Undergraduate Courses

BUS 1010. LEADERSHIP PRACTICE

  • Cat. I Leadership is a critical role in any global, technological organization. This course explores how the concepts of creativity, entrepreneurial and critical thinking, emotional and self-awareness, passion, diversity, communication, and ethics inform and affect leadership practice. The course considers a variety of contemporary leadership challenges including how leaders work effectively across cultural, technological, and disciplinary boundaries, how leaders foster new ideas and bring them to fruition, how they communicate effectively and persuasively to diverse stakeholders, and how they make decisions that are both ethical and effective. The course is designed to 1) increase students' awareness of their own leadership styles, 2) examine the responsibilities of leadership, and 3) determine best practices in leadership.

BUS 1020. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS DECISIONS

  • Cat. I The global nature of business is indisputable. This course introduces the students to the complexity of the global environment and adopts a multi-dimensional view (cultural, economic, social, legal, political, and technological) of world economy. It promotes understanding the global environment as integrative forces affecting the success or failure of today’s businesses and fosters a global perspective. Topics may include an overview of the world economy, comparative advantage and international trade, cultural distance, FDI/ globalization theory, outsourcing and global supply chain coordination, political and country risk, the global monetary system and currency risk, legal and ethical issues, and risk management.

BUS 2020. THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS DECISIONS

  • Cat. I This course addresses the impact of law on business. The course covers fundamental areas of business law, such as torts, contracts, intellectual property, and legal forms of business organizations, and their effects on business decisions. Particular attention is paid to technology-based enterprises where global business issues intersect with law.

BUS 2060. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR DECISION MAKING

  • Cat. I This course provides students with an understanding of the primary financial statements used for internal and external business decision-making in start-up firms and large corporations. It emphasizes underlying accounting concepts captured in financial statements, while highlighting the interdependence among these statements. The course will cover analytical techniques, such as ratio analyses and sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of changes in strategy and outcomes on efficiency and effectiveness measures. It also describes the various users of internal and external financial statements, and the potential conflicts between these various stakeholders.

BUS 2070. RISK ANALYSIS FOR DECISION MAKING

  • Cat. I Financial and operational risks are omnipresent in small entrepreneurial enterprises and in the corporate world. All firms, large and small, must be able to manage risk to create value. This course introduces students to enterprise risk and prepares them to act in the presence of risk. The course will sensitize students to two significant types of risk (namely, financial and operational risk), provide students with tools for assessing risk and minimizing risk exposure, and prepare students to take risk into account when making decisions as leaders, managers, and individuals.

BUS 2080. DATA ANALYSIS FOR DECISION MAKING

  • Cat. I This course explores the use of data mining and analytics to create business intelligence and use it for improving internal operations and understanding customers and supply chains. It provides an introduction to the concepts and methods of data analysis for decision-making. Students will learn a comprehensive set of spreadsheet skills and tools, including how to design, build, test, and use spreadsheets for business analyses. Students will also develop an understanding of the uses of business data analyses for decision-making, forecasting, and obtaining and maintaining a competitive advantage. Industrial Engineering majors may not receive credit for both BUS 2080 and MA 2210.

BUS 210X. INTRODUCTION TO CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

  • This course will cover the basics of corporate environmental sustainability with some introduction of social sustainability. The world has come under increasing environmental and social pressures. Corporations strategically and operationally influence the natural environment and social systems. We will offer the theory and practice of how organizations need to function to help decouple economic well-being from environmental degradation. Topics will include building sustainability strategy, green marketing and finance, sustainable supply chains, sustainability performance measurement and monitoring, and other emergent topics. Recommended Background: None

BUS 3010. CREATING VALUE THROUGH INNOVATION

  • Cat. I This course focuses on the ways value can be created and captured through innovation. Focusing on the assessment of customers, organizational capabilities, and competition, students will consider a variety of different types of innovations and their associated ethical and financial value propositions. Students will learn analytic tools to successfully assess and commercialize technology, product, and service innovations in a variety of contexts.

BUS 3020. ACHIEVING EFFECTIVE OPERATIONS

  • Cat. I Operations are embedded in a constantly changing network of relationships with various stakeholders including customers and suppliers. Within the organization, scarce resources (including financial, human, and technological) need to be ethically allocated and aligned with strategic goals. This course focuses on process analysis, design, and implementation within the constraints of stakeholder networks and available resources.

BUS 4030. ACHIEVING STRATEGIC EFFECTIVENESS

  • Cat. I Every successful business has a strategy for how it provides value and earns profit within its particular industry. Focusing on the contexts of technology, innovation and entrepreneurship, this course develops analytic approaches for assessing the various aspects of strategy such as the competitive environment, the network of stakeholders, ethical implications, investor motivation, operational execution, and financial projections that are necessary to create a complete business plan. This class is optimally taken while the MQP is in progress.

BUS 4300. SENIOR SEMINAR

  • Cat. I This course is designed for the senior student who wishes to acquire or strengthen important skills needed for organizational success. Among the subjects covered is power in organizations, what it is, and how to acquire and appropriately use it. Additionally, this course emphasizes presentation skills, organizational etiquette, cross-cultural communication, and the knowledge of current events. The student will be expected to be familiar with and use all forms of media information for both individual and group projects. The course may be counted as a 4000-level elective for MG, MGE, or MIS, or as a Free Elective for any student at WPI. Recommended Background: Senior standing.

ETR 1100. ENGINEERING INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

  • Cat. I In the modern competitive and global world confronting today’s engineers, innovation and entrepreneurship (I&E) are increasingly important perspectives for every engineering career. Individuals proficient in I&E are likely to possess unique competitive advantage over those who do not. This course develops the foundation for developing such proficiency by examining the functional roles of the business/commercial aspects of engineering disciplines as well as establishing a basis for innovative thinking. Specific cases where I&E has led to new products innovation and new enterprise development will supplement course materials.

ETR 2900. SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP

  • Cat. I This course will introduce students to the concept of social entrepreneurship and the ways in which social entrepreneurs are addressing complex social problems with their entrepreneurial ventures. Students will be exposed to the challenges and rewards of running a social enterprise. They will learn valuable business and entrepreneurial tools that can be applied to the design of sustainable social business models. Topics include social opportunity recognition and evaluation, business models in the social sector, social impact assessment, the double-bottom line, scalability of solutions, organizational forms and structures, and social venture financing. Suggested background: Familiarity with concepts of creativity, innovation, entrepreneurial and critical thinking, ethics, cross-cultural relations, and social problems (BUS 1010, BUS 1020, BUS 2060 or equivalent).

