limb amputations.

This article headlined the Worcester Business Journal highlighting how the university is receiving the funding for an initiative with Quinsigamond Community College to develop and run a curriculum for Greater Worcester public school students. President Leshin praised the initiative of bringing together public and private partners along with higher education. "When these three sectors can come together effectively, powerful things can happen," Leshin said.

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