WPI’s Computer Science department is as diverse and varied as the field of computer science itself, offering courses and specializations in areas such as human-robotic interaction, intelligent tutoring and educational data mining, bioinformatics, computer security and privacy, and graphics and animation, among many others. WPI stays at the forefront of this ever-growing industry so that as society's use of computers expands, our students are confident in their knowledge of developing technologies in the real world through their work on large-scale team projects that make a real difference to the community.

Our hands-on education ensures that graduates of the Computer Science program leave WPI as problem-solvers and accomplished researchers who are ready to hit the ground running and make immediate contributions to this exciting and dynamic field.

Degrees & Certificates

Area of Study Bachelor Minor Certificate Master PhD
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A Cybersecurity concentration is available within the Bachelor of Computer Science degree.  A Cybersecurity specialization is available within the Master’s or PhD in Computer Science.

CS Department to Celebrate 50th Anniversary March 16, 2019

 

Click here for more details. 

The Most Recent Edition of SIGBITS

A summary of department happenings involving faculty and students.

Student Reflections: Rodica Neamtu

Rodica Neamtu, PhD '17,  this year's graduate commencement student speaker, shares why she chose WPI's computer science program and how she plans to pursue her love of teaching, research, and big data. 

PhD Graduate Student Reflection | The kind of people I want to work with

Careers in Computer Science

The widespread and increasing use of computers and information technology has generated a need for highly trained, innovative workers with extensive practical and theoretical expertise. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics continually predicts a faster-than-average growth rate in computer science jobs, thanks to the continued creation and adoption of new technologies.

In the News

Education Post featured an op-ed by Neil Heffernan, professor of computer science and director of learning sciences and technologies, that examines ways school districts nationwide can make homework more effective and relevant. In “Schools Don’t Need to Ban Homework; They Just Need to Make It Better,” Heffernan argues for homework technologies that help replicate the kind of back-and-forth interactions that students and teachers have in class.

Education Post

The Worcester Business Journal reported that WPI received a $895,000 grant from the Department of Education to provide six fellowships to graduate students looking to pursue studies in artificial intelligence. The program, called Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAAN), comes in anticipation of a decrease in artificial intelligence professionals in the field. GAAN will train students in the artificial intelligence field, and connect them with colleagues in academic, industry and government settings.  

Worcester Business Journal