ETR 2910. ECONOMICS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

  • Cat. I This course is designed to provide an introduction to economics, an introduction to entrepreneurship, and an understanding of the linkages between economics and entrepreneurship. Students will apply these concepts to the assessment of opportunities that might arise from participation in WPI projects. Students will engage in exploring how economics and entrepreneurship can inform opportunity assessment within an ambiguous and uncertain context. These decisions are always made with incomplete information and there is typically no single correct answer but rather multiple possible answers -- each with pluses and minuses. Recommended background: None Students may not earn credits for both ECON 2910/ETR 2910 and ECON 291X/ETR 291X

ETR 3633. ENTREPRENEURIAL SELLING

  • Cat. I Selling is a major part of business life, but it is especially important for those who are launching a new venture. They need to sell their business plan to potential investors. Later they need to sell their product or service to a customer. Ultimately they need to create an organization that is focused on meeting customer and other stakeholder needs through effective selling disciplines. This course will examine the elements of the sales cycle in terms of preparation, market research, prospecting, objection handling, closing, techniques for motivating the sales professional and formulation of strategy for the successful selling transaction. As part of the course students will be required to prepare individual sales presentations, one to secure investment for a new venture and one to sell a product or service to a customer. Guest speakers may be used on topics such as sales coaching, inside sales management, and to deliver sales effectiveness training.

ETR 3915. ENTREPRENEURIAL BUSINESS MODELS

  • Cat. I This course is designed to foster an understanding of entrepreneurship in the context of innovation and the global economy. It also provides the theoretical and practical knowledge for the preparation of business models. The course includes opportunity identification, team formation, capital and other resource acquisition, exit strategies and other aspects of new venture creation. Suggested background: Basic knowledge of economics (OIE 2850), business law (BUS 2020), accounting (BUS 2060), innovation (BUS 3010), and operations management (BUS 3020). Students may not receive credit for both ETR 3910 and ETR 3915. Students may not receive credit for both ETR 3920 and ETR 3915.

ETR 4930. GROWING AND MANAGING NEW VENTURES

  • Cat. I One of the most troublesome aspects of entrepreneurship is running the business once it is started. This course focuses on techniques to grow the new venture and how to manage both the growth and operations. Considerable emphasis will be placed on expanding existing markets, finding new markets, anticipating the next generation of products, and managing cash flow. Recommended background for this course consists of five of the following: ACC 2101, BUS 1010, BUS 1020, BUS 2020, BUS 2060, BUS 4030, BUS 3010, BUS 3020, ETR 3910, ETR 3920, OIE 2850.

FIN 1250. PERSONAL FINANCE

  • Cat. I This course is designed to help the student make well-informed judgments when faced with personal financial decisions. Such decisions are growing in number and complexity, and both individuals and families need a considerable degree of financial expertise in order to utilize optimally their limited incomes. Principal topics include: insurance (medical, life, automobile and disability), consumer credit, estate planning, taxation, personal investments (real estate, securities, etc.), social security legislation and personal financial planning.

FIN 3300. FINANCE, RISK ANALYTICS & TECHNOLOGY

  • FIN 3300. FINANCE, RISK ANALYTICS & TECHNOLOGY. Cat. I This course provides an in-depth overview of finance, methods in risk analytics, and the importance of financial technology in today’s global and interconnected marketplace. In this course, students learn the most up-to-date methods and tools that are used globally within the financial services industry. Topics covered include portfolio formation based on personal and risk preferences, the formation and backtesting of trading strategies, fundamental and technical analysis, the mutual fund and hedge fund industries, and cryptocurrencies. These topics are explored using big data and risk analytics methods such as time series modeling, prediction models, volatility risk forecasting, and the identification and distinction between market-wide and industry-specific risks. Throughout the course, students will learn how to use Bloomberg to analyze data across market sectors to make financial decisions. This course is especially suited to those seeking careers where data analytics and information technologies play critical roles in finance or the management of risks. Topics covered in this course appear regularly in examinations required for professional certifications, such as the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) certification. The risk analytics portion of this course also covers topics that appear regularly in the financial mathematics examination by the Society of Actuaries (SOA). Recommended Background: Introductory business and finance topics such as those found in BUS 2060.

MIS 3720. BUSINESS DATA MANAGEMENT

  • This course introduces students to the theory and practice of database management and the application of database software to implement business information systems that support managerial and operational decision making. Special topics covered include relational data models, query languages, normalization, locking, concurrency control and recovery. The course covers data administration and the design of data tables for computerized databases. Students will use a commercial database package to design and implement a small business database application. Recommended background: CS 2119 or equivalent knowledge.

MIS 3740. ORGANIZATIONAL APPLICATIONS OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS

  • Cat. I Students taking this course will develop an understanding of how organizations can effectively use telecommunications technology to enhance business functionality. Students will analyze the development of organizational communications infrastructures and their use for the development of “virtual” organizational structures and to support globally-distributed organizations. The course will begin with a survey of the concepts and technologies which form the basis of a business telecommunications system and which allow the merging of voice, data and video in an integrated multimedia communications structures. Recommended background: BUS 3010.

MIS 4084. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE

  • Cat. I This course provides an introduction to the technologies and techniques for organizing, analyzing, visualizing, and presenting data about business operations in a way that creates business value, and prepares students to be knowledgeable producers and consumers of business intelligence. During the course, students will study a variety of business decisions that can be improved by analyzing large volumes of data about customers, sales, operations, and business performance. Students will employ commercially available business intelligence software to organize, summarize, visualize, and analyze data sets and make recommendations to decision makers based on the results. The course explores the technical challenges of conducting analytics on various forms of data including social media data and the managerial challenges of creating value from business intelligence expertise deployed in organizations. The course includes business cases, in-class discussion, hands-on analyses of business data, and methods for presenting results to decision makers. It is designed for any student interested in analyzing data to support business decision-making, including students whose primary focus is Management Information Systems, Marketing, Operations and Industrial Engineering, Business, Management Engineering, Data Science, or Computer Science. Recommended background: Previous knowledge in data management, such as that provided by MIS 3720 Business Data Management or CS 3431 Database Systems I.

MIS 4720. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

  • Cat. I This course integrates students’ background in MIS in a one-term project focusing on development of creative solutions to open-ended business and manufacturing problems. The project will utilize systems analysis and design tools such as systems development life cycle, feasibility study, cost-benefit analysis, structured analysis and design. Students will acquire the skills necessary to analyze, develop, implement, and document real-life information systems. Students must be able to organize themselves and the project to complete their work within a seven week term. It is recommended that MIS majors take this course in preparation for their MQP. Recommended background: MIS 3720.

