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Life can be hard sometimes, but the WPI community is here with a helping hand and support. In our continued efforts to #BeRealTogether, students, faculty, and staff shared their real-world experiences, insights, and quotes, all touching upon how they effectively navigate their own mental health and wellness.

Nick Miragliotta ’23

I’ve found that the best mental health support for me is being a part of tight-knit student groups. Some of the people that support me the most I've met through clubs and organizations; they’re great to lean on since they can empathize with what I'm going through.”

Jacquelyn Lopez ’23

I always find myself de-stressing with bullet journaling because it not only holds me accountable, but serves as a place where I can write down everything I'm thinking about...it’s also helped me practice contentment, serving as a daily gratitude log to remind myself of all the things I have to be grateful for.”

Zoe Januszewski '22

I was raised to be a giver, but sometimes this drains me and affects my mental health. In moments of stress, I find relief through self-reflection, my favorite music, and baking sweets.”

Robert Brodin '23

I’ve found that nature and spending time outside walking in Worcester help when I’m anxious or stressed. Taking a break from work and spending time by yourself is so important to avoid burnout.”

Robbie Oleynick ’24

You are a piece of this beautiful puzzle of a WPI community. Even if you don't know where you fit in, the puzzle will never be complete without you. It's never too late to focus on you, to ask for help, or to search for the gap in our puzzle where you belong.”

Liz Chirico, University Advancement

I have suffered from anxiety for most of my adult life. Talking to a trusted friend and/or therapist is the best method I have found to help work through the difficulties…My anxiety will never disappear but with help I have learned how to live with it. You are not alone, and you are not a burden for needing help.”

Being on the Mental Health and Well-Being Task Force has given me an opportunity to try and make a positive impact on the WPI community...I care so deeply about each person on campus.
Danielle Upton ’22
The early days of the pandemic threw me into a very dark headspace. Thankfully I have a trusted group of friends that I share everything with. They were the first to realize I was in trouble and urged me to call my prescriber. Always keep lines open.
Sharon, Information Technology
In moments of stress, I find relief through trying to help others…it is not impossible for someone to come along and help you too. You just showed someone else that it’s possible, and someone is out there who will help you too. You are not alone.
Andy Li ’22
Try to find some things that consistently help you deal with any of these issues and problems as they come up…You have to find what makes you happy and healthy here, and there are a plethora of things at WPI that can help you do that.
Stephen Davis ’23
Take things one step at a time.
Kersten Prince
I hope that you find a quote that guides you in your life as this one has helped shape me to be who I am today. The quote was by Jesse Jackson: ‘Never look down on anybody unless you’re helping them up.’
Bri Ross, University Advancement

How You Can Help Those in Need

The National Alliance on Mental Illness offers several suggestions about what we can do as individuals to help reduce the stigma of mental illness:

 

  • Talk openly about mental health, in person and on social media
  • Educate yourself and others—respond to misperceptions or negative comments by sharing facts and experiences
  • Be conscious of language—remind people that words matter
  • Encourage equality between physical and mental illness—draw comparisons to how they would treat someone with cancer or diabetes
  • Show compassion for those with mental illness  
  • Be honest about treatment; normalize mental health treatment and treat it just like other healthcare treatment
  • Let the media know when they’re using stigmatizing language or presenting stories of mental illness in a stigmatizing way