WPI’s MS in Biomedical Engineering program lets you tailor your studies so you can delve deeply into the groundbreaking research that helps you make advances in healthcare. Working on project-centered studies and collaborative research opportunities, you’ll apply engineering concepts to medicine and biology in ways that challenge and excite you.

With extensive resources to support research, and in a region rich with biomedical industries, you’ll have the chance to partner with renowned faculty, peers, and local companies to solve real-world problems. You’ll graduate with original technical and scientific work so you can move into career paths as varied as law, nursing, and medical school.

biomedical

Curriculum

In small classes, research groups, and collaborative labs, students in the MS in Biomedical Engineering program have the advantages of combining WPI’s long history in engineering excellence with our commitment to advanced investments in the life sciences.

With our rigorous but flexible curriculum, you’ll be positioned to apply traditional engineering concepts and foundations in constantly evolving fields, such as healthcare. Requirements include course work in biomedical engineering, life sciences, advanced mathematics, multidisciplinary electives, a graduate seminar, and a thesis.

Research projects in our cutting-edge laboratories are diverse—from biomedical sensors and instrumentation to cardiovascular tissue engineering. 

Research

Faculty Profiles

Faculty Profiles

Dirk Albrecht

Assistant Professor
Biomedical Engineering
My research is in the area of microtechnology and neuroscience, with a focus on developing quantitative tools to study how neural signals govern behavior. My laboratory aims to investigate the molecular and genetic basis of neural circuit function and dynamics, to develop bioinformatic tools for analysis of high-content neural data, and to design rapid cellular and whole-organism screens for therapeutic drugs and genetic modulators affecting neural disease.
George D. Pins

Associate Professor
Biomedical Engineering
The overall objective of my research is to create bioengineered scaffolds to enhance the regeneration of damaged tissues and organs. Specifically, my laboratory uses biomimetic design strategies and novel fabrication processes to develop three-dimensional constructs that emulate native tissue architecture and cellular microenvironments. We use these scaffolds to characterize the roles of extracellular matrix (ECM) cues and topographic features in modulating cellular functions, including adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and tissue remodeling.
Karen Troy

Associate Professor
Biomedical Engineering
The ability of our biological tissues to adapt to their mechanical environment, and the ways in which our tissues are well suited for their own mechanical role within the body, is a constant source of wonder to me. I am interested in understanding the mechanical signals that are experienced within the skeleton during different types of physical activity, understanding what features of these signals stimulate bone to adapt its structure, and in developing noninvasive methods to quantify bone strength.
Kwonmoo Lee

Assistant Professor
Biomedical Engineering
My research interest focuses on developing quantitative live cell imaging methodologies to characterize dynamics and coordination of molecular/cellular events related with cytoskeleton organization and dynamics. Using these methods, my lab studies how cells sense, react, and harness mechanic forces in physiological/pathophysiological processes such as brain development and cancer metastasis. Ultimately, I want to develop novel therapeutics based on our mechanobiological understanding of cellular processes.

Getting Involved

Getting Involved

You’ll find a welcoming and inclusive campus here. WPI’s grad students have a lively student community with many clubs and events, including intramural sports and an active Graduate Student Government.

You may participate in clubs on campus or explore the campus-based professional organizations like the Biomedical Engineering Society.

Students organizing project tasks with sticky notes on a whiteboard

After Graduation