MIS 4741. USER EXPERIENCE AND DESIGN

  • This course focuses on the newest developments in the field of user experience (UX) (e.g., the use of physiological measures such as eye tracking in UX design) and provides an introduction to various methods used in cutting-edge research laboratories to study user experience. Both theoretical concepts and practical skills with appropriate development tools will be addressed within the scope of the class through hands-on projects and assignments. Students will develop a plan to innovate with user experience and will implement a simple prototype of their plan. Recommended background: BUS 3010, CS 2102 or ability to program in a higher level programming language.

MKT 3640. MANAGEMENT OF PROCESS AND PRODUCT INNOVATION

  • This course is based on the hypothesis that high performance firms depend on a sustainable pattern of new and innovative processes and products. Successful companies are examined in regard to their strategies for innovation and technology transfer. Technology alliances among industry, universities, and government are considered in order to increase the leverage of the individual firm. Benchmarking and commercialization from research to actualization is discussed through cases and examples. Recommended background: BUS 2070 or OIE 2850.

OBC 3354. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND CHANGE

  • Cat. I This course focuses on the basic knowledge and processes required of managers to understand behavior in organizations and to apply this knowledge to organizational change. Topics include communication and trust, power and leadership, group and intergroup processes, conflict and conflict management, and work and organizational design. Students apply their knowledge of organizational behavior to the analysis, implementation, and leadership of organizational change. Lectures, video presentations, case studies, group discussions and mini-projects are employed to introduce and illustrate the basic elements of organizational behavior and change. Recommended background: None

OBC 4367. LEADERSHIP, ETHICS, AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

  • Cat. I This upper-level course invites students to consider the importance of ethics, corporate governance, and corporate social responsibility for leading global enterprises effectively. Students will be asked to reflect on their own leadership styles and to engage the complex, ethical dimensions of leadership in modern organizations. The course will engage students using lecture, video presentations, case studies, guest speakers, fieldwork, and mini-projects. Recommended background: None. (Students may not receive credit for both OBC 4366 and OBC 4367.)

OIE 2850. ENGINEERING ECONOMICS

  • Cat. I To aid all engineering students in understanding economics and business constraints on engineering decision making. Topics include evaluation of alternative; the six time-value-of-money factors; present worth, annual cash flow and rate-of-return analysis; incremental analysis; depreciation and income taxes; replacement analysis; inflation; handling probabilistic events; public economy; break-even and minimum cost points; and foreign exchange.

OIE 3405. WORK SYSTEMS AND FACILITIES PLANNING

  • Cat. I This course covers the fundamentals of developing efficient layouts for production and service facilities. Methods analysis, work measurement, material handling and material flow analysis are also covered. Mathematical models and computer tools are used to assist decision-making. Recommended background: BUS 2080 and BUS 3020.

OIE 3410. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT IN SUPPLY CHAINS

  • This course in an introduction to the planning and controlling the material flow into, through, and out of an organization. It explains fundamental relationships among the activities that occur in the supply chain from suppliers to customers. In particular, the course addresses types of manufacturing systems, demand management and forecasting, master production scheduling, materials requirements planning, capacity management, inventory management, distribution resource planning, JIT and lean principles, and other current topics that are pertinent to managing the material flow of supply chains. Recommended background: MA 1020, 1021, 1022, 2611 and BUS 3020.

OIE 3420. QUALITY PLANNING, DESIGN AND CONTROL

  • Cat. I This course provides students with the analytical and management tools necessary to solve manufacturing and service quality problems. Topics include customer needs and quality, quality and cost relationships, process capability analysis, statistical process control, control charts for variables and attributes, design of experiments, and other Six Sigma problem solving methodology. Recommended background: BUS 3020 and MA 2612 or consent of the instructor.

OIE 3460. SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS

  • Cat. I This course covers the application of simulation to a variety of managerial problems with examples from operations management, industrial engineering and manufacturing engineering. It introduces the student to the concepts of computer simulation, with an emphasis on the design of a simulation experiment and statistical interpretation of its results. It will discuss simulation of queueing models, inventory and industrial dynamics, and gaming situations. The role and use of computers for the execution of simulations will also be highlighted. A commercial simulation language such as Arena will be used to solve problems from the manufacturing and service industries. Recommended background: CS 1004 and MA 2612.

OIE 3510. STOCHASTIC MODELS

  • Cat. I This is an introductory course in probabilistic models and decision-making under risk, with applications to engineering and management decision making. The course first covers quantitative methods for assessing and evaluating risks and how they are used in decision making. Decision making under risk is examined across a wide set of management and engineering problems. The course then introduces a set of probabilistic models commonly used in decision making and operations improvement; specifically, emphasis is placed on Markov chains, Poisson processes, and queuing theory, and their applications in manufacturing and service systems are illustrated. Recommended background: knowledge of calculus and introductory probability and statistics.

OIE 3600. SCRIPTING FOR PROCESS AND PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT

  • Cat. I This course will train students to think critically about the effective and efficient use of computational tools to enhance everyday organizational performance. Students will learn how to create value through productivity tools that will likely include advanced spreadsheet functionality, regular expressions, macros, and scripting. The course will make use of software including Microsoft Excel with Visual Basic for Applications, Python, and advanced text editors, applied to a variety of domains, to improve students' ability to automate processes and productivity. Students can receive credits for both OIE 3600 and either CS 2119 or CS 2102 or CS 2103. For IE majors, if one of the CS courses previously listed is used as a required programming course, then OIE 3600 can be used as an IE elective. Recommended Background: Some previous exposure to analytical problem solving (such as found in BUS 2080 Data Analysis for Decision Making or MA 2210 Mathematical Methods in Decision Making)

OIE 4410. CASE STUDIES IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

  • Cat. I A number of in-depth case studies in operations and industrial engineering are analyzed. The cases will cover both manufacturing and service systems ranging from production system design to operations planning and control. Recommended background: BUS 2080, BUS 3020, OIE 3410, and OIE 3510.

OIE 4420. PRACTICAL OPTIMIZATION: METHODS AND APPLICATIONS

  • Cat. I This course covers the use of practical computational methods to solve constrained optimization problems from industry. Optimization theory and algorithms related to linear and integer programming will be discussed, with primary emphasis placed upon computationally solving applications in the industrial, operational, manufacturing, and service sectors. Both proprietary and open-source optimization software will be used, including spreadsheet solvers (e.g., Excel Solver, OpenSolver), industrial-strength optimization packages (e.g., CPLEX, GUROBI), and other interfaces (e.g., AMPL, OPL, GMPL). Students will be expected to model problems and interpret their results; where applicable, sensitivity analysis, duality and additional techniques will be utilized to gain managerial insight from developed models and solutions. Cases from industries such as health care, supply chain management, financial services and analytics will be used for illustrations, discussions, and exercises. Recommended background: Familiarity with some basic linear programming (BUS 2080, MA 2210, MA 3231, or equivalent)

OIE 4460. GLOBAL PLANNING AND LOGISTICS

  • This case-based course will examine methods and strategies for managing and controlling material movement, with particular emphasis on international operations, from the purchase of production materials to the control of work in process to the distribution of the finished product. Strategies that will be discussed include the design of international distribution networks, the use of third-party logistics providers, and the creation of links between logistic systems and marketing to create competitive advantage. The course will also explore tactical issues that must be managed to pursue a logistics strategy successfully, including choices regarding means of transportation, packaging, and inventory policies. Underlying themes of the course will be the use of information technologies (such as electronic data interchange and bar coding) and mathematical models to support logistics decision-making. Recommended background: BUS 3020 and one of the following: BUS 2070 or OIE 2850 or consent of the professor.

Graduate Courses

ACC 500. ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE FUNDAMENTALS

  • This course serves as a foundational introduction to financial accounting and financial analysis. It is designed to help students master the technical skills needed in a graduate management curriculum and in business to analyze financial statements and disclosures for use in financial analysis. Students will learn how to read and interpret the three most common financial statements: the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. Students will also learn how to apply ratios that capture key elements of a firm's performance. Students will also develop an understanding of certain essential concepts in mathematical financial analysis, including net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), payback, future value, and bond and options pricing. (Students cannot get credit for ACC 500 and ACC 503)

ACC 502. FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE AND STRATEGIC DECISION-MAKING

  • This course builds on students’ knowledge of financial statements and takes a managerial accounting approach to present how firms plan and implement strategy. Accounting, economics, and psychology theories provide the framework for cost analysis, strategic decision-making, and planning under uncertainty. Management control systems will guide students to work with uncertainty. The course will emphasize cost behaviors, setting and meeting cost targets, assessing strategic initiatives, forecasting and budgeting, and the use of assumptions in the calculations of significant revenue and expense projections. Students will apply theories and best practices through simulations and case analyses. (Prerequisite: ACC 500) (Students cannot get credit for ACC 502 and ACC 503)

ACC 503. FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR STRATEGIC DECISION- MAKING

  • This course builds on Financial Information and Management. It takes a managerial approach and combines publicly available and internal financial reports to help managers measure and manage firm performance. Accounting, economics, and psychology theories provide the framework for planning, evaluating performance, understanding moral hazard and how choices of what to measure affect behaviors and outcomes. The course will emphasize cost behaviors and the use of assumptions in the calculations of cost of goods sold and other significant revenue and expense accounts. Students will apply statistical methods to the analysis of cost behavior and the balanced scorecard. (Prerequisite: FIN 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

ACC 505. PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT AND MANAGEMENT

  • This course strengthens students’ understanding of strategic finance/Financial Information & Management in order to monitor and revise strategy. It takes a managerial accounting approach to enable managers to measure and manage firm financial and non-financial performance. Accounting, economics, and psychology theories provide the framework for understanding moral hazard, motivation, and aligning the interest of employees with the interest of the firm. The course will emphasize designing and applying management control systems tools such as the balanced scorecard and examine how choices of what to measure affect behaviors and outcomes. Students will apply theories and best practices through simulations and case analyses. (Prerequisites : ACC 500, ACC 502, FIN 503 & FIN 504)

BUS 500. BUSINESS LAW, ETHICS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

  • This course combines analysis of the structure, function and development of the law most important to the conduct of business with an examination of the ethical and social context in which managers make decisions. Emphasizing the social responsibility considerations of all business stakeholders, the course focuses on practical applications via extensive use of case studies. Students will gain a sound understanding of the basic areas of U.S. and international law including: intellectual property law; business formation and organization; international business law; securities regulation; cyber law and e-commerce; antitrust law; employment law and environmental law.

BUS 501. INTEGRATING BUSINESS CONCEPTS TO LEAD INNOVATION

  • This course will help students practice integration of the concepts learned in the core courses in team based projects. There will be case studies, simulations and other activities emphasizing different aspects of business problems. These activities will challenge teams to provide innovative solutions. Important strategy theories and concepts will be discussed to help students integrate varying knowledge domains. (Prerequisites: FIN 500, BUS 500, FIN 501, MIS 500, MKT 500, OBC 500 and OIE 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

BUS 517. GRADUATE QUALIFYING PROJECT IN MANAGEMENT (GQP)

  • This capstone course integrates management theory and practice, and incorporates a number of skills and tools acquired in the M.B.A. curriculum. The medium is a major team-based project in the form of a corporate venture or green field venture. In addition to a written report, the project is formally presented to a panel of outside experts including serial entrepreneurs and investors. (Prerequisites: ACC 503, BUS 500, BUS 501, ETR 500, FIN 500, FIN 501, MIS 500, MKT 500, OBC 500, OBC 501 and OIE 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

BUS 522. GLOBAL BUSINESS EXPERIENCE

  • Business is increasingly global. To be successful one must understand the customs and traditions of the regions in which they are operating. This course provides students with insight into different countries and business environments and includes an international trip where students will spend a week to 10 days on the ground in the featured region meeting with business, government and/or academic leaders; touring company sites; and learning about the region. Prior to the trip students will study business history, culture and current topics related to the featured region. Guest speakers will often be incorporated. Following the trip students will typically write reflective papersand deliver presentations.

BUS 545. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH SYSTEMS

  • This course introduces students to the structure of health systems (suppliers, providers, and payers), exploring processes, structure, and infrastructure elements. Topics include an overview of care models and processes, health information technologies, privacy and other regulations, and payment mechanisms. The course also explores future visions of health systems, focused around wellness, patient-centeredness, and value, supported by new technologies and care models.

BUS 546. MANAGING TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION

  • This course studies successful innovations and how firms must enhance their ability to develop and introduce new products and processes. The course will discuss a practical model of the dynamics of industrial innovation. Cases and examples will be discussed for products in which cost and product performance are commanding factors. The important interface among R&D/manufacturing/marketing is discussed. International technology transfer and joint venture issues are also considered.

BUS 590. STRATEGY IN TECHNOLOGY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS

  • This course provides a summary overview of strategic management, with a focus on integrating the core curriculum to develop competitive advantage at the corporate and business unit level. Topics include the role of the CEO in the organization, industry analysis, the use of core competence to drive business development and exit decisions, causes of organizational inertia that cause the loss of competitive advantage, the impact of technology on strategy, the links between strategy and organizational design, and the social responsibility of the firm. The course also serves as the initial phase of BUS 599 (Capstone) and is designed to be taken immediately preceding that class. (Prerequisites: ACC 500, ACC 502, ACC 505, BUS 500, FIN 503, FIN 504, MIS 500, MKT 500, OBC 505, OBC 506 and OIE 501 or equivalent content, or instructor consent) (Students cannot get credit for BUS 590 and BUS 501)

BUS 598. AUDIT: INTRO TO HEALTH SYS LDR

  • The student should have a well-developed proposal before approaching a faculty member about an independent study.

BUS 599. CAPSTONE PROJECT

  • This capstone course integrates management theory and practice, and incorporates a number of skills and tools acquired in the M.B.A. curriculum. The medium is a major team-based project in the form of a corporate venture or green field venture. In addition to a written report, the project is formally presented to a panel of outside experts including serial entrepreneurs and investors. (Prerequisites: ACC 500, ACC 502, ACC 505, BUS 500, BUS 590, FIN 503, FIN 504, MIS 500, MKT 500, OBC 505, OBC 506 and OIE 501 or equivalent content, or instructor consent) (Students cannot get credit for BUS 599 and BUS 517)

ETR 500. ENTREPRENURSHIP AND INNOVATION

  • Entrepreneurship involves many activities, including identifying and exploiting opportunities, creating and launching new ventures, introducing new products and new services to new markets. It is based on implementing innovations within existing organizations and creating new opportunities. This course is intended to introduce students to entrepreneurial thinking and methods of executing their ideas. Topics include recognizing and evaluating opportunities, forming new venture teams, preparing business and technology commercialization plans, obtaining resources, identifying execution action scenarios, and developing exit strategies.

ETR 593. TECHNOLOGY COMMERCIALIZATION:THEORY, STRATEGY AND PRACTICE

  • In the modern world of global competition the ability to utilize technological innovation is increasingly important. This course will examine the sources of new technology, the tools to evaluate new technologies, the process of intellectual property transfer, and the eventual positioning of the resultant products and services in the commercial market. Its purpose is to improve the probability of success of this discipline in both existing organizational models and early stage ventures. Specific cases studies of successful technology commercialization processes will be used to supplement the course materials.

ETR 596. SELLING AND SALES

  • Selling is a major part of our business and professional lives. This is especially important for those who are launching new ventures. Business propositions need to be presented to (and need to be sold to) potential investors, employees, colleagues, and certainly potential employers. Later there is a need to sell products or services to customers. Common to all is a sales process and organization model that can be developed that is focused on meeting customer and other stakeholder needs through effective selling disciplines.

FIN 500. FINANCIAL INFORMATION AND MANAGEMENT

  • This course develops expertise in financial decision-making by focusing on frequently used financial accounting information and the conceptual framework for managing financial problems. Students are introduced to the accounting and financial concepts, principles and methods for preparing, analyzing and evaluating financial information, for the purpose of managing financial resources of a business enterprise and investment decisions. The course adopts a decision-maker perspective by emphasizing the relations among financial data, their underlying economic events, corporate finance issues, and the responses by market participants.

FIN 501. ECONOMICS FOR MANAGERS

  • This course covers fundamental microeconomic and macroeconomic theories to help managers formulate effective business decisions. Current events are used in addition to economic theories to explain the concepts of the market system, gains from trade, supply and demand, consumer behavior, firm behavior, market structure, long-run economic growth, economic cycle, financial system, monetary policy, and fiscal policy. Students will complete a “Market Watch” project to learn to explain and predict changes in macroeconomic indicators, including gross domestic product, interest rates, global stock indices, commodity prices and foreign exchange rates.

FIN 503. FINANCIAL DECISION-MAKING FOR VALUE CREATION

  • This course develops and enhances the student’s ability to implement and clearly communicate a firm’s financial decisions related to value creation. The course covers capital structure optimization, cost of capital; capital allocation and investment strategies, enterprise risk, project and firm valuation, and international financial management. The course adopts a decision-maker’s perspective by emphasizing the relationships among a firm’s strategic objectives, financial accounting and financial statement data, economic events, responses by market participants and other impacted constituencies, and corporate finance theory. The course also builds on these practical finance skills by incorporating team-based assignments, real-world simulations, and a variety of financial modeling tools. (Students cannot get credit for FIN 503 and FIN 500)

FIN 504. FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS AND VALUATION

  • This course develops expertise in financial decision-making by focusing on financial accounting information. The course presents a comprehensive framework for financial statement analysis and valuation. Through hands-on, practical application of various tools for financial analysis (e.g., ratio analysis & financial modeling using Excel and other resources) students will develop the expertise needed to use a firms' financial statements to draw an understanding of its performance and to provide a basis for making reasonable valuation estimates. Students will learn to apply analytical techniques to develop forecasted financial statements and use the information to value a firm’s equity. The course will utilize team assignments, cases, simulations, and other applied exercises. (Prerequisites: ACC 500, ACC 502, & FIN 503)

FIN 522. FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, MARKETS & TECHNOLOGY

  • This course will examine financial institutions and the relationship between U.S. capital markets and global markets. The class is intended to help students understand the impact of financial intermediaries on the global economy, businesses, and consumers. The course will investigate the organization, structure, and performance of money and capital markets and institutions. The class will examine the major financial management issues confronting financial service firms (depository institutions, insurance companies, investment banks, mutual funds, hedge funds, and pension funds), and it will address the legal, regulatory, financial reform, and risk management issues facing these financial institutions and markets. Finally, the course will address the rapid evolution of the financial sector as a result of technology. We will consider how financial technology (“FinTech”) is being developed by startup technology firms and existing financial institutions may disrupt the financial sector through innovation in digital and electronic currencies, online finance and investment platforms, big data, and digital payment systems (among other topics).

MIS 500. INNOVATING WITH INFORMATION SYSTEMS

  • This course focuses on information technology and innovation. Topics covered are information technology and organizations, information technology and individuals (privacy, ethics, job security, job changes), information technology and information security, information technology within the organization (technology introduction and implementation), business process engineering and information technology between organizations (electronic data interchange and electronic commerce).This course provides the knowledge and skills to utilize existing and emerging information technology innovatively to create business opportunities.

MIS 571. DATABASE APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT

  • Business applications are increasingly centered on databases and the delivery of high-quality data throughout the organization. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of computer-based data management. It focuses on the design of database applications that will meet the needs of an organization and its managers. The course also covers data security, data integrity, data quality, and backup and recovery procedures. Students will be exposed to commercially available database management systems, such as MS/Access and Oracle. As a project during the course, students will design and implement a small database that meets the needs of some real-world business data application. The project report will include recommendations for ensuring security, integrity, and quality of the data.

MIS 573. SYSTEM DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

  • This course introduces students to the concepts and principles of systems analysis and design. It covers all aspects of the systems development life cycle from project identification through project planning and management, requirements identification and specification, process and data modeling, system architecture and security, interface design, and implementation and change management. Object-oriented analysis techniques are introduced. Students will learn to use an upper level CASE (computer-aided software engineering) tool, which will be employed in completing a real-world systems analysis and design project. (Prerequisite: MIS 571 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

MIS 576. PROJECT MANAGEMENT

  • This course presents the specific concepts, techniques and tools for managing projects effectively. The role of the project manager as team leader is examined, together with important techniques for controlling cost, schedules and performance parameters. Lectures, case studies and projects are combined to develop skills needed by project managers in today’s environment.

MIS 578. TELECOMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT

  • This course provides students with the technical and managerial background for developing and managing an organization’s telecommunications infrastructure. On the technical side, it covers the fundamentals of data transmission, local area networks, local internetworking and enterprise internetworking, and security. Coverage includes data communications and computer networking; local area communications topics such as cabling, and local area network hardware and software; and topics involved in wide area networking, such as circuit and packet switching, and multiplexing. On the managerial side, this course focuses on understanding the industry players and key organizations, and the telecommunications investment decisions in a business environment. Coverage includes issues in the national and international legal and regulatory environments for telecommunication s services.

MIS 581. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND STRATEGY

  • Fast-paced changes in technology require successful IS managers to quickly understand, adapt, and apply technology when appropriate. They must recognize the implications new technologies have on their employees and the organization as a whole. In particular, they must appreciate the internal (e.g., political and organizational culture) and external (e.g., laws, global concerns, and cultural issues) environments that these changes occur within and plan accordingly. This course focuses on the core IS capabilities that IS managers must consider when managing technology within their organization: business and IT vision, design of IT architecture, and IT service delivery. This course will build on the knowledge and skills gained from previous MIS courses. (Prerequisite: MIS 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

MIS 582. INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT

  • This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Information Security Management. It is designed to develop in students an understanding of and appreciation for the importance of information security to all enterprises, and to enable current and future managers to understand the important role that they must play in securing the enterprise. This course is appropriate for any student interested in gaining a managerial-level understanding of information security. A combination of readings, lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and discussion of real world events will be used to bridge the gap between theory and practice. The course will primarily explore the Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) of information security, along with other related topics. It will also explore the interaction between People, Process and Technology as the cornerstone of any effective information security program. Upon completion of this course, the student will have an in-depth understanding of the essential components of a comprehensive information security program, as well as an understanding of the technology at work behind the scenes.

MIS 583. USER EXPERIENCE APPLICATIONS

  • The course provides an introduction to various methods to study user experience, which includes the newest research in user experience theory and practice (e.g., the use of eye tracking in informing the design of webpages). Students will learn how businesses can benefit from user experience research to develop new or improve existing products and services. Both theoretical concepts and practical skills will be addressed within the scope of the class through hands-on projects and assignments. Both theoretical concepts and practical skills will be addressed within the scope of the class through hands-on projects and assignments (Recommended background: ability to program in a higher level programming language)

MIS 584. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE

  • Today’s business computing infrastructures are producing the large volumes of data organizations need to make better plans and decisions. This course provides an introduction to the technologies and techniques for organizing and analyzing data about business operations in a way that creates business value, and prepares students to be knowledgeable producers and consumers of business intelligence. During the course, students will study a variety of business decisions that can be improved by analyzing large volumes of data about customers, sales, operations, and business performance. Students will apply commercially available business intelligence software to analyze data sets and make recommendations based on the results. The course explores the technical challenges of organizing data for analysis and the managerial challenges of creating and deploying business intelligence expertise in organizations. The course includes business cases, in-class discussion, and hands-on analyses of business data. It is designed for any student interested in analyzing data to support business decision making, including students whose primary focus is IT, Marketing, Operations, or Business Management. (Prerequisite: MIS 571 or CS 542, or equivalent content, or consent of the instructor.)

MIS 585. USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN

  • Designing positive user experiences is becoming increasingly important in staying competitive in the marketplace. This course covers basic concepts and practical techniques for designing successful digital experiences. These concepts and methods are practiced through hands-on class exercise, assignments, and projects.

MIS 586. USER EXPERIENCE RESEARCH METHODS

  • In today’s increasingly connected and smart environments, understanding how people use and experience technologies is becoming crucial in designing successful technological products and services. This course covers various methodologies for conducting research in User Experience (UX) field. It covers both qualitative and quantitative methods for conducting UX research in academia and industry. Theoretical concepts and practical skills will be addressed within the scope of the class through hands-on projects and assignments.

MKT 500. MARKETING MANAGEMENT

  • This course addresses consumer and industrial decision-making, with emphasis on the development of products and services that meet customer needs. Topics covered include management and the development of distinctive competence, segmentation and target marketing, market research, competitor analysis and marketing information systems, product management, promotion, price strategy, and channel management. Students will learn how the elements of marketing strategy are combined in a marketing plan, and the challenges associated with managing products and services over the life cycle, including strategy modification and market exit.

MKT 561. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

  • This course provides an in-depth analysis of factors that affect purchase decisions and consumption in the marketplace. Topics covered include consumer behavior theory, an examination of attitude formation and value creation, the challenges of consumer protection, market research, and the influence of technology on consumer decision making. Students will learn how the elements of consumer behavior impact marketing strategy and decisions through case analysis and other activities.

MKT 562. MARKETING RESEARCH

  • This course is designed to equip students with research methods and tools that are used for marketing decision making. Students will learn to conduct, use, apply, interpret, and present marketing research in order to become effective decision makers. The topics covered in this course include problem formulation, research design, data collection methods, and finally presentation of a research plan. This course will be an activity-based course involving design and presentation of a marketing research plan. Basic knowledge of marketing concepts is assumed. (Prerequisite: MKT 500 or equivalent content, or consent of instructor.)

MKT 564. GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY MARKETING

  • Extending technology to global markets requires an understanding of consumer behavior in different cultures, and effective management of risk and overseas infrastructures. This course addresses the issues associated with technology application in new markets and includes the following topics: consumer behavior differences in international markets and the implications for the marketing mix, cultural differences that affect business practices in new markets, managing exchange rate fluctuation, factors that affect manufacturing and research location, the impact of local government on marketing decision making, and the use of strategic alliances to acquire expertise and manage risk in global market development. Knowledge of marketing management is assumed.

MKT 565. DIGITAL MARKETING

  • The rapid evolution of technology has led to increasingly well-informed buyers who are connected, communicative, and more in control than ever. This course discusses the theory and practice of digital marketing and its role in building relationships and, ultimately, driving sales. It examines digital technologies and their impact on business models, the marketing mix, branding, communication strategies, and distribution channels. Emphasis is placed on contemporary topics that face today’s marketing managers -- including online lead generation, search, social networking, and ecommerce -- and their application within a comprehensive, integrated digital marketing strategy. The course considers the opportunities and challenges faced in business-to-consumer and business-to-business markets. It covers latest research, current practices, and hands-on project work. (Prerequisite: MKT 500 or equivalent content, or consent of instructor.)

MKT 567. INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

  • This course provides students with an understanding of the role of integrated marketing communications in the overall marketing program and its contribution to marketing strategy. The tools of marketing communications include advertising, sales promotion, publicity, personal selling, public relations, trade shows, direct, and online marketing. Understanding the concepts and processes that organizations use in developing effective and synergistic marketing communications is useful for managers across functional disciplines. This course will also consider ethical issues of IMC.

MKT 568. DATA MINING BUSINESS APPLICATIONS

  • This course provides students with the key concepts and tools to turn raw data into useful business intelligence. A broad spectrum of business situations will be considered for which the tools of classical statistics and modern data mining have proven their usefulness. Problems considered will include such standard marketing research activities as customer segmentation and customer preference as well as more recent issues in credit scoring, churn management and fraud detection. Roughly half the class time will be devoted to discussions on business situations, data mining techniques, their application and their usage. The remaining time will comprise an applications laboratory in which these concepts and techniques are used and interpreted to solve realistic business problems. Some knowledge of basic marketing principles and basic data analysis is assumed.

MKT 569. PRODUCT AND BRAND MANAGEMENT

  • The conversion of technology into new products requires an understanding of how to develop a meaningful value proposition and integrate the development of a product with a marketing strategy that creates brand equity. This course will focus on the management of products, the implications of other marketing decisions on product and brand management, the management of product lines within the organization, including introduction, growth, and market exit. (Prerequisite: MKT 500 or equivalent content, or consent of instructor.)

OBC 500. GROUP AND INTERPERSONAL DYNAMICS IN COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS

  • This practice-based course simulates a complex organization with critical interdependencies at interpersonal, group, and intergroup levels. Students will be asked to make sense of their experiences through class discussions, individual reflection and readings in organization studies. This course is intended to be a student’s first course in organizational studies.

OBC 501. INTERPERSONAL AND LEADERSHIP SKILLS

  • This course considers effective interpersonal and leadership behaviors in technological organizations. Course material focuses on understanding, changing and improving our behaviors and those of others by examining our own practices and analyzing examples of leadership behaviors. The course also considers interpersonal and leadership behaviors in relation to teams, cultural diversity, and ethics in organizations. Assignments may include personal experiments, case analyses, individual and group projects and/or presentations. (Prerequisite: OBC 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

OBC 505. TEAMING AND ORGANIZING FOR INNOVATION

  • How do we navigate complex human systems in organizations? How do we foster innovation within organizations? In this course, we explore the paradoxes, opportunities, and hidden systemic challenges that arise on teams and projects, and in working across networks and within innovative organizations. Students will learn to more deftly manage the inherent challenges and opportunities of cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary teams; work through or avoid dysfunctional team and organizational conflicts; wrestle with ambiguity and uncertainty; negotiate change by learning to work with networks of power and influence; and analyze the individual, group, organizational and contextual dynamics that enable and constrain productive and innovative work in organizations. (Students cannot get credit for OBC 505 and OBC 500)

OBC 506. THE HEART OF LEADERSHIP: POWER, REFLECTION, AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

  • All of us hope to have positive, collaborative, and effective interactions with others — in our professional and personal lives. Yet often our interactions do not go as planned and it gets ugly: people behave irrationally and get emotional, communication stops, conflicts fester, and opportunities are left unrealized and obscured. This course develops skills for understanding and acting more powerfully, ethically, and mindfully in our interactions. These include analytic techniques for understanding emotional, biographical, and social-psychological reasons for our own and others behavior, and skills for paying attention to and managing the complex dynamics unfolding in interpersonal interactions. Students will learn to identify and reflect upon their own contributions to problematic interactions; design and execute better ways of interacting with others; and develop their own interpersonal strengths and collaborative capacities. (Prerequisite: OBC 505 or instructor consent) (Students cannot get credit for OBC 506 and OBC 501)

OBC 533. NEGOTIATIONS

  • This course focuses on improving the student's understanding of the negotiation process and effectiveness as a negotiator. Emphasizes issues related to negotiating within and on behalf of organizations, the role of third parties, the sources of power within negotiation, and the impact of gender, culture and other differences. Conducted in workshop format, combining theory and practice.

OBC 535. MANAGING CREATIVITY IN KNOWLEDGE INTENSIVE ORGANIZATIONS

  • This course considers creativity in its broadest sense from designing new products and processes to creating our own role and identity as managers and leaders in knowledge-intensive organizations. In this course we will look actively at our own creative process and how we might more fully realize our creative potential. At the same time we will build a conceptual understanding of creating, creativity, and knowledge based in the philosophic, academic, and practitioner literatures. We will critically apply this conceptual understanding to organizational examples of managing creativity in support of practical action.

OBC 536. ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN

  • A key role for organizational leaders is to design their organization to achieve their desired results. This course applies design thinking and methods to the practical problems of designing various sized organizations for optimal results in a complex environment. This is based on a foundation of organizational theory, design methodology, and organizational strategy. (Prerequisite: OBC 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

OBC 537. LEADING CHANGE

  • This course focuses on the role of leadership in the design and implementation of organizational change. Topics include visioning, communication, social influence, power, resiliency, and resistance to change. Teaching methods include classroom discussion of readings and cases, simulations, and experiential exercises. (Prerequisite: OBC 500 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

OBC 538. DEVELOPING MANAGERIAL TALENT

  • Assessing and developing managerial talent in yourself and others is a key to professional success and can be a source of organizational competitive advantage. This course addresses the Globalizing World and You, and provides students access to the frameworks, tools, and practice necessary to engage in thoughtful self-assessment, constructive feedback acquisition and interpretation, and strategic development planning for themselves as well as for others on their teams and in their organizations. The goals of this course are: a) to help students assess their own managerial abilities, b) to develop plans for securing new knowledge, skills and abilities that will help them in their careers, c) to set goals and agendas for their own development and d) to consider ways to translate this development process to others.

OIE 500. ANALYZING AND DESIGNING OPERATIONS TO CREATE VALUE

  • The operations of an organization focus on the transformation processes used to produce goods or provide services. In this course, a variety of statistical and analytical techniques are used to develop deep understanding of process behavior, and to use this analysis to inform process and operational designs. Topics such as measures of dispersion and confidence descriptions, correlation and regression analysis, and time series mathematics will be explored. Operations design is driven by strategic values, and can be critical to developing and sustaining competitive value. Philosophies such as lean thinking, as well as technology-based techniques such as optimization and simulation, are explored as a means of developing robust and effective operations.

OIE 501. DESIGNING OPERATIONS FOR COMPETETIVE ADVANTAGE

  • The operations function in an organization is focused on the transformation processes used to produce goods or provide services. Operations design is driven by strategic values, and innovative improvements can support sustained competitive advantage. In this course, a variety of analytical and statistical techniques are introduced to develop a deep understanding of process behavior, and to use this analysis to inform process and operational designs. Topics such as process analysis and value stream mapping, postponement and global and local supply chain strategies, queuing models, and managing system constraints are covered using case studies and hands-on activities such as on-line simulations. Non-traditional operations systems are also explored. The skills required to model an operational system, to reduce variation and mitigate bottlenecks, to effectively present resource needs, and to adjust capacity and inventory service levels are practiced during the course. (Students cannot get credit for OIE 501 and OIE 500)

OIE 541. OPERATIONS RISK MANAGEMENT

  • Operations risk management deals with decision making under uncertainty. It is interdisciplinary, drawing upon management science and managerial decision-making, along with material from negotiation and cognitive psychology. Classic methods from decision analysis are first covered and then applied, from the perspective of business process improvement, to a broad set of applications in operations risk management and design including: quality assurance, supply chains, information security, fire protection engineering, environmental management, projects and new products. A course project is required (and chosen by the student according to his/her interest) to develop skills in integrating subjective and objective information in modeling and evaluating risk. (An introductory understanding of statistics is assumed.)

OIE 542. RISK MANAGEMENT AND DECISION MAKING

  • Risk management deals with decision making under uncertainty. It is interdisciplinary, drawing upon management science and managerial decision-making, along with material from negotiation and cognitive psychology. Classic methods from decision analysis are first covered and then applied, from the perspective of business process improvement, to a broad set of applications in operations risk management and design including: quality assurance, supply chains, information security, fire protection engineering, environmental management, projects and new products. A course project is required (and chosen by the student according to his/her interest) to develop skills in integrating subjective and objective information in modeling and evaluating risk. (Prerequisite: OIE 501 or equivalent content, or instructor consent.) (Students cannot get credit for both OIE 542 and OIE 541.)

OIE 544. SUPPLY CHAIN ANAYLSIS AND DESIGN

  • This course studies the decisions, strategies and analytical methods in designing, analyzing, evaluating, and managing supply chains. Concepts, techniques, and frameworks for better supply chain performance are discussed, and how digital technologies enable companies to be more efficient and flexible in their internal and external operations are explored. The major content of the course is divided into three modules: supply chain integration, supply chain decisions, and supply chain management and control tools. Students will learn how to apply some of the techniques in Operations Research such as linear programming, dynamic programming, and decision tree to aid decision-making. A variety of instructional tools including lectures, case discussions, guest speakers, games, videos, and group projects and presentations are employed. (Prerequisite: OIE 501 or equivalent content, or instructor consent)

OIE 548. PRODUCTIVITY MANAGEMENT

  • Productivity management and analysis techniques and applications are covered from engineering and management perspectives. Topics include benchmarking, production functions, and the concept of relative efficiency and its measurement by data envelopment analysis. Application examples include efficiency evaluations of bank branches, sales outlets, hospitals, schools and others.

OIE 552. MODELING AND OPTIMIZING PROCESSES

  • This course is designed to provide students with a variety of quantitative tools and techniques useful in modeling, evaluating and optimizing operation processes. Students are oriented toward the creation and use of spreadsheet models to support decision-making in industry and business.

OIE 553. GLOBAL PURCHASING AND LOGISTICS

  • This course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of the decisions and challenges related to the design and implementation of a firm’s purchasing strategy within a context of an integrated, global supply chain. Topics centering on operational purchasing, strategic sourcing, and strategic cost management will be covered. The global logistics systems that support the purchasing process will be analyzed, and the commonly used techniques for designing and evaluating an effective logistics network will be studied.

OIE 554. GLOBAL OPERATIONS STRATEGY

  • This course focuses on operations strategy from a global perspective. Topics such as strategy of logistics and decisions to outsource are examined. As an example, the strategic issues concerned with firms that are doing R&D in the United States, circuit board assembly in Ireland and final assembly in Singapore. Cases, textbooks and recent articles relating to the topic are all used. Term paper based on actual cases is required.

OIE 555. LEAN PROCESS DESIGN

  • Lean thinking has transformed the way that organizational processes are designed and operated, using a systematic approach that eliminates waste by creating flow dictated by customer pull. In this course we explore the lean concepts of value, flow, demand-pull, and perfection in global, multistage processes. The tactics that are used to translate these general principles into practice, such as creating manufacturing cells, are also discussed. The design process is complicated because in reality not all wastes can be eliminated. To learn effective design, students will practice applying lean ideas in case studies and simulations, exploring how variability affects process dynamics and combining this knowledge with analysis of process data.

OIE 556. HEALTH SYSTEMS MODELING AND IMPROVEMENT

  • This course is organized around problem-solving frameworks for designing and improving health systems, exploring specific methodologies and their role in organizational change. Tools and techniques from operations management, industrial engineering, statistics, and management sciences, are used to explore common health systems design and management issues, focusing on data requirements and decision-making. Issues that may be explored include demand forecasting, process design, product design, and staffing and scheduling.

OIE 558. DESIGNING AND MANAGING SIX-SIGMA PROCESSES

  • This course teaches Six-Sigma as an organizational quality system and a set of statistical tools that have helped the world’s leading companies save millions of dollars and improve customer satisfaction. This course is organized in three parts: part one covers the essentials of Six-Sigma, including fundamental concepts, the advantages of Six-Sigma over Total Quality Management, and a five-phase model for building a Six-Sigma organization; part two of the course covers the Six-Sigma training, including technical topics such as capability and experimental design as well as how to train “Black Belts” and other key roles; part three describes the major activities of the Six- Sigma Roadmap, from identifying core processes to executing improvement projects to sustaining Six-Sigma gains.

OIE 597. SUPPLY CHAIN CONSULTING PROJECT

  • This course integrates Supply Chain Management theory and practice, and incorporates a number of skills and tools acquired in the Supply Chain Management curriculum. The objective of this course is twofold: (1) to enrich students’ experiential learning and equip the students with additional skillsets and capabilities to tackle real-world problems; and (2) to enhance their teamwork, interpersonal and consulting skills. The media is a consulting project, to be sponsored by an external organization, and is completed in teams. In addition to a written report, the project will be formally presented to members of the School, outside sponsors and other interested parties. Prerequisites: OIE 500, OIE 544, OIE 553, MIS 576, MKT 561, and OBC 533 or equivalent content, or instructor consent.